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Biography of Amasa J. Parker, Jr.

AMASA J. PARKER, JR. FOREMOST among Albanians who in various ways have devoted their time and best energies to the advancement of the public interests of the city and state, stands the name of Amasa J. Parker, Jr. Born on the 6th day of May, 1843, in the beautiful village of Delhi, Delaware county, N. Y., he is the only surviving son of the venerable Judge Amasa J. Parker and the late Harriet Langdon Parker. His parents removed to Albany when he was but a year old, and here he grew up in the midst of our institutions, in a city for whose welfare and prosperity no one has stronger feelings of attachment, or higher ambition that she may excel. His earliest education was carefully watched over by loving and cultured parents, whom any son might well be proud to honor and revere. When very young he was first sent to a small private school under the charge of Miss Margaret Cassidy. Afterward he became a pupil in the school of the Messrs. Wrightson, where he remained about six years studying the elementary branches. He was fitted for college at the Albany academy. In the fall of 1860 he joined the class of ’63 at Union college at the beginning of the sophomore year, where he was noted for diligence in his studies and for his devotion to athletic exercises. It was while in college that his taste for military matters was first strongly displayed. In 1861, when the civil war threw its dark shadow over the country, young Parker, then nearly 18 years old, was one of the...

Biography of Amasa J. Parker

AMASA J. PARKER AN ALBANIAN of high intellectual qualities, who has passed his four-score years, and who has been a resident of this city for forty-four years, adorning its history by distinguished public service and private virtues is the Hon. Amasa J. Parker. He is a true representative of those enterprising New England pioneers who came from their old homes to aid in the development of the then new state of New York and the great western territories. Away back amidst the howling wilderness, where the cheering rays of the sun scarcely ever beamed upon their humble log cabins, they lived and toiled for the good of their country, their families, and their cherished civil and religious institutions. Judge Parker’s ancestors were among those who defended their homes from the invasion of the red men during the old French and English wars, when many a deed of horrid cruelty was enacted by the savages – when the tomahawk and scalping-knife in the hands of murderous foes gleamed through the thick forests, and when fears prevailed on every side, through the light of day and the darkness of night. And when the declaration of American independence was proclaimed, those worthy ancestors were found fighting on the side of the colonists in defense of the just rights of free men; and they laid not down their arms until this new republic was established, and the goddess of liberty forever enshrined in the hearts of the American people. Thomas Fenn, the maternal grandfather of Judge Parker, was a resident of Watertown, Conn., and for more than thirty sessions he represented his town...

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