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Biography of Joseph M. Shelton

JOSEPH M. SHELTON. – “Present misfortune is our future weal,” wrote the old homilist; and in human experience it has been well enough proved that in adversity is the power of a man’s character developed. Joseph M. Shelton, the subject of this sketch, had lived in comfort and prosperity on the family plantation in Caswell County, in North Carolina; but, in common with so many of the foremost Southern families, the Sheltons sustained heavy losses in the war, and by the liberation of the slaves of which Joseph’s father was a large owner. It was then that Joseph showed the force of character and sturdy determination which, in later years, have made him one of the leading men of the Northwest. He determined to be no longer dependent on his father, and, leaving the old plantation, crossed the plains with an ox-team, arriving in Denver, Colorado, in 1865. The Godfrey train, with which he traveled, was several times attacked by hostile Indians; and Mr. Shelton distinguished himself during these skirmishes by his bravery and ability as a leader of men. In Colorado he engaged in stock-raising in Boulder county, where he remained for seventeen years. it was during his residence there that he found his lifelong companion. In March, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Missouri C. Jones. Mrs. Shelton is one of those women who in ancient times were accounted the mothers of heroes. With the sweetness and gentleness of the truly refined lady, she combines the nobility of mind and the force of character that distinguish the typical women of the West. She was born...

Biography of C. A. Sander

C.A. SANDER. – This is one of those redoubtable men from Prussia who have helped to make our country great. He was born in 1840. At the age of twenty-five he came to America. He first engaged in milling in Florida. He followed the same business in New York and Kansas. He followed the same business in New York and Kansas. In 1868 he was in Arizona at work in the quartz mines for about fifteen months. He was next prospecting in British Columbia in the Peace river country. He then came down to The Dalles in Oregon, and worked a winter at milling, from which point he came to Kittitass county and located permanently on the ground where he now has a ranch and mill. For the first seven years after coming thither, Mr. Sander took whatever work came to hand and which promised a living, while he was accumulating means to build a home and to establish his mill. He now, owns eight hundred acres of the very best land in the county, has his own mill property free from incumbrances, and also enjoys his own residence and elegant property in Ellensburgh, Washington. The mill of which we speak has a capacity of seventy-five barrels per day, and now uses the roller process. More than half of his ranch is under cultivation, and has been made very handsome. Mr. Sander is enterprising and industrious, always ready to advance the general interests of the territory and of his county in particular; and he has done much already to open up and stimulate trade in Ellensburgh. He was married...

Biography of Frederick D. Schnebly

FREDERICK D. SCHNEBLY – Our subject was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1832, and was educated in the Franklin and Marshall College of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In 1854 he started for California by way of Nicaragua. In passing up the Pacific, the steamer, Star of the West, on which he had taken passage, took fire; but the horrors of a burning ship tragedy were avoided by the timely and effective labors of the crew and passengers. After stopping for a time in San Francisco, he visited the Sandwich Islands, but, returning to the Golden state, spent two unsuccessful years in mining. While there, in 1855, he witnessed a bloody pitched battle between several hundred Kong Kong Chinamen and an equal number of their Canton countrymen. Later he became a trader and miner in Siskiyou county, but left that region for the new gold fields on the Frazer River. After much journeying, he settled where Dayton, Washington, now stands. With one exception, he was the first to build a business house there. This property he sold, and wandered from camp to camp among the mountains of Idaho and Montana. In 1871 he reached Walla Walla, and in 1872 located a farm in the Kittitass valley near Ellensburgh, Washington Territory. In 1873 he started the first agricultural implement establishment in Yakima county, representing Hawley, Dodd & Co., and since 1855 continued the same business for Knapp, Burrell & Co. Mr. Schnebly’s political record is that of a Democrat; and in 1878 he was elected sheriff of Yakima county by a majority of one hundred and fifty out of a total vote of...

