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Slave Narrative of Amsy O. Alexander

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Amsy O. Alexander Location: 2422 Center Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 74 Occupation: Track laborer, Track foreman, Railroad builder [HW: Helps Build Railroad] “I was born in the country several miles from Charlotte in Macklenberg, County, North Carolina in 1864. “My father’s name was John Alexander and my mother was Esther McColley. That was her maiden name of course. “My father’s master was named Silas Alexander and my mother belonged to Hugh Reed. I don’t know just how she and my father happened to meet. These two slaveholders were adjoining neighbors, you might say. “My father and my mother married during the war. I was the first child. I had three half brothers and three half sisters from the father’s side. I didn’t have no whole brothers and sisters. I am the only one on my mother’s side. My father was not in the war. “I don’t know that the pateroles bothered him very much. My father and mother were well treated by our master and then both she and my father were quiet and their masters were good to them naturally. “During slavery times, my father was a farmer. My mother farmed too. She was a hand in the field. They lived in a little log cabin, one room. They had a bed in there, a few chairs and a homemade table. They had a plank floor. I only know what I heard my people speak of. I don’t know what was what for myself because I was too young. “From what I can understand they had a big room at the...

Biography of Charles Proctor

Charles Proctor. The men who came in the early days to Kansas and stuck to their posts in spite of discouragements and setbacks, have with few exceptions gained all the prosperity that a man of ordinary ambition could erave. Such men possessed character as well as the ability to do hard work, and it is not strange that many of the public honors have been given to such citizens. One of this class in Cloud County is Mr. Charles Prostor of Miltonvale. He had lived a long and useful life and is now past fourscore. His years have ripened his judgment, and through all his experiences and relationships he had maintained unsullied a reputation for integrity of character. He was selected by the citizens of Miltonvale and adjacent territory to various offices of trust and responsibility and gave conscientious exactness to every public performance. From 1888 to 1892 he served Cloud County as county clerk for two terms. He was county commissioner one term and on the school board several terms. He established a postoffice one-half mile west of what is now Miltonvale, where he was postmaster until resigning the office to R. T. Modrell. Mr. Proctor was elected the first president of the Home State and now the Drovers State Bank of Miltonvale, and he was succeeded in that position by his son-in-law, Mr. Culp. Charles Proctor was born in Joe Daviess County, Illinois, in the extreme northwest corner of the state, November 10, 1835. His parents, Abel and Mary (Moffett) Proctor, were natives of Vermont and Maine respectively, and came to Galena, Illinois, in 1827 and were married there in 1829. One...

Slave Narrative of Jeff Bailey

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Jeff Bailey Location: 713 W. Ninth Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 76 or 77 Occupation: Hostler [HW: A Hostler’s Story] “I was born in Monticello. I was raised there. Then I came up to Pine Bluff and stayed there thirty-two years. Then I came up here and been here thirty-two years. That is the reason the white folks so good to me now. I been here so long, I been a hostler all my life. I am the best hostler in this State. I go down to the post office they give me money. These white folks here is good to me. “What you writing down? Yes, that’s what I said. These white folks like me and they good to me. They give me anything I want. You want a drink? That’s the best bonded whiskey money can buy. They gives it to me. Well, if you don’t want it now, come in when you do. “I lost my wife right there in that corner. I was married just once. Lived with her forty-three years. She died here five months ago. Josie Bailey! The white folks thought the world and all of her. That is another reason they give me so much. She was one of the best women I ever seen. “I gits ten dollars a month. The check comes right up to the house. I used to work with all them money men. Used to handle all them horses at the post office. They ought to give me sixty-five dollars but they don’t. But I gits along. God is likely to...

Slave Narrative of John W. H. Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: Marianna, Arkansas Age: 81 “I was born at Clinton Parish, Louisiana. I’m eighty-one years old. My parents and four children was sold and left six children behind. They kept the oldest children. In that way I was sold but never alone. Our family was divided and that brought grief to my parents. We was sold on a block at New Orleans. J.J. Gambol (Gamble?) in north Louisiana bought us. After freedom I seen all but one of our family. I don’t recollect why that was. “For three weeks steady after the surrender people was passing from the War and for two years off and on somebody come along going home. Some rode and some had a cane or stick walking. Mother was cooking a pot of shoulder meat. Them blue soldiers come by and et it up. I didn’t get any I know that. They cleaned us out. Father was born at Eastern Shore, Maryland. He was about half Indian. Mother’s mother was a squaw. I’m more Indian than Negro. Father said it was a white man’s war. He didn’t go to war. Mother was very dark. He spoke a broken tongue. “We worked on after freedom for the man we was owned by. We worked crops and patches. I didn’t see much difference then. I see a big change come out of it. We had to work. The work didn’t slacken a bit. I never owned land but my father owned eighty acres in Drew County. I don’t know what become of it. I worked on the railroad section, laid crossties, worked in...

Fennell, Thomas D. – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Thomas D. Fennell, 69, of Sutherlin and formerly of La Grande, died June 11. A memorial service is planned for June 28 in Sutherlin. Chapel of the Roses in Roseburg is in charge of arrangements. Thomas was born June 11, 1939, to Grady and Lorene (Priest) Fennell in Monticello, Ark. In 1947, the Fennell family moved to the Sutherlin area. Thomas graduated from Sutherlin High School in 1957, and enlisted in the Army 87th Airborne unit. He was stationed in Germany and while serving his country enjoyed parachute jumping. After completing his military service, he became a member of the Oregon State Police and lived and worked in La Grande. Thomas returned to Sutherlin and began an excavating business. In the mid-1980s, he bought and developed a business running a service station and store in Evanston, Wyo. In the early 1990s, Thomas retired to Sutherlin and took up his favorite past-times: hunting, fishing and reading the Bible. In the last few years, ill-health curtailed his outdoor activities and limited his excursions. On Dec. 8, 2007, Thomas married Sharon Bjerkbig Hollamon. Thomas is survived by his wife, Sharon Fennell of Sutherlin; daughter, Tammra and her husband, Jack Chess, of La Grande; sister, JoAnn and her husband, Leland Nelson of Bandon; brother, Jack and his wife, Wendy Fennell, of Sutherlin; brother, Troy Fennell of Roseburg; step-children, Doug Hollamon of Anchorage, Alaska, Monty Hollamon and Sheila Hollamon of Sutherlin; and numerous grandchildren, nieces and nephews. La Grande Observer – June 19,...

Drew County, Arkansas Census

Drew County, Arkansas was formed from Arkansas and Bradley counties in 1846. 1850 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1850 Drew County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1850 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Free 1860 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1860 Drew County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1860 Census Index Free 1860 Census Transcription (pdf) Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Free 1870 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial Free 1870 Census Transcription (pdf) 1870 Drew County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Free 1880 Census Transcription Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1880 Drew County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1880 Census Transcription Clear Creek Township Saline Township Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Drew County, Arkansas Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Free 1900 Census Images and...

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