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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830;1 pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts2 or Wichita, and the Kiowa tribe, who came east as far as the Washita and Blue rivers; these Indians had also evinced a hostile attitude toward white citizens and had attacked and plundered Santa Fe traders, trappers, and other unprotected travelers. A party of twelve traders had left Santa Fe in December, 1832, under Judge Carr of Saint Louis for their homes in Missouri. Their baggage and about ten thousand dollars in specie were packed upon mules. They were descending the Canadian River when, near the present town of Lathrop in the Panhandle of Texas, they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Comanche and Kiowa Indians. Two of the men, one named Pratt, and the other Mitchell, were killed; and after a siege of thirty-six hours the survivors made their escape at night on foot, leaving all their property in possession of the Indians. The party became separated and after incredible hardship and suffering five of them made their way to the Creek settlements on the Arkansas and to Fort Gibson where they found succor. Of the other five only two survived. The money secured by the Indians was the first they had ever seen.3 Colonel Arbuckle on May 6, ordered4 a military force to Red...

Biography of John Shackford Kimball

John Shackford Kimball was an enterprising lawyer of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Ia. A son of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, Pembroke, N.H., April 28, 1812. His descent from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came through David Kimball of the second generation and David Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. The fifth generation is now represented by John Stevens Kimball. Mr. Kimball’s parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving nine children-Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle (widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord ), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Ia. ), and Harriet. Of these Sarah and Mary are living. Mary, who was about five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde & Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, N.H., who survived him with one daughter, Sarah Underwood Kimball. Mother and daughter are now residents of Hopkinton, the latter being the present librarian of the Hopkinton Free Library. When a young man, John Shackford Kimball went to Concord and worked in a bakery. Afterward he...

Biographical Sketch of Eugene F. Ware

Eugene F. Ware, a soldier of Iowa, a lawyer and public man of Kansas, and an author both of that state and Missouri, was born at Hartford, Connecticut, May 29, 1841. His parents moved to Burlington, Iowa, in his childhood and he was educated in the public schools of that place. During the Civil war he reached the rank of captain in the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. He took a section of land in Cherokee County, Kansas, in 1867, studied law and was admitted to the bar at Fort Scott and to the United States Supreme Court; entered the law firm of McComas & McKeighan at Fort Scott; in 1874 married Miss Jeanette P. Huntington of Rochester, New York, and was for many years editor of the Fort Scott Monitor. His political career consisted of two terms in the Kansas Legislature, 1879 to 1883, and three years as United States pension commissioner– 1902 to 1905. He was prominent in the republican party; was a delegate to two of its national conventions; was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Bar Association, the Loyal Legion and the Society of the Mayflower Descendants. His home for some years was at Topeka, from which place he moved to Kansas City, Kansas, about 1909 where he practiced law in partnership with his son until the spring of 1911 when both retired to the Ware farm in Cherokee County. Mr. Ware died on July 1, 1911, at Cascade, Colorado. He was the author of “The Rise and Fall of the Saloon,” 1900; “The Lyon Campaign and History of the First Iowa Infantry,”...

Biography of Gray C. Briggs, M.D.

Dr. Gray C. Briggs, a well known Roentgenologist, was born in Burlington, Iowa. June 30, 1882, a son of Dr. Waldo Briggs, who became a noted surgeon of St. Louis. He was born at Bowling Green, Kentucky, July 3, 1856, his parents being William Thompson and Anna (Stubbins) Briggs. He won his professional degree on the completion of a course in the medical department of the University of Nashville, at Nashville, Tennessee, and in 1877 began practice in St. Louis. From 1895 until 1898 he was professor of surgery in Beaumont Medical College and in the latter year accepted the professorship of surgery in the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, since continuing in this position. He is also superintendent of Jefferson Hospital and is president and dean of the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He wedded Nellie Gray, a native of Jamestown, New York, who passed away at the age of forty-five years. Dr. Gray C. Briggs, their only child, was educated in the public schools of St. Louis and the Central high school, after which he became a student in the University of Chicago and later attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons of St. Louis, from which he was graduated in 1909 with the M. D. degree. Following his graduation he spent the first year at clinical work in the college and then entered upon private practice, in which he continued until 1912. In that year he took up special X-ray work in which he has since engaged and is now widely known as...

