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General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel. The United States, also, agreed to pay the Indians 850,000 per annum, for fifteen years, in consideration of this right. The boundaries assigned, by these treaties to the Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, included the greater part of the present Colorado Territory, while the Sioux and Crows were to occupy the land of the Powder River route. After a few years gold was discovered in Colorado, upon the Indian reservation, settlers poured in, and, after the lands were mostly taken up by them, another treaty was made, February 18th, 1861, to secure them in peaceful possession. By this compact the Indians relinquished a large tract of land, and agreed to confine themselves to a small district upon both sides of the Arkansas River and along the northern boundary of New Mexico; while the United States was to furnish them protection; pay an annuity of $30,000 to each tribe for fifteen years, and provide stock and agricultural implements for those who desired to adopt civilized modes of life. Until April, 1864, no disturbances had...

Biographical Sketch of John W. Clark

John W. Clark was born in Chillicothe, Missouri, September 4, 1853. He is the son of Dr. John K. Clark, a native of Kentucky, who is practicing his profession at present in Farmersville, Missouri. Mr. Clark was educated at Spring Hill, Livingston county, Missouri. He commenced life for himself on, the North Missouri Railway, and continued that business for two years, then served an apprenticeship, learning the watch-making trade at St. Joseph, Missouri, under August Wetteroth, who is regarded as one of the best workmen in the country. After finishing his apprenticeship he went to Denver and thence to Deadwood, working for a short time in each of these places at his trade. Mr. Clark located in Jamesport in 1876 with nothing but his tools and a good stock of pluck and determination, and by strict attention to business, good management and honorable dealing, has secured the support and patronage of the community, and built up a lucrative trade. He has a large and varied stock of all articles kept by a first-class jeweler, and is in a very prosperous condition. His success is the result of his own work. Mr. Clark was married in Spring Hill, November 22, 1877, to Miss Lizzie Wilburn, daughter of Charles H. and Tabitha Wilburn, of that place. Mrs. Clark was born in Spring Hill, Livingston county, Missouri, on the 27th day of March; 1858. Their union was the result of a long and intimate acquaintance, having lived in the same block for a great number of years. Their mothers were school children together, and the most amicable and friendly relations have always...

Biography of David Halliday Moffat

David H. Moffat, one of the empire builders of the great West, was born at Washingtonville, Orange County, N. Y., in the year 1839. He died in New York City on March 1S, 1911. He was the youngest child of David Moffat and Catherine Gregg Moffat. The life of David H. Moffat can be properly termed one of the romances of the great Middle West, for he was connected with almost every important development between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, particularly in the vicinity of Denver. He commenced his business career as a clerk in a New York bank at twenty years of age, and in 1860, shortly after the discovery of gold at Pike’s Peak, went to Denver, then a mining camp, where he established himself in the stationery business. That enterprise was first located in a tent, on the banks of Cherry Creek, where his little stock of newspapers, magazines and stationery was sold to the miners from a counter constructed by placing boards on the tops of two empty flour barrels. In a short time he was a clerk in the newly organized First National Bank of Denver, where he rose in rapid succession to the position of Cashier, and then President, a position which he held until his death. His name is inseparably connected with the mining industry of Colorado and the building of its railroad systems, in both of which he amassed a fortune of several millions of dollars. He was one of the chief promoters of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad system, and its President for many years. He built...

Biography of Chalkley M. Beeson

The recent death of Buffalo Bill brings to mind how few of the old western plainamen are left. One of the best known to Kansans of that picturesque class of Americans is alive and vigorous at Dodge City, and Chalkley M. Beeson, although he has rubbed shoulders with Generals Custer and Sheridan, Buffalo Bill and the Grand Duke Alexis (sou of a Russian czar), and was, during the earlier period of his manhood, an active flgure in the unrecorded movies of the wild and woolly West, has been settled these many years as a solid, prosperous farmer and state legislator of Ford County. He is a native of Salem, Ohio, born April 24, 1848; went to Denver in April, 1868; came to Kansas from Colorado in 1875, and has made stock raising the serious business of his life ever since. He has represented Ford County in four legislatures–those of 1903, 1905 and 1907, and the special session of 1908. The following sketch is pertinent: “The life of Mr. Beeson bridges the gap between the old and the new of the great plains. Leaving his home in Ohio as a boy of nineteen years, he has lived to see the Wild West supplanted by the Civilised West; as he says, ‘the white-face and short-horn steers replace the buffalo, and wheat, and corn, and alfalfa, supplant the buffalo grass.’ For many years he lived an adventurous life, but finally settled down at Dodge City in the cattle business. As the old ranges were broken up, he acquired land of his own, and he is now one of the wealthy men of...

Biography of John Baptist Miege

John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and from the Missouri River west to the Rocky Mountains, being consecrated to that office March 25, 1851, at St. Louis, under the title of Bishop of Messenie. On the 11th of the following May he arrived at St. Mary’s, Territory of Kansas, where he built the first Catholic Church in the great stretch...

