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Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

The Indian tribes of California are in a degraded and miserable condition. The most numerous are the Shoshonee, the Blackfeet, and the Crows. Many of them have been brought to a half civilized state, and are employed at the different ranches. But those in the neighborhood of the Sierra Nevada are untamable, treacherous, and ferocious. They wander about, for the most part going entirely naked, and subsisting upon roots, acorns, and pine cones. Since the discovery of the gold, they have acquired some knowledge of its usefulness, but no clear conception of its value, and they part with their gatherings for whatever strikes their fancy, without much hesitation in bargaining with dealers. They are generally of medium stature, dark skin and hair, (which grow low down over their foreheads,) with ugly countenances, devoid of any intellectual expression, and are immeasurably inferior to the Indians east of the Rocky Mountains, and those of the Atlantic States. Soon after the discovery of the placers, the Indians displayed their hostility by attacking straggling miners, and, growing bolder, committed serious depredations in the neighborhood of the mines furthest advanced towards the Sierra Nevada; at length, the murder of a number of Oregonians led to a destructive warfare between the whites and Indians. It happened that six men of a clan were out “prospecting,” (exploring,) on the Middle Fork, and when they had penetrated a deep canon, (gulf,) a party of some forty Indians attacked them from the heights above. Unsuspicious of an ambuscade, the explorers had left their arms at some distance, and a flight of arrows among them was the first intimation...

Biography of William Leslie Porter

A public office is only an opportunity for rendering real service to the public. Whether that opportunity is utilized depends upon the man. Several years ago the people of Topeka elected William Leslie Porter commissioner of parks and public properties. When he entered office he was new to the duties, and he was practically without political experience. But he had exhibited other qualities far more important that political experience. He had a well defined ambition to do everything he could for the community welfare through the opportunity afforded by his office. Mr. Porter also had a reputation of having a strong will and ample determination to carry out any plan upon which he embarks. The results in the past two or three years stand as a splendid justification of his election as commissioner. Some brief survey of what had been accomplished in those two or three years is necessary to complate the personal record of Mr. Porter and is also an important chapter in Topeka municipal history. In the year 1914 one small playground was eatablished in one of the Topeka parks. The experiment was one of unqualified success from the standpoint of the parents, the neighborhood and the children. Then followed an association composed of members of the school board, the city commissioners and the Commercial Club. The association appointed a legislative committee. This committee appeared before the legislature in 1915 and pleaded for the enactment of a law giving to the school board the right to make a levy of a quarter of a mill for the support of playgrounds. The law passed, and thus in 1915...

Jaensch, Joseph William – Obituary

Joseph William Jaensch was born on September 11, 1917 in Eatonville, Columbia County, Washington. He was born to Charles Franklin Jaensch Sr. and Josephine (Reichmuth) Jaensch. When he was a youngster the Jaensch family moved to Enterprise (Alder Slope) where he grew up and attended school until WWII when he joined the Army Air Force and flew B-24 bombers. He was in training at Marfa, Texas when he met his future wife, Irene. After the war was over he lived in El Paso, Texas as this was where Irene’s family was from. Mr. Jaensch passed away March 18, 1953 as the result of an automobile accident outside of El Paso, Texas. Burial was in Fort Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas. He was preceded in death by his father, Charles Franklin Jaensch Sr. Survivors are his wife Irene of El Paso, mother Josephine Jaensch of Portland, Oregon, brother Charles Franklin Jaensch Jr. of Portland, Oregon and two nephews, Gerald Franklin Jaensch and David Michael Jaensch of Baker, Oregon. Also several aunts and uncles from Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington. I, Gerald Franklin Jaensch on this day did make this obituary of Joseph William Jaensch until a copy of an original obituary is received. It is my intention to make as true a document as I can make with the information I possess. Gerald F. Jaensch, May 30,...

