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Brewer, Harry P. – Obituary

Harry Brewer, 80, Greeley, died Saturday, Dec. 19, at Fort Collins Heath Care Center. He was born Feb. 7, 1907 [headstone says 10th] to Ernest N. and Maude (Parkhurst) Brewer in Oskaloosa, Iowa. On June 4, 1939, he married Hazel Lee in Fremont, Iowa. She died Feb. 12, 1978. On April 18, 1978, he married Fern Lakey in Fort Collins. Mr. Brewer grew up in Iowa. He entered the U.S. Navy on Jan. 23, 1942, in Des Moines, Iowa. He was an aviation chief radio technician. He was discharged on Sept. 14, 1945, at the U.S. Naval Training and Distribution Center. After his discharge, he came to Greeley and worked for H. E. Green and KFKA. In 1969 he founded KUAD in Windsor, where he served as chief engineer for 23 years. His son, Phil, purchased the station in 1976. He was a member of Greeley Lodge No. 909 Loyal Order of the Moose, Greeley Lodge No. 809 BPOE, American Legion, and the United Commercial Travelers for 60 years. He was a life member of Pioneer Post No. 2121 VFW. Survivors are his wife, Fern, of Greeley; a daughter, Mrs. Jacob (Ellen) Kerbs of Platteville; a stepdaughter, Donna Anderson of Greeley; a son Philip L. of Windsor; a stepson, Marvin Anderson of Greeley; two sisters, Lola Brewer of Rochelle, Ill., and Edith Johnson of Sioux City, Iowa; six grandchildren; nine step grandchildren; and three step great grandchildren. Services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Adamson memorial Chapel. Interment will be in Sunset Memorial Gardens with Pioneer Post No. 2121 VFW. Contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s Disease in...

Armon, Samuel D.

Wallowa, Wallowa County, Oregon Retired Farmer And Logger Dies At Enterprise Hospital Samuel D. Armon, a retired logger and farmer of Wallowa who had been in failing health for several weeks, passed away Friday, Sept. 12, 1975 at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. He was born July 31, 1888, near Des Moines Iowa, son of James Harvey and Frances Armon, and he had lived in Wallowa County since 1906. He was married on Jan. 1, 1911, at Enterprise to Melvina Mae Lortie, who preceded him in death on Aug. 6, 1975. He is survived by one son, Wayne, of Enterprise, three daughters, Mrs. Wilbur (Charlotte) Weaver and Mrs. Norman (Carol) Barton of Wallowa and Mrs. Glen (Carmen) Prince of Enterprise, and 15 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren. Memorial services were conducted by the Bollman Funeral Home on Tuesday at 8 p.m. at the Wallowa Christian Church with Richard Jenks officiating. Organist was Mary Ann Jenks and soloist was Jo Woodward who sang “In The Garden” and “Beyond The Sunset”. Casket bearers were: Jim Ronsavell, Velpeau Moore, Florian DeJean, Wendell Weaver, Joe Preso and Keith Weaver. Vault interment was in the Bramlet Memorial Cemetery. Wallowa County Chieftain, Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Thursday September 18, 1975. Contributed by: Robert...

Biography of Byron Judd, Hon.

Hon. Byron Judd was a pioneer of Wyandotte County. He established his home in the village of Wyandotte in November, 1857, when Kansas was still a territory. He lived in the village, his capacities expanding with the growth of the community, and his personal position and influence rising as Wyandotte County grew and prospered, and at his death on July 27, 1909, it was generally recognized and appreciated that he was one of the men who had left a permanent impress for good upon Kansas City, Kansas, a great city of which his old home village of Wyandotte had in the meantime become an integral part. He was nearly eighty-five years of age at the time of his death. He was born at Otis in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, August 13, 1824, a son of Ardon and Sarah (Hubbard) Judd. Both parents lived out their lives in Massachusetts, and both were members of pioneer New England families. Byron Judd spent his youth in the Berkshire Hills. He tried his muscle in cultivating the rough and stony ground of that section. He attended the common schools, also the academy at Southwick, and completed his education in the Massachusetts State Normal School at Westfield. For a time he was a teacher in Massachusetts. He was about thirty-one years of age when he set out for the West. His first home was at Des Moines, Iowa, where he served a year as deputy county recorder. Thon toward the close of 1857 he arrived in that part of Kansas which was ever afterwards his home. He was one of the early land agents and...

