Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

War Between the Colonies and The Western Indians – From 1763 To 1765

A struggle began in 1760, in which the English had to contend with a more powerful Indian enemy than any they had yet encountered. Pontiac, a chief renowned both in America and Europe, as a brave and skillful warrior, and a far-sighted and active ruler, was at the head of all the Indian tribes on the great lakes. Among these were the Ottawas, Miamis, Chippewas, Wyandott, Pottawatomie, Winnebago, Shawanese, Ottagamie, and Mississagas. After the capture of Quebec, in 1760, Major Rodgers was sent into the country of Pontiac to drive the French from it. Apprised of his approach, Pontiac sent ambassadors to inform him that their chief was not far off, and desired him to halt until he could see him “with his own eyes.” When Pontiac met the English officer, he demanded to know the business which had brought him into his country, and how he dared to enter it without his permission. The major told him he had no designs against the Indians, but only wished to expel the French; and at the same time, he delivered him several belts of wampum. Pontiac replied, “I stand in the path you travel until tomorrow morning,” and gave the major a belt. This communication was understood to mean, that the intruder was not to march further without his leave. Next day, the English detachment was plentifully supplied with provisions by the Indians, and Pontiac giving the commander the pipe of peace, assured him that he might pass through his country unmolested, and that he would protect him and his party. As an earnest of his friendship, he sent one...

Detroit’s Original Colonists

On the accompanying map I have placed numbers on the various lots to conform to the report made by Cadillac. They do not agree with the order of alienation, but all the transfers were made between 1707 and 1710. The names of the purchasers, arranged according to the numbers on the map, are also given, with the consideration for each parcel. The names are sometimes indefinite, for these Frenchmen had curious habits of changing their name, passing by different names at different times, and even in the little village Cadillac did not seem to know the first names of all his people, as frequent references are made such as “a man named Rencontre,” “a man named Beauregard.” Generally, when a parcel of land was conveyed, there were two items in the consideration required. First, a fixed rental, payable every year and probably accepted in lieu of all taxes, except the tithes for maintaining the church, and second, a certain sum which Cadillac required for privileges extended to the purchaser, as for instance, suppose the purchaser was a blacksmith, Cadillac having the exclusive right of trading at the post, would grant this purchaser the right of black-smithing to the exclusion of all others, and would receive an extra compensation for this privilege. The ownership of the land remained in Cadillac, and no man was entitled to his lot unless he took and maintained actual possession of it. If he abandoned it, it reverted to Cadillac, and he sold it to some other person. From references in some of the conveyances, it appears that there were transfers made to parties not...

Biographical Sketch of Rev. W. A. Brewer

No man has been more closely identified with the growth and best interests of San Mateo County than Rev. W. A. Brewer, Mayor of Hillsborough and, until its discontinuance a few months ago, rector of St. Matthew’s Military School. Mr. Brewer is known throughout the State for his tireless energy in putting the county in the foreground. He was one of the organizers and the first president of the San Mateo County Development Association. As its executive he contributed perhaps more than any one individual in putting this organization on its firm basis and in bringing about the achievements and accomplishments for the good of the county that marked its first year. As Hillsborough’s first and only Mayor, Mr. Brewer has given his town a progressive and business-like administration that has made it a model in city government. Mr. Brewer was active in bringing about Hillsborough’s incorporation and was one of the leading figures in many conferences that preceded the molding of the scattered countryside into an ideal suburban city. Rev. W. A. Brewer was born in Detroit, Michigan on June 2, 1863. In September 1895 he was married in San Francisco to Miss Ellen Douglas Wheaton. He has two sons, William Augustus, Jr., aged 15, and Wheaton Hale, 18, a student in the University of California. Mr. Brewer is an Episcopal clergyman and is now pastor of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in...