Biography of Edwin H. Wagner

Edwin H. Wagner, of the firm of Edwin H. Wagner & Company, certified public accountants of St. Louis, was born in Laramie City, Wyoming, October 6, 1873, a son of Henry and Susan (Cantwell) Wagner. The father’s birth occurred in Ohio and during the Civil war he served with the Halleck Guards and participated in the siege of Jackson and other important engagements that led up to the final victory that crowned the Union arms. The mother was a grandniece of General Joseph Warren, who commanded -the troops at Bunker Hill, where he gave his life for the cause of independence. Her father was Thomas Cantwell, who fought in the Mexican war and was killed at Resaca de la Palma. In his boyhood days Edwin H. Wagner attended the public schools of his native city and then entered the State University at Laramie, while later he attended the Jesuit College at Denver, Colorado. He was thus well qualified by a liberal education for life’s practical duties and responsibilities. He next became connected with the auditing department of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company but later took up the study of law, spending the years 1897 and 1898 as a law student in the Washington University of St. Louis. Later he was connected with the Columbia Lead Company, with which he continued until the business was sold to the American Metal Company in 1901. He then became secretary and treasurer of the Madison Lead & Land Company, in which he owned an interest; and he ably directed the business of that organization, contributing largely to its success. He continued...

Biographical Sketch of R. L. Alsaker

R. L. Alsaker graduated from Loyola University, Medical Department, with the M. D. degree. He located in Denver, Colorado, and practiced his profession there several years. In 1913 he removed to St. Louis, Missouri. He has written extensively on health educational topics, especially for “Physical Culture Magazine.” He is the author of “Maintaining Health” and “Eating for Health and Efficiency.” as well as several smaller books. He is an authority on foods and...

Biography of Frank M. Stahl

If all the events, circumstances and movements with which Frank M. Stahl had been identified since he came to Kansas should be written out in detail the result would be a Kansas history perhaps as complete and certainly as interesting and instructive as could be written with one life as the central feature. To do full justice to such a career is manifestly impossible within brief limits, and the following must be in the nature of a suggestive outline of the career of one of the noted pioneer Kansans still alive, and an honored resident of Topeka. Born in Darke County, Ohio, May 23, 1841, he was one of the eight children, four now living, of Michael and Susan (Moore) Stahl. His paternal grandfather was a native of Germany. Michael Stahl was both a cooper and shoemaker, and as a youth Frank learned those trades from his father. In the decades of the ’40s and ’50s when he was growing up in Western Ohio there was no real public school system in that state. Most schools were maintained on the subscription plan, each family paying the tuition of those of its children who attended, and the time was usually only three months a year. Frank Stahl attended such a school in a log cabin. The first great national discussion which influenced his career was the Kansas-Nebraska controversy which began about 1853 under the leadership of Stephen A. Douglas culminated in the so-called squatter sovereignty policy, by which Congress determined that the Kansas-Nebrasks territory should enter the Union either as a free or slave state, depending upon the will of...

Biographical Sketch of Roswell W. Clement

Among the leading agriculturists of Malheur county is to be mentioned the subject of this sketch, whose life has manifested a worthy record of honest and rigorous endeavor, dominated with sagacity and tempered with prudence and display of affability and genial bearing toward all. In Middleville, Barry county, Michigan, on January 5, 1862, occurred the happy event of the birth of Roswell W. Clement, his parents being Judge James T. and Lucy (Hayes) Clement. The family came to Usage, Iowa, while our subject was a small child, and thence they removed to the vicinity of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1868. In these various places Roswell W. was reared, receiving a good education from the common schools. 1881 marks the date when they again removed toward the west, this time journeying with teams, one of which our subject drove the entire distance, to Payette, Idaho, making the trip in eighty days. Here on September 11. 1884, Mr. Clement married Miss Harriet, daughter of John and Melissa Neal, and a native of Denver, Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Neal were early pioneers of the Payette Valley, coming thither from Denver, in which town they also were among the first settlers and lived there when flour retailed at fifty dollars per sack. To Mr. and Mrs. Clement there have been born four children named as follows: Martha Ethel, James R., Walter and Buell J. Mr. Clement came to his present place, which consists of one hundred acres of valuable land six miles southwest from Ontario. in 1895. He purchased the land when it was raw and at once began the work of improvement with...

Biography of Benjamin E. Bradley

Benjamin E. Bradley, general manager of the Star of St. Louis and widely known in newspaper circles throughout the country, was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, October 13, 1869, and is a son of Benjamin A. and Martha R. (Briggs) Bradley. The father died August 30, 1919, at the venerable age of eighty-seven years, being then the oldest living native-born resident of Johnson county, Missouri. The family has been represented on American soil through many generations and the forebears of Benjamin E. Bradley have fought in all the different wars from the Revolution, while his son Philip was a soldier in France in the World war. Benjamin E. Bradley completed his education in the University of Missouri. His life has been given to the newspaper business and steadily he has advanced to prominence in journalistic circles. He was manager at one time of the Western Democrat at Missoula, Montana, afterward city editor of the Times, the Post and the Republican at Denver, Colorado, later became legislative correspondent of the Chronicle of San Francisco and upon his return to the middle west accepted the position of managing editor of the Inter-Ocean of Chicago. Returning to his native state, he was assistant general manager of the Post-Dispatch until he became identified with the Star, of which he is now vice president and general manager. Mr. Bradley has been married twice. In Missoula, Montana, on the 11th of May, 1893, he wedded Louise M. Worden, daughter of Frank I.. Worden, who was the founder of that city. On the 2d of June, 1913, in Buffalo, New York, he married Dorothea S. Lockwood,...
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