Biographical Sketch of John M. Newman

JOHN M. NEWMAN. – The gentleman whom we here introduce to the reader, and a view of whose residence is placed in this history, is a native of Sullivan County, Missouri, and was born August 10,1851. While but a lad of thirteen he came to eastern Oregon, and, after a sojourn of a year upon the sage-brush plains, continued the march to the Willamette valley. Some years were there spent in Marion and Benton counties, the most interesting period of his life there being his marriage to Miss Isabel Forgey, a noble woman who has borne him eight children. In 1878 he arrived in the Kittitas valley, and took a claim seven miles from Ellensburgh, Washington Territory. There he still resides, and is engaged in cultivating his farm. He intersperses the time with running a blacksmith shop, which is well patronized. His one hundred and ninety acres of excellent land supporting many head of horses and cattle, producing much grain, and improved with good buildings and an orchard of three hundred trees, is now one of the most delightful places in Kittitas county. As justice of the peace, as school director, and in many public ways, Mr. Newman assists in helping on the community, and is a well-respected citizen. His progressive and helpful qualities are sought, and are ever ready to be lent in schemes of public improvement, such as immigration, etc. His surviving children are Olive M., Lillie V., James Otis, Minnie May, Fred P., Jacob Niles. Ada and Lena are...

Biography of David Murray

DAVID MURRAY. – This gentleman is a well-known capitalist. He has retired from active business, and is now reaping the benefits of a life full of even and unceasing hard work. David Murray is a name that every youngster in the Kittitass valley, Washington, is familiar with. It might be well for those very same youths if they had a few of the hardships to go through that Mr. Murray did in his early life. He was born in Maine in 1831, and at the age of twenty left his home to seek his fortunes in the Golden state of California. he embarked onboard one of the sailing vessels that brought a dry dock to the Pacific coast. Rounding the “Horn” with that massive bulk in cargo was no very safe undertaking. However, reaching California, he settled at Vallejo, on San Francisco Bay; and, not having been overstocked with money upon leaving his home, he was forced to accept what work he could obtain. He did the first work that was ever done on Mare Island, where the government works and navy yard now are. After finishing his employment there, he led a life of various pursuits for a period of ten years, among which were mining, lumbering and ranching during the great Caribou gold excitement of 1862 he made his way to that field, and took up a ranch on the Fraser river, 150miles above Fort Yale, He was the first rancher in that locality, and worked assiduously on his claim for a period of six or seven years. In 1870 he gave up the ranch there, and...

Biography of James S. Dysart

JAMES S. DYSART. – The subject of this sketch, a portrait of whom is placed in this work, was born in Delaware county, New York, March 22, 1838. His parents were Duncan and Elizabeth (Shaw) Dysart, natives of Scotland. James resided at the place of his birth until he was seventeen years old, when he went via Nicaragua to California to join his brother Alexander, who was living in San Francisco. He reached that city in 1855. His first location was at Placerville, where he engaged in lumbering. That point he made his home till 1862. In that year he went to Nevada, and was engaged in the hotel business on the overland stage road. At Stillwater in Churchill county he followed various lines of business till the winter of 1867. His next move took him to Mendocino county, California. He bought a ranch near Ukiah, and followed farming one year. Then returning to Nevada, whence he went to the Sound, where he remained till 1870. then going to the mines, with the result of sinking some $700 in a short time, he went back to the Sound, and in the fall of that year crossed the Cascades to the region of what is know Kittitass county. In October, 1871, he located his present place, a government claim of one hundred and sixty acres, to which he has added one hundred and twenty acres by purchase. It is located four miles east of Ellensburgh. In 1884 Mr. Dysart beautified his place with an elegant house. Mr. Dysart united with Mr. Farnsworth in building and running the second sawmill in...

Biography of Thomas Johnson

THOMAS JOHNSON. – The gentleman whose name appears above belongs to three towns on the east slope of the Cascades, – Goldendale, Ellensburgh and Cle-Elum; and it may almost be said that in the course of their development these three towns belong to him. At least, he has been a leading and constructive spirit in them. He is a native of Canada, where he was born in 1839, and came to this coast in search of the golden fleece at Caribou in 1862. The Province, however, detained him but a year; and he came down to Rockland opposite The Dalles, employing himself in running the ferry across the Columbia. Going to Canada in 1866, he married Miss Connell, and after his return to his Rockland home made a number of rapid shifts. all of which advanced him on the road to fortune. He operated the ferry a year, was in the cattle business on the Klikitat two years, and bought sixteen hundred acres of land near Rockland and farmed three years. Going now to the site of Goldendale with the autocratic license of the king or frontiersman, he laid out the city, built the first store, built a gristmill, and followed this with a sawmill. In 1880 he established the bank. With the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad towards the Cascade Mountains, he went to Ellensburgh, reaching that point before the railroad, and took a contract for lumber, prosecuting also the mercantile business. A fire destroyed thirty-five thousand dollars’ worth of his property; yet it did not seriously hinder his operations. He went to building again, this time...

