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Biography of Hon. J. J. Smith

Hon. J. J. Smith, an able representative of the Miami bar, who has here practiced his profession since 1915, is specializing in criminal law, in which branch of jurisprudence he has been very successful, and he has also done effective service for the public good as a member of the state senate. He was born June 23, 1889, near Ranger, in Eastland county, Texas, upon the farm of his parents, Benjamin F. and Catherine (Simpson) Smith, the latter also a native of that section of the Lone Star state, while the former was born in Madison county, North Carolina. While residing in North Carolina the father was in the employ of the government, serving as peace and revenue, officer at Asheville and at Mars Hill. From that state he removed to Texas, where he engaged in riding the range, leading the life of a frontiersman. In 1900 he came to Oklahoma, following the occupation of farming in Greer county. He and his wife now reside upon a farm in Beckham county, this, state. His political allegiance has always been given to the democratic party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and he has been active in its support, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons. He is an expert marksman and is a typical frontiersman whose life has been spent upon the broad, open ranges. In the acquirement of an education Mr. Smith attended the grammar and high schools of Hobart, Oklahoma, and an academy at Cordell, this state. From boyhood he had been desirous of following the legal profession and with this end in...

Biography of Professor Charles Byron Smith

Professor Charles Byron Smith, principal of the Washington school at Muskogee, is a native of Rusk County, Texas, his parents being Lucien Drayton and Amanda Melvina Smith. The father was born in Buncombe County, North Carolina, and in 1852 re-moved to Texas. The mother was born in Tennessee and became a resident of the Lone Star state in 1836. Mr. Smith was a ranch-man farmer and early removed with his family to western Texas, where his son, Professor Smith, grew to manhood with scarcely any Church or school privileges but nevertheless was well instructed religiously and educationally, for when he entered his first school he was ready for the fourth grade work and was familiar with all of the Bible stories. When he was twenty-one years of age he went away to college at Granbury, Texas, working his way through that institution. On account of a misfortune, however, he could attend for but three years. He took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for thirteen years in Texas in the rural and in the graded schools and also taught in three summer normal schools in that state. He has likewise taught in eleven summer normal schools in Oklahoma. However, he remained, upon the home farm until he attained his majority, being the main dependence for a family of twelve, as his father was never a well man after Charles B. Smith was twelve years of age. Following his three years’ work in college Professor Smith secured a position as teacher of a rural school and after two terms was appointed teacher of a graded school in Cisco,...

Biography of J. W. Smith

The demise of J. W. Smith, which occurred at Dewey on the 27th of October, 1921, when he was sixty-seven years of age, removed from the scene of life’s activities a man who was straight-forward and reliable in business, progressive and loyal in citizenship and true to the ties of home and friendship. He was born at Franklin, Venango County, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1854, and two of his brothers, John and Will, are still living in that state, while another brother, Wesley, a veteran of the Civil war, is residing in Iowa. In 1907 Mr. Smith came to Oklahoma, establishing his home in Dewey, where he remained until 1913, when he went to the Cushing oil fields and from there to the oil fields of Kansas. In 1917 he made his way to Ranger, Texas, where he engaged in the business of oil drilling, and he also became field manager in that state for a large oil company, continuing to act in that capacity until failing health obliged him to return to his family, then living at Wichita, Kansas. During her husband’s absence Mrs. Smith had successfully conducted a large modern rooming house in that city for both transient and regular guests, her establishment containing forty-two rooms. Thinking that a warmer climate might prove beneficial, Mrs. Smith advised her husband to return to Dewey and here he passed away ten months after undergoing an operation. Mrs. Smith did everything within her power to prolong the life of her husband, distracting his mind as much as possible from his illness and never allowing him to know its serious nature. She...

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