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Descendants of John Folger

John Folger, b. 1590, d. 1660. He came from Norwich in Norfolk in 1635 on the “Abigale” and settled in Dedham, Mass., in 1638, and in Watertown, Mass., in 1640, then went to Martha Vineyard. He married Merible Gibbs. ISSUE: (2) Peter b. (England) 1617, d. Nantucket 1690; m. Mary Morrill in 1640. She was from Salem, Mass.; she came over in the same ship with Peter. (She died in 1704.) ISSUE-(10 children; see Folger Genealogy). One of their sons was John Folger (3), b. 1659; d. Aug. 23, 1732; m. Mary Barnard, daughter of Nathaniel Barnard. John and Mary (Barnard) Folger had children as follows: Nathaniel (3), b. Feb. 18, 1694; d. June 15, 1775; m. Priscilla Chase, Nov. 18, 1718. Priscilla was the daughter of Isaac Chase, born 1647, died at Martha’s Vineyard, 1727, and married Mary Perkins. Isaac Chase was son of Thomas Chase, who died July 25, 1604. His wife was Elizabeth Philbrick. (4) Nathaniel Folger, John Folger (2), Peter (1) and Priscilla (Chase) Folger had daughter, Elizabeth (4); b. 1716, d. Nov. 25. 1795. She married Paul Pease. (See (3) Kelley Genealogy.) (3) Abiah. daughter of Peter (2) and Mary (Morrill) Folger married Josiah Franklin and they had ten children. Their last child was Benjamin Franklin, b. in Boston, Jan. 7, 1706, d. April 17, 1790; m. Deborah Reed, of Philadelphia, Pa., in 1770. (See Descendants of Thomas...

Biography of Ephraim Cutler

Ephraim Cutler, known in the early history of Athens county as Judge Cutler, was the oldest son of Dr. Manasseh Cutler, and was born at Edgartown, Duke’s county; Massachusetts, April 12th, 1767. He did not receive A collegiate education, but, being an industrious reader; he acquired during youth considerable mental culture, and a large store of useful knowledge. From the age of three years he lived with his grandparents, at Killingly, Connecticut, both of whom he was wont to mention in after life with great respect and affection. His grandfather was a pure and pious man, and an ardent patriot. In a sketch written long afterward, Judge Cutler says: “I well remember that the express with the news of the battle of Lexington, which was the commencement of the revolutionary struggle, came directly to my grandfather’s house in the night after the battle. He was in bed, and I slept with him. He arose immediately and fired his gun three times, which was, doubtless, the agreed signal, as it was universally expected that there would be an attack from the British. Before sunrise he, with fifteen others, had started for the battlefield. Before leaving he gave a particular charge to his housekeeper to provide carefully for the wants of any soldier who might call during his absence.” In 1787 Mr. Cutler married Miss Leah Atwood, of Killingly, a lady whose great worth and excellence of character were for many years well known in Athens county. After his marriage he engaged for a few years in mercantile pursuits at Killingly. In 1795 he accepted the agency of the Ohio Company,...

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