Biographical Sketch of Paul J. Strahle

Paul J. Strahle is one of the younger business men of Champaign, is active and aggressive, and has already acquired a secure position as a unit in the commercial community. A native of Champaign, he was born February 20, 1892, the only son and child of John G. and Catherine (Dawson) Strahle. His mother was born in England and died at Champaign, March 1, 1912. John G. Strahle is also a native of Champaign County, was for a number of years a tailor by trade, but is now associated with his son in business. Educated in the public schools of Champaign, Paul J. Strahle early evinced a strong inclination and tendency for mechanical pursuits and he served an apprenticeship which in itself constituted the equivalent of a technical university course. For a time he was in the engineering department of the Cadillac Company at Detroit, also with the Studebaker Company, and from there removed to Dayton. Ohio, and had a thorough course of training in the engineering departments of the Delco plant. Mr. Strahle is an expert electrician and is master of practically every technical detail connected with the construction, assembling and repair of automobiles. In March, 1915, he engaged in business for himself at Champaign in electrical supplies and garage. He is now manager and proprietor of the Willard Service Station there. Mr. Strahle is unmarried. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Methodist Episcopal...

Biography of John Baptist Miege

John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and from the Missouri River west to the Rocky Mountains, being consecrated to that office March 25, 1851, at St. Louis, under the title of Bishop of Messenie. On the 11th of the following May he arrived at St. Mary’s, Territory of Kansas, where he built the first Catholic Church in the great stretch...

Biography of Charles Wood Davis

A significantly varied, distinguished and interesting career was that of the late Charles Wood Davis, and fortunate it was for the State of Kansas that he early established his residence within its borders, for his splendid initiative and executive powers came most effectively into play in the furtherance of the eivic, industrial and general material development and progress of this commonwealth. He was one of the famous argonauts of the year 1849 in California, was long and prominently identified with railway interests, was a recognized authority in all matters pertaining to the basic industry of agriculture, was a pioneer in the exploiting of the coal-mining industry in Kansas, and there seemed to be no bounds set about his constructive energy and broad-minded public spirit. By very reason of his two personal names he became widely known and highly honored throughout the Middle West by the sobriquet of “Cotton Wood Davis.” He was one of the venerable and honored pioneer citizens of Sedgwick County, Kansas, at the time of his death, and it is signally fitting that in this history of the state and its people be entered a tribute to the memory of this strong, resourceful and noble man. Charles Wood Davis was born at South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, on the 17th of April, 1832, and was a scion of the staunchest of colonial stock in New England, where his ancestors had been prominently concerned with the shipbuilding industry as well as with general seafaring activities, the original American progenitor having landed on the Massachusetts coast in the year 1630. John Davis, a minuteman of the Colonial forces in the...

Slave Narrative of Sam McAllum

Interviewer: Marjorie Woods Austin Person Interviewed: Sam McAllum Location: Meridian, Mississippi Date of Birth: September 2, 1842 Age: 95 Place of Residence: Meridian, Lauderdale County To those familiar with the history of “Bloody Kemper” as recorded, the following narrative from the lips of an eye-witness will be heresy. But the subject of this autobiography, carrying his ninety-five years more trimly than many a man of sixty, is declared sound of mind as well as of body by the Hector Currie family, prominent in Mississippi, for whom he has worked in a position of great trust and responsibility for fifty years or more. While this old Negro may be mistaken at some points (the universal failing of witnesses), his impressions are certainly not more involved than the welter of local records. Mrs. Currie states that if Sam said he saw a thing happen thus, it may be depended upon that he is telling exactly what he really saw. Sam McAllum, ex-slave, lives in Meridian, Lauderdale County. Sam is five feet three inches tall and weighs 140 pounds. “De firs’ town I ever seen were DeKalb in Kemper County. De Stephenson Plantation where I were born warnt but ’bout thirteen miles north o’ DeKalb. I were born de secon’ o’ September in 1842. My mammy b’longed to de Stephensons an’ my pappy b’longed to Marster Lewis Barnes. His plantation wasn’t so very far from Stephenson. De Stephensons an’ Barneses were kin’ white people. My pappy were a old man when I were born—I were de baby chil’. After he died, my mammy marry a McAllum Nigger. “Dey were ’bout thirty slaves...

