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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Knowles Family of New Bedford, MA

The family bearing this name in New Bedford, where it is one of nearly one hundred years’ standing one, too, of prominence and wealth, is a branch of the ancient Knowles family of the town of Eastham, Barnstable county, this Commonwealth. Reference is made to some of the descendants of the brothers Thomas and James H. Knowles of Eastham, several of whose sons – at least two of the former and one of the latter – in their earlier manhood cast their lot with the people of New Bedford. The firm of Thomas Knowles & Co. for many years was one of the greatest engaged in the whale fishery business in New Bedford; and its members in turn have been succeeded in business by younger generations who have most worthily worn the family name and sustained its reputation; and today the name continues of record in and about the city of their birth connected prominently with many of the most extensive commercial establishments and banking institutions of the locality.

Descendants of Chauncey Sears of Fall River, MA

As will be seen in what follows the Fall River family of Sears here considered – to which belongs Chauncey Howe Sears, an extensive mason contractor and builder and one of Fall River’s well-known citizens and substantial men – is one of some two hundred and sixty and more years’ standing in this Commonwealth. The family history and genealogy of the Fall River family follow in chronological order from the immigrant settler.

Biography of Joseph Reed Burgess

JOSEPH REED BURGESS. Superintendent of schools of Monson, is one of the best known educators of Hampden County and Western Massachusetts. A man of wide education and excellent knowledge of his profession, he has held innumerable responsible and important pedagogical positions in the county, the State, and in Maine, and he is now one of the most highly esteemed members of the teaching profession. He is an active citizen and club and fraternal man of the town and county and is generally recognized as a leader of the pedagogical fraternity. Joseph Reed Burgess was born in Rockland, May 21, 1893, the son of Horatio B. Burgess, a sole leather buyer, who successively held the posts of chief of fire department and chief of police department in Rockland, and Georgianna Burgess. Joseph Reed Burgess was educated in the public schools of his native town, in the Rockland High School and he took his pedagogical studies in the Bridgewater Normal School, going through all the courses, including the advanced normal subjects. He completed his education in Harvard University. He had been teaching school but a short time when he was appointed principal of the Eastham Grammar School at Eastham, where he remained several years. He then became principal of the Longfellow and Emerson schools at Sanford, Maine, after which he was principal of the Sawyer School, in Gloucester. Massachusetts. His next position was that of assistant superintendent of schools of the Agawam and Ludlow districts, of Hampden County, and soon after he resigned to become superintendent of schools of Monson, Hampden County. Mr. Burgess is a member of the John Cutler...

Nauset Tribe

Nauset Indians. An Algonquian tribe formerly living in Massachusetts, on that part of Cape Cod east of Bass river, forming a part of or being under control of the Wampanoag. A writer1 says: “The Indians in the county of Barnstable were a distinct people, but they were subject in some respects to the chief sachem of the Wampanoags.” They probably came in contact with the whites at an early date, as the cape was frequently visited by navigators. From this tribe Hunt in 1614 carried off 7 natives and sold them into slavery with 20 Indians of Patuxet. Champlain had an encounter with the Nauset immediately before returning to Europe. They seem to have escaped the great pestilence which prevailed along the New England coast in 1617. Although disposed to attack the colonists at their first meeting, they because their fast friends, and with few exceptions remained faithful to them through King Philip’s War, even in some instances lending assistance. Most of them had been Christianized before this war broke out. Their estimated population in 1621 was 500, but this is probably below their real strength at that time, as they seem to have numbered as many 80 nears afterward. About 1710, by which time they were all organized into churches, they lost a great many by fever. In 1764 they had decreased to 106, living mainly at Potanumaquut, but in 1802 only 4 were said to remain. Their principal village, Nauset, was near the present Eastham. Although their location indicates that fish furnished their chief sustenance, the Nauset were evidently cultivators of the soil, as supplies of corn...

Biographical Sketch of Richard Knowles

(II) Richard Knowles, progenitor of the Plymouth county family, son of Rev. John Knowles, was probably born in England, before his father, Rev. John, came to this country. He commanded a barque engaged in transporting military supplies for the government. Before 1653 he was located at Eastham, Massachusetts. Children: 1. Mercy, married- , February 5,1663. 2. Colonel John, married, December 28, 1670, Apphia Bangs; he was killed by the Indians in King Philip’s war and his widow married Joseph Atwood. 3. Samuel, born September 17, 1651, mentioned elsewhere. 4. Mehitable, May 20, 1653, died young. 5. Mehitable, 1655. 6. Barbara,...

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