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Biographical Sketch of Elmer E. Morgan

Elmer E. Morgan is a lineal descendant of General Morgan of revolutionary fame. His grandfather, Isaac Morgan, was born in Kentucky in 1879 and fought in the War of 1812. Later he built the first slab house at what is now Dayton, Ohio. He came to Davenport in 1836. Isaac F. Morgan, father of Elmer Morgan, grew to manhood in the vicinity of Davenport, married Sarah E. Williams, a Tennessee lady, and settled near DeWitt, Clinton County, Iowa. There the subject of this sketch was born September 13, 1861. His early life was spent on his father’s farm and his opportunities for schooling were few. In later life by consistent, painstaking study, he obtained an excellent education, and one which he was able to turn to practical account. At the age of twenty-three Mr. Morgan sought wider fields of endeavor and took up his residence in Moline, then just beginning to show promise of becoming a great manufacturing city. He began reading law in the office of William A. Meese and soon there-after opened a collection agency, which he still conducts and which is the oldest one in this part of the State. Mr. Morgan has traveled extensively in the United States and Europe. In 1896 he toured France, Holland and the British Isles on a bicycle. He was one of the founders of the Unitarian Church in Moline and remains a leading member of that institution. Politically he is a Republican and exerts consider-able influence in the party. He is a member of Doric Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons; the Eastern Star; Benevolent and Protective Order of...

Biography of Albert P. Crandall

Albert P. Crandall came to Western Kansas at the age of fourteen, spent many years of his active life in the railway service, had also been a farmer, and is now cashier of the Little River State Bank and had recently completed a term as mayor of that municipality. These and other interests identify him very closely and make his name well known throughout Rice County. Mr. Crandall is of pioneer New York State stock, but the family in successive generations have moved their residence westward from the eastern side of the Alleghenies to the west of the Mississippi. E. Crandall, father of Albert P., was born in Dearborn County in Southern Indiana in 1822. He grew up and married in his native county, took up farming, and in 1856 moved to the new state of Iowa, locating at DeWitt in Clinton County. He farmed there also and in 1868 went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and in 1879 to Little River, Kansas, where he had farming interests and where he lived until his death in 1888. He was a republican, a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church and very active in its behalf and belonged to the Masonic fraternity. His wife was Minerva Laycock, who was born in Ripley County, Indiana, in 1826 and died in Little River, Kansas, in 1888, the same year as her husband. They had a large family of children: John R., who was a retired farmer when he died at Ness City, Kansas; Marilla, who died in Linn County, Iowa, in 1880, wife of Charles Crawford, a farmer who died in 1907; Indiana, who...

Biography of William I. Plumb

William I. Plumb, who had given the best years of his life to merchandising, had been a resident of Newton for many years and is well known in the business and civic affairs of that city. Mr. Plumb is a cousin of the late Senator Preston B. Plumb, one of the most famous figures in Kansas history. However, he belongs to a branch of the family which lived outside this state until he himself came to Newton about twenty-five years ago. His grandfather was Maj. Ichabod Plumb, also grandfather of Senator Plumb. Major Ichabod was a wagon maker and blacksmith and died at Berkshire, Ohio, in 1850. Zenas Plumb, father of William I., was born at Berkshire, Ohio, in 1820, grew up there, and for several years followed his trade as a wagon and carriage maker at Columbus, Ohio, where he was employed by the United States Stage Company and the Booth Carriage Company. In 1859 he moved to DeWitt, Iowa, where he resumed work at his trade but in 1861 enlisted in Company D of the Twenty-sixth Iowa Infantry. He was with that regiment in all its battles and campaigns until the close of the war. Among other experiences he was at the siege of Vicksburg, and participated in one of the famous incidents of that siege. It will be recalled that a spring of water within range of the Confederate guns was the only source of water supply for the thirsty Federals, and many of them risked their lives to satisfy their thirst. Zenas Plumb was one that secured a drink at the spring, and escaped with...

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