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Biographical Sketch of W. J. Barnes

W. J. Barnes, proprietor of Madison Hotel, is a native of Dutchess County, N. Y. In the spring of 1866, the family came to Columbus, Neb. The following year, they removed to Madison County, where he has since resided. The family are among the first 24 settlers of the county. His brother pre-empted this land and laid out this town. His father pre-empted a quarter section on the north. W. J. also pre-empted a quarter section, making about one section which the family entered. He has since been engaged in farming, and has recently opened this...

Genealogy of Elleazer Baker of Dutchess County NY

T164 ELLEAZER BAKER: b. 1735; Commissary in Revolutionary War; d. 1815. T165 DAVID BAKER: b. 1775, in Dutchess County, New York. Removed to Green Co.; settled 4 miles from Hall Family; m. Elizabeth Losee, b. 1779; d. 1834. T166 AMBROSE BAKER: b. August, 1803; m. 1825 to Polly Hall; moved to Coxsackie, situated upon the west bank of the Hudson River distant 21 miles below Albany. The Location became known as the Upper or Baker’s Landing, for it was there that he built a dock of log cribbing filled with stones, brush and dirt, extending several hundred feet out from the shore so that vessels might lay in deep water whilst loading or unloading. Harvey Hall: b. 1831 in Coxsackie; m. Nellie Goodenow Sept. 8, 1869; died at Davenport, Iowa. She was born 1847; d. 1923. Edwin L.: b. April 3, 1879; m. Ruth Emily Wheeler Dec. 7, 1924; 1. 5233 Monte Vista St., Los Angeles, Calif. Howard A.: b. Oct. 16, 1875; 1. 908 E. Ponce de Leon Ave., Decatur, Ga. Ta164 ELLEAZER BAKER: m. and had the following children: William: m. Sophronia -. Newton. Erastus: m. Margaret Perry in Canada. William: m. Minnie Champney; m. (2), Alice Camp; lived at Rochester, N. Y. Ina May: m. Frank Smith and had Vivian (m. George Bush) and Graig. Craig. Edward. Charles: m. Clara Deyea and had Betty; resides Rochester. Harriet: m. Craig Tebeau; m. (2), Charles Cooper. Ch.: Lewis (m. Gurnee Leeder; had Robert and Marjorie; 1. in Brooklyn, N. Y.), and Marion (m. Harley Cooper and had Harriet, Marion, Helen and Barbara; resides in Albany, N. Y.). Add.:...

Biographical Sketch of Josiah Miller

Josiah Miller, a pioneer newspaper man of Lawrence and Kansas, an ardent free-soiler and public official in the formative periods of the territory and the state, was born in Chester District, South Carolina, November 12, 1828. He gradnated from the Indiana University in 1851, and from the law school at Poughkeepsie, New York, and in August, 1854, came to Kansas. As his father had been waylaid and mobbed because of his anti-slavery views, it was but natural that Josiah should be an ardent opponent of slavery, and on January 5, 1855, he began the publication of the Kansas Free State at Lawrence. A pro-slavery jury found an indictment against him for maintaining a nuisance in its publication, and on May 21, 1856, his printing office was destroyed by the territorial anthorities. In that year he made speeches in several states for John C. Fremont, the republican candidate for president, and in 1857 was elected probate judge of Douglas County. In 1861 he was a member of the first State Senate, but resigned his seat in that body to become postmaster at Lawrence. In 1863 he was appointed a paymaster in the army, with the rank of major, and in 1866 was elected a member of the Legislature. His death occurred at Lawrence on July 7, 1870, after having a leg amputated. The inscription on the monument erected to his memory in Oak Hill Cemetery credits him with being the author of the motto, “Ad astra per aspera,” on the Kansas seal of...

Will of Walnovers Letin, – 1671/2

Inventory of estate of WALNOVERS LETIN, of Dover, Staten Island, who hath lately deceased, taken by Gideon Marlett, Constable, in presence of Peter Belew, Simeon Come, Tys Barenson, “and many others then present,” January 16, 1671/2. One lot and housing, £1,000. Whole is £2,592. LIBER 1-2, page...

Biography of Edward C. Stuart

Edward C. Stuart, starting upon his banking career as clerk in the First National Bank of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, is now the vice president of the First National Bank of St. Louis, one of the largest and strongest financial institutions of the Mississippi valley. Advancement came to him in recognition of his worth and ability in his chosen field of labor. He has ever made it his purpose thoroughly to master any task entrusted to him and as power grows through the exercise of effort he has become a strong factor in financial circles of his adopted city. He was born in Powhattan, Arkansas, March 2, 1879. His father, Pitman C. Stuart, was a native of Lawrence county, Arkansas, and was a representative of an old English family that in an early period of American settlement was established in Virginia. From that date representatives of the family went to Kentucky and later to Arkansas. Pittman C. Stuart was married to Miss Katherine Williams, a daughter of William Williams, of Cape Girardeau county, Missouri. Her grandfather in the paternal line was born in Wales and came to America in young manhood. The death of Pittman C. Stuart occurred in 1881, and the mother still survives, making her home in Cape Girardeau. Edward C. Stuart was educated in the public schools of Cape Girardeau until he reached the age of fourteen years and he afterward attended the Cape Girardeau State Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1897 with the Bachelor of Science degree. He had also pursued business training in Eastman’s Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York. Mr. Stuart...

Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah Purdy

Jeremiah Purdy came from Dutchess county and settled at Sherburne Four Corners, where Milton Bentley now lives, and resided there till he had become advanced in years. Benjamin and Israel Ferris were brothers, though the latter settled in North Norwich, about a mile above the village, on the Dalrymple farm. Benjamin settled about a mile west of Sherburne village, where Morris Buell now...

Biography of Hugh Jackson Robinson

Hugh Jackson Robinson. Going about the streets with firm step, attending to his affairs with unclouded mind, Hugh Jackson Robinson has attained the dignity and distinction of eight-three years of useful and honorable life. He is one of the oldest residents of Champaign County and has known this section of Illinois for over sixty years. He was born near Belfast, Ireland, March 28, 1833, a son of Robert and Maria Margaret (Jackson) Robinson. His mother, it is said, was a first cousin of President Andrew Jackson. The Robinsons are of Scotch stock. The mother died in Ireland and the father subsequently came to the United States and first located in Dutchess County, New York. He lived there until 1848, and in that year moved west to Wisconsin, which had just become a state. He took up a claim in Fond du Lac County and cleared up a farm. This was his home until his death on June 15, 1852. They had six children, Mary, Jane, Eleanor, John, Hugh J. and William, Hugh being the only one now living. The sister Mary died when nearly ninety years of age. Hugh J. Robinson acquired his early education in New York State, and at the age of nineteen, in the fall of 1852, came to Urbana, Illinois, with the Gere Brothers, tie and timber contractors. He spent four years with this firm getting out tie and bridge timbers. In 1857 Mr. Robinson acquired his first interests in Champaign County as a farmer, buying a quarter section in Section 33, Sadorus Township. This is now known as the Pioneer Grove Farm. In 1860...

Biography of Judge John T. Morgan

The gentleman whose name heads this review has been a conspicuous figure in the legislative and judicial history of two states. Probably the public life of no other illustrious citizen of Idaho has extended over as long a period as his, and certainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more constant in honor, more fearless in conduct and more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been called upon to move he has made an indelible impression, and by his excellent public service and upright life he has honored the state, which has honored him with high official preferment. Judge Morgan was born in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. His ancestors, leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales, became early settlers of New England, and through many generations members of the family were residents of Connecticut and active participants in the affairs which go to form’ the colonial history of the nation. In the war of the Revolution they fought for the independence of the country, and at all times have been loyal to American interests. James Clark Morgan, the father of the Judge, was born in Connecticut in 1798, and married Penelope Green, a native of Herkimer County, New York. He was an industrious farmer and served as justice of the peace for many years, discharging his duties most faithfully. In his religious views he was a Universalist. He died in February 1872, at the age of seventy-four years, and his wife departed this life in her...

Biography of John Scales

John Scales, a resident of Wagontown, is a native of the Emerald Isle, his birth having occurred in Kilrush, County Clare, on the 6th of May 1840. At the time of the protectorate in England members of the Scales family, natives of that land, went to Ireland as soldiers of Oliver Cromwell, and for their services were paid in Irish estates, called “sword-lands.” The parents of our subject were Samuel and Rachel Scales, who were distant relatives. They came to America in 1855, bringing with them their family of five children, and took up their residence in the state of Maine. The father died in 1875, at the age of seventy-two years, and the mother spent her last days in the home of her son John, passing away at the advanced age of ninety-two years. Four of the children yet survive, one being a resident of Maine, one of Oregon, one of Silver City and one of Wagontown, Idaho, and thus they are separated by the width of the continent. John Scales was a youth of fifteen years when he accompanied his parents on the voyage across the briny deep. He attended school in his native land and pursued a commercial course in Eastman’s Business College of Poughkeepsie, New York. His residence in Idaho dates from 1868, when he took up his abode in Silver City and began work in the mines. At that time miners were making from five to twenty dollars per day. He also became part owner of the Casco mines near the De Lamar mines, and while milling for others also took out ore from...

Biography of William H. Stufflebeam

There is not a more popular man in Idaho either as Elk or “landlord” than William Herman Stufflebeam, proprietor of the Blackfoot Hotel, at Blackfoot; there is not a man better liked on purely personal grounds; and there is not a man to whom the citizens of Idaho would more confidently entrust the unraveling of a difficult problem or the settlement of important monetary interests than to Mr. Stufflebeam, who is a business man of careful and comprehensive training. William Herman Stufflebeam was born at Whitehall, Washington county, New York. His paternal great-grandfather and his grandfather fought together in the patriot cause during the Revolutionary struggle, the former as captain and the latter as private in his father’s company. After peace and American independence were established, these two patriot soldiers became prosperous farmers in Hudson County, New York, and upon the death of the father the old homestead descended to the son. William G. Stufflebeam, father of the subject of this review, was born in 1834 and married Miss Olive Mosher, a native of Washington County. He was long superintendent of the New York & Lake Champlain Transportation Company. In 1883, in company with his son, William Herman Stufflebeam, he came west on a prospecting tour, and bought a stock ranch twenty-five miles south of Blackfoot. In 1884 his wife and their other children came out from New York state and the family was reunited on this place, which comprises twelve hundred acres and is regarded as one of the fine stock ranches of Idaho. Mr. and Mrs. Stufflebeam had four children, all of whom are living: William Herman,...
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