Biography of David Adam Kline

David Adam Kline, member of the Muskogee bar engaged in the general practice of law, was born in Marion county, Iowa, June 4, 1874, a son of Lloyd Thomas and Magdalena (Vicinus) Kline. The father was a contractor and builder, devoting his life to that pursuit in order to provide for his family. He moved with his family from Marion county to Des Moines, Iowa, in 1882, and to Chicago, Illinois, in 1887. David A. Kline after completing his high school education and work in the University Academy, later engaged in the study of law. He pursued his studies at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the State University, and the Chicago Law School, completing his professional training under some of the best instructors of the country. He served as librarian of the United States circuit court of appeals for the seventh circuit, at Chicago, for three years. On the 2nd day of May, 1907, Mr. Kline came to Muskogee, and was admitted to practice in the United States court for the western district of the Indian Territory and subsequently in the state of Oklahoma. He made a special study of land titles in the eastern part of Oklahoma, devoting most of his time to this branch of-the law. He is regarded as an authority on land titles and has displayed marked ability in his special work. He belongs to the Muskogee and Oklahoma Bar Associations, and has been admitted to practice in the United States court, so that he is qualified for practice in any court of the land. On the 17th day of September, 1910, Mr. Kline was united...

Trainor, Mrs. Guillia – Obituary

Joseph, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. Guillia Trainor passed away at the Sheets Hotel last Saturday morning after a long illness. She was a pioneer of Wallowa County, having lived here since 1883. Guillia Scott was born in Des Moines, Iowa, Jan. 10, 1870 and died in Joseph Feb. 6, 1937, aged 67 years, 26 days. She came by covered wagon with her family when a small child and after living in Milton a short time the Scott family came to Wallowa County. She was married Sept. 10, 1885 to Allen J. Kutch and to this union was born Mrs. Belle Vesta Isley and William Frank Kutch. She married Charles Turnbow here in 1901 and to this union four children were born, three of whom survive her. They are John Turnbow of Joseph, Mrs. Daisy Marti of Cambridge, Idaho, and Mrs. Nellie Neiman of Fruita. One child died in infancy. Besides her children Mrs. Trainor leaves to mourn her loss 19 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. One sister, Mrs. Belle Conrad of La Grande, four brothers, Sam Scott of Lewiston, Ida., William Scott of Parma, Idaho, Henry Scott of Parma, Idaho and Ed Scott of Stites, Idaho. Funeral services were held in the Joseph M.E. Church Sunday at 2 o’clock p.m. with Rev. G.R. Archer officiating. Internment in Prairie Creek Cemetery, The casket was covered with beautiful flowers, the tribute of family and friends. Source: Enterprise Record Chieftain, March 11, 1937, Page 3 Contributed by: Sue...

Biography of Mary Pearl Smith, D. O.

Mary Pearl Smith, D. O. The theory upon which osteopathy rests is that most diseases and pains are due to some mechanical interference not permitting a free flow of forces and nourishment between the parts of the human anatomy so as to establish normal tissue and harmony of conditions. This adjustment theory had long since passed the experimental stage, and osteopathy is now a widely recognized science. It is a sane factor in lessening the suffering of mankind, and through it, in many thousands of cases, there had been re-established harmony of conditions and action known as health. A capable and enthusiastic exponent of this school of healing is Mary Pearl Smith, D. O., whose professional career had been characterized by truly remarkable results. She had been a resident of Fredonia since January, 1914, and during three years had built up a large and representative practice. Doctor Smith was born at Jefferson, Montgomery County, Kansas, July 27, 1887, and is a daughter of Emery Erwin and Mabel Dean (Simpson) Smith. She traces her lineage to an English family which came to America and settled in New York during the days of the colonies. Her paternal grandfather was Ephraim Lynn Smith, who was born about 1832 in Southern Indiana, where he grew to manhood. Later he became a pioneer farmer near Carlyle, Allen County, Kansas, in 1866, and then near Jefferson, Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1874. He continued farming until he retired, then taking up his residence at Jefferson, and his death occurred in 1910 while on a visit to Hitchcock, South Dakota. He was a republican and a member...

