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Biography of James K. P. Conner

JAMES K. P. CONNER. The subject of this sketch is a gentleman of ripe intelligence, and a man of large benevolence and broad sympathies. He is a citizen of Jobe, Missouri, and the most efficient postmaster at that place. Mr. Conner is a native Hoosier, born in Dubois County, December 23, 1844, and the son of Rial and Clara (Berry) Conner, natives, respectively, of Tennessee and Illinois. The parents were married in Indiana, and the father died in Dubois County, that State, in 1861. The mother is still living and finds a comfortable home with her children. All his life Mr. Conner was engaged in agricultural pursuits, and met with substantial results. Like many of the representative citizens of the county Mr. Conner was reared to farm life, and remained engaged in the duties on the same until August, 1862, when he joined the Ninety-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company G, as sergeant, and served three years lacking eighteen days. During the war he was in the Southern States, and participated in the battle of Vicksburg, Jackson, Franklin and Nashville, Guntown, Holly Springs, and other battles and skirmishes. June 10, 1864, he received a gunshot wound in the right side, which at the time was pronounced a fatal wound. He was in the hospital at Memphis three months. This was the only wound he received, and he was never taken prisoner. After being wounded he rode 130 miles on the back of a mule to escape being made a prisoner. After the war he engaged in the mill business in Dubois County, Indiana, but four years later went to Washington,...

Biography of James Le Grand, M. D.

JAMES LE GRAND, M. D. In a comprehensive work of this kind, dealing with industrial pursuits, sciences, arts and professions, it is only fit and right that that profession on which, in some period or other of our lives (the medical profession) we are all more or less dependent, should be noticed. It is the prerogative of the physician to relieve or alleviate the ailments to which suffering humanity is heir, and as such he deserves the most grateful consideration of all. A prominent physician, who, by his own ability, has attained distinction in his profession, is Dr. James Le Grand, who was born in Dubois County, Indiana, December 26, 1843, the elder of two children born to John and Sophia (Hanks) Le Grand, the former of whom was born in the Old North State, but who, at an early day, became a resident of Indiana, in which State he married and made his home until 1848. He was the father of eight children by his first wife, whom he lost in the State in which he married her, and he afterward married the widow of Dillon Lynch, who bore him six children. He then wedded Miss Hanks, and by her became the father of two children; James and his sister Rebecca, who is deceased, making in all sixteen children born to him. John Le Grand removed to Missouri during the boyhood of his son James and made his home in St. Francois and Bollinger Counties, dying in the latter about 1872, having always been a prominent member of the Republican party. He held a number of official positions...

Biography of William Hembree

WILLIAM HEMBREE. This well-known business man and successful farmer of James Township, Stone County, Missouri, is a product of the Hoosier State, born in Dubois County, March 9, 1836, to the union of John and Maggie Hembree. The father was born in Knox County, Tennessee, and when a young man went to Indiana, was married in Dubois County, and when our subject was six or ten years of age the family came by horse and ox teams to what is now Taney County, Missouri, locating on Bull Creek, where Mr. Hembree improved a farm. Later he moved to White River in Stone County, and still later, farther up White River, where he made his home until the war broke out. He then removed to a point near Buffalo, in Dallas County, and resided there until peace was declared, when he returned to Stone County, locating just below Galena, where he died soon after. He was a lifelong and successful farmer, and was one of the pioneers of the upper White River country. He was a militiaman during the war, a man whose upright, honorable career commended him to all. His father, Drew Hembree, also came to Taney County and there died when our subject was a boy. He was probably born in Tennessee and was a farmer by occupation. The mother of our subject died in Dallas County during the war. Previous to her marriage to Mr. Hembree, she had married a Mr. Butler, by whom she had three children; John, David and James. Her second union resulted in the birth of seven children as follows: Simeon, who went...

Biography of James W. Brady

Natural talent, acquired ability, determination and energy have brought James W. Brady to a foremost position in the ranks of the legal fraternity of Haskell, where since 1905 he has followed his profession. He has been called upon to fill various public positions of honor and trust and is now capably discharging the duties of city attorney, in which connection he is making a highly commendable record. A native of Indiana, he was born in Dubois county, May 22, 1871, of the marriage of James and Margaret (Payne) Brady, both of whom were born in Tennessee. In 1863 the father removed to Indiana, where he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, first cultivating rented land in Dubois County, after which he went across the line into Perry county. There he entered a tract of government land, which he cleared and developed, and subsequently acquired additional holdings, becoming at length the owner of a valuable and well improved farm. He successfully continued his agricultural operations until his demise, which occurred in March l908 The mother 77 passed of the previous year. James W. Brady pursued his studies in the grammar and high schools of Perry county, Indiana, after which he took up educational work, devoting seven years to teaching. In the meantime he had employed his leisure hours in the study of the principles of jurisprudence and subsequently entered the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated with the class of 1901. However, in 1897 he had been admitted to the bar and had practiced his profession for three years at Connelton, Indiana, previous to his graduation,...

Biography of N. P. Damewood

In a history of the agricultural development of Nebraska township and of Page county mention should be made of N. P. Damewood, who for more than half a century has been identified with the farming interests of this part of the state. His home is situated on the county line and comprises one hundred and two acres. That which lies in Page county is on sections 24 and 25, Nebraska township, while twenty-two acres extend across the boundary line into Dallas township, Taylor county. His life record began in Dubois county, Indiana, November 9, 1852, and in the spring of 1857 he was brought to Iowa by his parents, Isaac and Elizabeth (McFarren) Damewood, who settled in Taylor county. Both the father and mother were natives of east Tennessee, where they were reared and married. They afterward went to Indiana, where two children were born unto them. When they had spent six or eight years in Indiana they determined to seek a home west of the Mississippi and as stated took up their abode in Taylor county. Their last days were spent in Page county where the father served as sheriff for eight consecutive years. He died at the age of seventy-seven years and the mother passed away a year later at the age of seventy-five years. They had a large family of thirteen children: F. A., who for the past twenty-seven years has been a railway mail clerk and is living in Nebraska City; E. C., whose home is in Coin, Iowa, J. H., a resident of Clarinda; Nancy, who died unmarried; N. P., of this review ;...

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