Denney, William L. – Obituary

William L. “Bill” Denney, 63, of Champaign, Ill., and formerly of Wallowa County, died Aug. 13 after a long battle with pancreal cancer. Bramley Funeral Home in Champaign is in charge of arrangements. A funeral was held Aug. 18 in Divernon, Ill., with burial in Pawnee, Ill., at Calvary Cemetery. A memorial service will begin at 11 a.m. Sept. 5 at Northside Baptist Church in Vancouver, Wash. A reception and visitation will follow. Bill was born Dec. 14, 1944, to Clifford R. and Mary (Betz) Denney in Spokane. He moved to Oregon in 1948 to the lower Imnaha area. He excelled in school with highest honors and several scholarships. He was grateful to Gardner Locke and Wm. Williams Sr. for help they gave him in high school, especially trigonometry, calculus and other advanced mathematics. He attended Oregon State University where he majored in forest-civil engineering, business administration and mathematics. He received his bachelor of science degree with highest honors. He worked for Bill Hagedorn of Portland as office manager and business manager for three years, then returned to Oregon State for graduate school. He received his MBA with highest honors in 1972. He met and married Arlys Wright in 1968. His daughter, Lanae, was born in 1975 and Rachelle was born in 1978. They lived in a home built at Salmon Creek. They moved to El Paso, Texas, in 1983 when Bill found work with Wang Computer Software as engineering manager. The family moved to Blaine, Wash., where he started a computer company, developing civil engineering software. The patent sold to Plus III Software, and he continued developing software...

Biography of John B. Tays

John B. Tays is one of the early settlers and enterprising and progressive citizens of Ontario. He is the owner of forty acres of land in that colony and has for years been building up the horticultural industries of his section. His place is located on the south side of Thirteenth Street, east of Euclid Avenue. Mr. Tays purchased this land in 1883 and immediately commenced its improvement, planting trees and vines. He is justly ranked among the pioneer horticulturists of Ontario, and has produced one of the representative places of his section. He now has twenty acres in citrus fruits, of which fifteen acres are in oranges of the Washington Navel and Mediterranean Sweet varieties; five acres are in lemons. His fine vineyards contain twenty acres, fourteen acres being devoted to wine grapes of the Zinfandel, Berger and Riesling varieties, and six acres to Muscat raisin grapes. There are also 400 olive trees upon his laud, three years old. The products of his vineyards are cared for upon the ranch. He dries, packs and ships his raisins, and to dispose of his wine grapes has built a well-ordered and complete winery for distilling the brandies necessary to fortify his sweet wines. He is successful in this industry and his products find a ready sale at good prices. A neat and comfortable cottage residence, suitable outbuildings, etc., attest the well-ordered home. Mr. Tays has also been identified with building up the town of Ontario. Among his improvements in that respect was the improvements on the villa lot on the corner of D and Euclid avenues, where he lived for...

Myhand, Florence Parnell Slaughter Mrs. – Obituary

Halfway, Oregon Florence Parnell Slaughter Myhand, 84, of Halfway, died March 30, 2003, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. Her graveside service will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Fort Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas. Florence was born on Jan. 30, 1919, at Stonewall, Okla., to James A. and Hattie E. Word Parnell. In 1936, she married Wayne L. Slaughter. They had three children. In 1948, the family moved to El Paso, Texas, where she would make her home for the next 49 years. Florence worked and was the manager of the William Beaumont branch of the State National Bank for 15 years, retiring in the early 70s. In 1967, she married Henry A. “Hank” Myhand. Together they enjoyed gardening, traveling, camping, fishing and hunting until his death in 1985. She was also very talented with crochet and made many lovely afghans for her family. Florence moved to Halfway in June of 1997 where she continued to enjoy her gardening and began to enjoy all of the different species of birds that would visit her feeders. She really enjoyed the quail that made their rounds through her yard daily. She derived a great deal of pleasure from her home and her flowers. She also enjoyed the many car trips to visit her grandchildren and great-grandchildren who affectionately called her “grape-grandma.” She was preceded in death by her parents, two brothers, two sisters and her husband, Hank. Survivors include her daughters, Juanita F. Borth of Killeen, Texas, and Lorraine Huff and her husband, David, of Halfway; her son, Donald W. Slaughter, and his wife, Sandra, of El Paso, Texas;...

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