Slave Narrative of John Cameron

Person Interviewed: John Cameron Location: Jackson, Mississippi Date of Birth: 1842 John Cameron, ex-slave, lives in Jackson. He was born in 1842 and was owned by Howell Magee. He is five feet six inches tall, and weighs about 150 pounds. His general coloring is blackish-brown with white kinky hair. He is in fairly good health. “I’se always lived right here in Hinds County. I’s seen Jackson grow from de groun’ up. “My old Marster was de bes’ man in de worl’. I jus’ wish I could tell, an’ make it plain, jus’ how good him an’ old Mistis was. Marster was a rich man. He owned ’bout a thousand an’ five hund’ed acres o’ lan’ an’ roun’ a hund’ed slaves. Marster’s big two-story white house wid lightning rods standin’ all ’bout on de roof set on top of a hill. “De slave cabins, ‘cross a valley from de Big House, was built in rows. Us was ‘lowed to sing, play de fiddles, an’ have a good time. Us had plenty t’ eat and warm clo’es an’ shoes in de winter time. De cabins was kep’ in good shape. Us aint never min’ workin’ for old Marster, cause us got good returns. Dat meant good livin’ an’ bein’ took care of right. Marster always fed his slaves in de Big House. “De slaves would go early to de fiel’s an work in de cotton an’ corn. Dey had different jobs. “De overseers was made to un’erstan’ to be ‘siderate of us. Work went on all de week lak dat. Dey got off from de fiel’s early on Satu’d’y evenin’s, washed...

Biography of Bert R. Parrot

Bert R. Parrott, a mechanical engineer and one of the directors of the Dorris Motors Corporation of St. Louis, was born in Mendon, Ohio, in December, 1873, his parents being Joseph J. and Harriet (Waters) Parrott. The father was a native of Virginia and was of French descent. The mother was born in Ohio belonging to one of the old families of Columbus, Ohio, whose founder was Mitchell Waters, the grandfather of Mrs. Parrott and recognized at one time as the merchant prince of that city. He established the first department store in that section of the country and in the course of years developed a business of mammoth proportions. The Waters family was of Scotch and English extraction. Mrs. Parrott died in 1908 at the age of sixty-four years and the death of Mr. Parrott occurred December 4, 1909, when he was seventy-eight years of age. He had followed farming and stock raising in Ohio for many years and during the last twenty-six years of his life lived retired in Battle Creek, Michigan. To him and his wife were born three sons and two daughters, of whom Bert R. Parrott is the fourth in order of birth. In the public schools of Ohio and Michigan Bert R. Parrott pursued his early education and afterward studied in Battle Creek College at Battle Creek, Michigan. When eighteen years of age he took up the study of mechanical engineering with W. Q. Reynolds at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, a branch of Battle Creek College, Mr. Reynolds being chief engineer, in charge of both the mechanical and electrical engineering departments of the...

Biography of J. F. Otto Reller

J. F. Otto Reller, a representative of real estate interests in St. Louis, has the unique distinction of carrying on business in the same house in which he was born, his natal day being July 7, 1864. His father, August F. Reller, was a native of Hanover, Germany, and came to America in 1839 in company with his parents, when he was but three years of age. After attaining adult years he was engaged in the grocery and feed business and long remained an active factor in the commercial circles of this city, in which he passed away in 1907. He married Anna Marie Appel, also a native of Germany, but who was brought to America by her parents when quite young, their marriage being celebrated in St. Louis in 1861. They had a family of three sons and three daughters. J. F. Otto Reller, the second in order of birth was educated in the parochial schools, in Walther College, and in the Jones Commercial College, while still later he pursued the course of law in the Sprague Law College of Detroit, Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1907, with a very high standing in his class. During that time he was engaged in the grocery and feed business in connection with his father and remained in that association until 1908, when he turned his attention to the real estate business and through the intervening period of more than twelve years has remained active as a real estate operator. He knows thoroughly the value of property and what is on the market and his enterprise and diligence have...
Page 2 of 812345678

Pin It on Pinterest