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Slave Narrative of Tempie Herndon Durham

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Tempie Herndon Durham Location: 1312 Pine St., Durham, North Carolina Age: 103 I was thirty-one years ole when de surrender come. Dat makes me sho nuff ole. Near ’bout a hundred an’ three years done passed over dis here white head of mine. I’se been here, I mean I’se been here. ‘Spects I’se de olest nigger in Durham. I’se been here so long dat I done forgot near ’bout as much as dese here new generation niggers knows or ever gwine know. My white fo’ks lived in Chatham County. Dey was Marse George an’ Mis’ Betsy Herndon. Mis Betsy was a Snipes befo’ she married Marse George. Dey had a big plantation an’ raised cawn, wheat, cotton an’ ‘bacca. I don’t know how many field niggers Marse George had, but he had a mess of dem, an’ he had hosses too, an’ cows, hogs an’ sheeps. He raised sheeps an’ sold de wool, an’ dey used de wool at de big house too. Dey was a big weavin’ room whare de blankets was wove, an’ dey wove de cloth for de winter clothes too. Linda Hernton an’ Milla Edwards was de head weavers, dey looked after de weavin’ of de fancy blankets. Mis’ Betsy was a good weaver too. She weave de same as de niggers. She say she love de clackin’ soun’ of de loom, an’ de way de shuttles run in an’ out carryin’ a long tail of bright colored thread. Some days she set at de loom all de mawnin’ peddlin’ wid her feets an’ her white han’s flittin’ over de...

Slave Narrative of Sarah Debro

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Sarah Debro Location: Durham, North Carolina Age: 90 Years I was bawn in Orange County way back some time in de fifties. Mis Polly White Cain an’ Marse Docter Cain was my white folks. Marse Cain’s plantation joined Mistah Paul Cameron’s land. Marse Cain owned so many niggers dat he didn’ know his own slaves when he met dem in de road. Sometimes he would stop dem an’ say: ‘Whose niggers am you?’ Dey’d say, ‘We’s Marse Cain’s niggers.’ Den he would say, ‘I’se Marse Cain,’ and drive on. Marse Cain was good to his niggers. He didn’ whip dem like some owners did, but if dey done mean he sold dem. Dey knew dis so dey minded him. One day gran’pappy sassed Mis’ Polly White an’ she told him dat if he didn’ ‘have hese’f dat she would put him in her pocket. Gran’pappy wuz er big man an’ I ax him how Mis’ Polly could do dat. He said she meant dat she would sell him den put de money in her pocket. He never did sass Mis’ Polly no more. I was kept at de big house to wait on Mis’ Polly, to tote her basket of keys an’ such as dat. Whenever she seed a chile down in de quarters dat she wanted to raise be hand, she took dem up to do big house an’ trained dem. I wuz to be a house maid. De day she took me my mammy cried kaze she knew I would never be ‘lowed to live at de cabin wid her no more...

Eno Indians

Eno Tribe: Significance unknown, but Speck suggests i’nare, “to dislike,” whence “mean,” “comptemptible”; yeni’nare, “People disliked,”  Haynokes, synonym form Yardley (1645) Eno Connections. The Eno were probably of the Siouan linguistic stock, though, on account of certain peculiarities attributed to them, Mooney (1895) casts some doubt upon this. Their nearest relatives were the Shakori. Eno Location. On Eno River in the present Orange and Durham Counties. (See also South Carolina.) Eno Villages. The only village name recorded, distinct from that of the tribe, is Adshusheer, a town which they shared with the Shakori. It is located by Mooney (1928) near the present Hillsboro. Lawson (1860) speaks in one place as if it were a tribe but as there is no other mention of it, it is more likely that it was simply the name of the town which the Eno and Shakori occupied. Eno History. The Eno are first mentioned by Governor Yeardley of Virginia, who was told that they had valiantly resisted the northward advance of the Spaniards. From this it appears possible that they had formerly lived upon the Enoree River in South Carolina, which lay on the main trail from St. Helena to the Cheraw country at the foot of the Appalachian Mountains. Lederer (1912) mentions them in 1671 and Lawson (1860) in 1701 when they and the Shakori were in the town of Adshusheer. About 1714, together with the Shakori, Tutelo, Saponi, Occaneechi, and Keyauwee, they began to move toward the Virginia settlements. In 1716 Governor Spotswood of Virginia proposed to settle the Eno, Cheraw, and Keyuawee at Eno town “on the very frontiers” of...

Lee Z. Watson

Private, M. G. Btn., Co. B, 6th Div.; of Durham County; son of C. W. and Mrs. H. W. Watson. Entered service May 16, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., transferred to Chickamauga Park, Ga., then to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Sailed for France July 7, 1918. Fought at Alsace-Lorraine Sector, Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA June 19, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 10,...

Joseph A. White

Corpl., F. A., Btry. C, 30th Div., 113th Regt.; of Durham, N.C.; son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. White. Entered service June 19, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 26, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel offensive Sept. 12 to Sept. 15, 1918; Meuse-Argonne offensive Sept. 26 to Oct. 7, 1918; Woevre offensive Nov. 8 to Nov. 11, 1918; Toul defensive Aug. 27th to Sept. 11th; Woevre defensive Oct. 11 to Nov. 7th. Returned to USA March 19, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., March 28,...

Robert C. White

Sergt., M. P., 30th Co., 30th Div.; of Durham, N.C.; son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. White. Entered service June 30, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Fought at Hindenburg Line and Voormizelle. Was Sergt. in Btry. C, 113th F. A., and was transferred to 105th M. P., which was later called the 30th M. P. Co. Returned to USA April 11, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 14,...

C. C. Wilkerson

Sergt. 1st Class, Med. Corps, 81st Div., 312th F. A.; of Durham County; son of W. A. and Mrs. Mary P. Wilkerson. Entered service Oct. 5, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camps Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 13, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 21,...

Charlie V. Wilkins

Mechanic, Co. M, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Durham County; son of C. B. and Mrs. D. Wilkins. Entered service in 1917 at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Killed at Battle of Hindenburg Line Sept. 29, 1918. Buried at Bony Aisne, No. 636, American...

John A. Teague

Corpl., Motor Am. Tr., Co. F, 4th C. A. P. Regt. Born in Durham County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Teague. Husband of Mrs. Gertrude Lenoir Teague. Entered the service June 25, 1918, at Durham, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. Overseas to France Sept. 2, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA June 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 13,...

George M. Temple

Private, 120th Inf., 30th Div., Co. M. Born in Durham County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Temple. Entered the service May 15, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Fought on the Hindenburg Line, near Dicky Bush, at St. Quentin Drive. Received shrapnel wound in the left arm Sept. 29, 1918. Sent to American Base Hospital No. 204 at Winchester, Eng. Returned to the USA Dec. 16, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Greene Feb. 28,...
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