Biography of Justin E. Joy

Justin E. Joy, a prominent lumberman of Missouri, who always deserves mention in a history of the state as the one who was practically the builder of Webster Groves, was born at Oquaqua Junction, Iowa, June 17, 1844, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Edward Joy, who removed to Burlington, Iowa, during the infancy of their son. There the father operated a sash and door factory for many years, or until 1874, when he removed with his family to St. Louis and in subsequent years was employed as superintendent of building by his son Justin. The latter was educated in the schools of Burlington and in the public schools of Denmark, Iowa, from which he was graduated. He later became associated with his brother, James P., and their father in the planing mill and lumber business, organizing tile firm of Joy Brothers & Company. Justin E. Joy became the moving spirit in thin firm, tile success of the enterprise being attributable in large measure to his efforts, his diligence and his powers of organization. In 1873 or 1874 the business was transferred to North St. Louis, where their trade developed to large proportions. Justin E. Joy brought down the Mississippi river the largest lumber fleet ever carried down the river. He closely studied the lumber market and the conditions governing the business and developed his interests along the most progressive lines. He became a big operator in connection with the lumber business, nor was his attention confined alone to this line, far he was the pioneer in the development of Old Orchard, now Webster Groves, being practically the builder...

Biography of Col. Homer F. Fellows

In these days of money-making, when life is a constant struggle between right and wrong, it is a pleasure to lay before an intelligent reader the unsullied record of an honorable man. To the youthful it will be a useful lesson, an incentive to honest industry. Col. Homer F. Fellows is acknowledged by all to be one of Springfield’s most public-spirited and honorable citizens. He has been largely identified with the public enterprises of that city, is a promoter of its improvements and the real founder of one of the largest mechanical industries in this part of the State. He springs from old Colonial stock, and is of English-Puritan extraction, two brothers of that name, John and Drane, having emigrated from England in old Colonial times. John Fellows, grandfather of our subject, was born in the town of Canaan, Conn., where his ancestors had settled, and served in the Revolutionary War, fighting bravely for independence. His wife, whose maiden name was Edna Deibold, was a native of Canaan, and came of French extraction. After marriage this worthy couple moved to Luzerne County, Penn., and settling on a farm went actively to work to make many improvements in their new home. Indians were very plentiful at that time. About 1820 Mr. Fellows moved with his family to Tioga County, Penn., and there he passed the remainder of his days, dying at the good old age of eighty-three years. He reared a family of six children: Horace, Asahel, Erastus, Merritt, Eliza and Hulda. As a man of intelligence and as one of the first citizens of his town he was well...

Biography of Samuel H. Waddle

Samuel H. Waddle is now the oldest original settler in his locality of Saline County. He went there more than fifty years ago. He knew Central Kansas when it was an almost unlimited stretch of prairie. The buffalo and the Indians were still here and the frontier civilization was a straggling line of homestead shacks and habitations, putting up a bold front against the domain of the wilderness. He suffered those privations due to searcity of crops, isolation from large towns and settlements, and he experienced the prairie fires, the long continued drought, the grasshoppers and every other plague and hardship so frequently recounted in these pages. Mr. Waddle was a young man, only a short time previously having been released from the army, when he came to Kansas. He had grown to a hearty old age in this state, and his exertions have made him financially independent. He is one of the leading farmers and stock raisers in the vicinity of Solomon. Mr. Waddle was born November 22, 1844, in a log house on a farm in Des Moines County, Iowa. His parents were William and Sarah (Braden) Waddle. William Waddle was born in Fayette County, Ohio, in 1809 and died at Topeka, Kansas, October 4, 1889. He came to Kansas in 1866, at the same time as his son Samuel, and acquired a tract of government land in Saline County nine miles southwest of Solomon. He improved that claim and lived there the rest of his active years. In 1834 William Waddle married Miss Braden, who was born in Fayette County, Ohio, in 1816. She died February...