Biography of Samuel C. Varner

Samuel C. Varner, a retired banker and merchant at Moran, is a veteran of the Civil war, and was one of the earliest business men to locate in Moran. His paternal ancestors came out of Germany and were colonial settlers in Pennsylvania. Samuel C. Varner was born in Pennsylvania at Monongahcla on December 10, 1845. His grandfather, John Varner, was born in the eastern part of that state at Lancaster, was a cabinet maker by trade, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and spent most of his years at Monongahela City and at Pittsburg. He married Elizabeth McKnight, of Maysville, Kentucky. She died at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. John McKnight Varner, father of Samuel C., was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1817. He spent his early life at Pittsburg, was married at Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, and then lived for a number of years at Monongahela City. In early life he was a glass blower by trade, subsequently became a merchant, and in March, 1857, he came west and located at Canton in Fulton County, Illinois. After coming to Illinois he followed the trade of painter. In 1867 he went to Bushnell, Illinois, and that city was his home the rest of his life. However, he died while on a visit to Moran, Kansas, in October, 1895. He was laid to rest at his old home in Bushnell. Though quite an old man at the time he did a gallant service as a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war. He enlisted in 1862 in the One Hundred and Third Illinois Infantry and was in service three years,...

Biography of William George Jack, M. D.

William George Jack, M. D. Though born and reared on a farm and spending most of his early years in the vicinity of Chautauqua, William G. Jack had an early ambition for a professional career and gratified it after a thorough course in colleges and clinics and for the past fifteen years had successfully practiced as a physician and surgeon at Chautauqua. He is regarded as one of the best informed physicians and most skillful surgeons in this section of the state. A resident of Chautauqua County since he was nine years of age, William George Jack was born in Des Moines, Iowa, July 24, 1874. His father A. J. Jack was born in Scotland in 1831, and in 1833 was brought to Ameriea by his parents who settled near Coshocton, Ohio. In that Ohio community he grew up and married, and becoming a carpenter and builder followed that trade in both Ohio and Iowa. In 1883 he came to Kansas and was one of the earliest contractors and builders in the Town of Chautauqua. For a number of years he also conducted a lumber yard and hardware business in that town, but giving up his commercial activities he retired in 1903 to his farm a mile northwest of Chautauqua, where he now lives. He is eighty-five years of age and had had a long and useful career. During the Civil war he served as a member of the Iowa State Guards. He is a republican, having become affiliated with that party when it was first organized. His church is the Presbyterian. The maiden name of his wife was...

Southwick, Arthur – Obituary

Wallowa, Oregon Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Southwick of Promise received word that their son, Arthur, who was a Corporal in Company A, 14th Infantry was seriously ill with pneumonia. They immediately left for Fort Dodge near Des Moines where he was stationed. Monday word came that he had died of pneumonia following an attack of Spanish Influenza. Wire was immediately dispatched to them and they were over taken at Sidney, Nebr. and returned home at once. The body will be sent to Wallowa for burial by the government. Wallowa County Reporter, Thursday October 17, 1918 Monday morning Corporal Hughes of the 14th Infantry arrived from Camp Dodge, Iowa, with the body of Corporal Arthur Patterson Southwick who died October 13th of pneumonia following an attack of Spanish Influenza. Three years ago he enlisted in the regular army and served for eighteen months when he was discharged for physical disability. When war with Germany was declared he enlisted at once being the first volunteer from Wallowa county. He was sent to Alaska. Last winter he was made a Corporal and was just ready for a position as Sergeant when he was taken ill. His company had just returned from Alaska and he was taken from the train at Camp Dodge, Illinois. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday, Oct. 22, from the Methodist church conducted by Rev. Pratt of the M.E. church and Rev. Jasper Bogue of the Christian church. Interment was made in Wallowa cemetery. Members of the company of the state militia at Enterprise were present and accompanied the body to the grave giving all military honors....

Conner, C. W. – Obituary

Mrs. H.H. Hug and Mrs. I. Denham received a telegram Wednesday morning from Des Moines, Iowa, conveying the sad news of the death of their father, C.W. Conner, which occurred Tuesday, Sept 12. Mr. Conner had been ill for several months and died from paralysis. Elgin Recorder Friday September 15,...
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