Biographical Sketch of James J. Imbrie

JAMES J. IMBRIE. – Among those who have sketches of their lives in these pages, there are but few spoken of who, like the subject of this memoir, were “Webfoot” born. He first saw the light of day at his father’s farm on Tualatin Plains, January 29,1852. During his earlier years he learned the rudiments of his education at the log schoolhouse long since a thing of the past. Later on he attended and continued his studies at Pacific University at Forest Grove, and in June, 1877, graduated with high honors from the Willamette University at Salem. Removing to Portland he engaged at clerical work for about two years, and then went to Eastern Washington and devoted his energies to stock-raising, which he actively and successfully followed until 1882, when he located in North Yakima and opened a hardware store, leaving the care of his stock to others. During the winter of 1882-83 his losses through severe weather and horse-thieves left him with nothing except his store. In the fall of 1883 he disposed of his interest in the hardware business, and removed to Ellensburgh, Washington Territory. There he engaged in the machine and implement trade, which he followed until 1887, when he began operating in real estate. In this business he is now engaged. Mr. Imbrie was married to Miss May Swetland, of Vancouver, Washington Territory, in 1882. By this union three children were born all of whom are...

Biography of David J. Schnebly

DAVID J. SCHNEBLY. – Among all the editors whose lives are sketched in this volume, Mr. Schnebly yields to none the priority, since in 1850 he was conducting the only newspaper then in Oregon. He was born near Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1818, and from that state drew the physical completeness and mental energy for which her people have been distinguished. As a youth of seventeen he removed with his parents to Illinois, but there was greatly afflicted by the loss of his father by death. In 1840 he returned to his native state in order to pursue a course of literary study, and spent some years thereafter at Marshall College. In 1850 he felt the impulse to give his life to the establishment of a new state on the Pacific coast, and arriving in Oregon found scope for his native abilities and for his literary acquirements as editor of the Spectator. That was the first paper established on the Pacific coast, and the only one published in Oregon in 1850. In the year following Mr. Schnebly, having gained the confidence of the people, and being well assured by all of his fitness for the position of publisher and censor of the ideas and opinions of the people of the state, purchased the establishment, and was editor and proprietor until 1854. reference to the old files of that journal show the success that attended his efforts. He sold out, however, in the latter year to W.L. Adams, M.D., now at Hood River, who changed the name to the Argus. In the meantime Mr. Schnebly had been married to Miss Margaret...

Biography of William H. Peterson

WILLIAM H. PETERSON. – Mr. Peterson, an excellent portrait of whom is placed in this history, was born in West Virginia, August 31, 1836, and removed to Missouri in 1868. He became a teacher of schools and a collector of taxes in the latter state, and was so efficient in the position last-named as to remain in office three terms. In 1876 he put behind him the vast plains of the Mississippi, and even the more expanded region of the Rocky Mountains, and made his home by the Western sea in California. Over the northern part of that state he made many peregrinations, consuming thus three and one-half years. From that point he undertook the final stage of his journey to Washington Territory, settling in Kittitass (then Yakima) county, and securing a place some nine miles east of Ellensburgh. He soon gained the confidence of the people and was elected superintendent of schools, serving two years Upon the establishment of Kittitass as a county in 1883, Mr. Peterson became auditor and has been twice chosen to the same office, declining a re-nomination in 1888. He was also appointed clerk of the district court by Judge Hoyt, and was retained by Judges Turner and Nash, a position he still holds. Other public positions have also been given him to fill; and he is a trustee of the Ellensburgh Academy. Mr. Peterson was married in West Virginia in 1863 to Miss Anna E. Roach, and has a family of two children, Joseph W. and Virginia. While thus himself a pioneer of the Pacific states, the records of the family to which...
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