Biography of F. C. Amsbary

F. C. Amsbary, superintendent and manager of the Champaign Waterworks, has been superintending waterworks plants in different parts of the country for upwards of thirty years. It has in fact been his regular profession, though some of his younger years were devoted to railroading. Mr. Amsbary has numerous connections that identify him with the substantial interests of his home city. A native of Illinois, he was born at Pekin, January 24, 1863, a son of William Wallace and Harriet E. (Harlow) Amsbary, both of whom are natives of New York State. William W. Amsbary moved to Champaign in 1907, and for several years was connected with the waterworks here. He died in 1911, and his widow is still living at Champaign. Their five children are: George E., of Urbana; F. C.; Wallace Bruce, of Chicago; Don H., of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Cordelia, still at home with her mother. When F. C. Amsbary was four years of age his parents removed to Delavan in Tazewell County, Illinois. He attended the local schools there, and at the age of fifteen he left home and worked as clerk in a store at Tremont in the same county for two years. He then went to Peoria and acquired his initial experience in railroad offices, where he remained about three years. He was next at Council Bluffs, Iowa, in the Chicago Northwestern Railway offices a year and a half, then for two years a railroad clerk at Burlington, Iowa, and returning to Pekin, Illinois, engaged in the grocery business for two years. Mr. Amsbary began his career as a waterworks superintendent at Pekin, Illinois,...

Biography of Samuel R. Dillinger

Samuel R. Dillinger. One of the well known families of Clay County is that of Dillinger, which for many years had been active in the grain elevator business, and it had a worthy representative in Samuel R. Dillinger, who is manager of the Farmers Elevator Company at Bennington, Kansas. Mr. Dillinger was born in Des Moines County, Iowa, July 15, 1855, and is the elder of two sons born to his parents, who were Daniel and Nancy (Davis) Dillinger. His younger brother, Daniel Dillinger, came to Kansas in 1886 and is a prosperous farmer in Sherman County. In tracing his ancestry back several generations Samuel R. Dillinger finds that his paternal grandfather, Daniel Dillinger, was born in 1789, in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where his grandfather had established himself when he came from Germany. Daniel Dillinger followed agricultural pursuits in Westmoreland County and died there in 1845. On the maternal side the grandfather, John Davis, born in 1803, in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, was a descendant of a Hessian soldier who settled in Pennsylvania during the War of the Revolution. John Davis came to the West in the early 50’s and settled in Des Moines County, Iowa, where he became a farmer, having previously been a miller. He was married in Pennsylvania to Louisa Groover, and both died in Des Moines County. Daniel Dillinger, father of Samuel R. Dillinger, was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and died in Des Moines County, Iowa, in 1857. He grew to manhood in his native place, where he followed farming and worked at the carpenter trade, and then came to Des Moines County,...

Biography of Samuel R. Dillinger, Jr.

Samuel R. Dillinger, Jr. At all times the grain trade is one of vital importance in every country, and at the present time, when the eyes of a large portion of the earth are turned expectantly to the mighty grain yields of the United States, does the conservation of this food and its proper handling as a commercial factor take on added importance. To buy grain carefully, knowingly and economically requires something more than the trading instinet, it necessitates the possession of special talents and certain knowledge that can only come through actual experience. Samuel R. Dillinger, who is manager of the Co-operative Grain Association at Green, Kansas, was brought up in the business and is one of the best judges of grain in Kansas. Samuel R. Dillinger was born in Hamilton County, Nebraska, September 23, 1880. His parents are Samuel R. and Melissa Belle (Galientine) Dillinger, residents of Bennington, Kansas. They were born in Iowa and for some years resided in Clay and Hamilton counties, Nebraska. The father had always been more or less identified with farm and grain interests and at present is manager of an elevator at Bennington. Politically he is a Democrat and for nine years had been a member of the school board at Bennington. He belongs to and liberally supports the Methodist Episcopal Church and is a eitizen who is held in universal esteem. His children, six in number, are as follows: Samuel R.; Helen, who is the wife of Milton Fritz, resided on a farm near Plainville; Nellie, who is the wife of William Wing, who owned a lumber yard at Luray,...
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