Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Robert Lee Mitchell, M. D.

Dr. Robert Lee Mitchell, a member of one of the old and prominent families of Oklahoma, founded here in early territorial days, engaged in the general practice of medicine at Vinita from 1909 to the close of the year 1921, and during the period which has since elapsed has firmly established himself in the public regard as a man of high professional attainments. He was born at Oaks, which was at that time situated in the Delaware district of the Cherokee Nation, in Indian Territory, and is of Cherokee extraction in the maternal line, his parents being George Washington and Susan (Hildebrand) Mitchell. The father was born in Benton County, Arkansas, and his early life was devoted to the occupation of farming. Subsequently he turned his attention to merchandising and for fourteen years was connected with business interests of Oaks, Oklahoma. In 1894 he established his home in Craig County and is a landowner, being recognized as one of the representative men of his community. His political support is given to the Democratic Party, and he has served as a member of the Cherokee Board of Education at Tahlequah, being the only white man intermarried with the tribe to hold that position. He has taken the thirty-second degree in Masonry and is an exemplary representative of the craft. Robert Lee Mitchell is one of a family of four children. During his boyhood he resided on the home farm and also in the village of Oaks, where he attended the public schools. In 1895 he was graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree from the Tahlequah Male Seminary, after which...

Biography of A. M. Whorton

A. M. Whortan, Superintendent of schools at Delaware, Nowata County, was born in McDonald County, Missouri, on the 8th of January, 1879, a son of C. O. and Isabelle (Hopper) Whortan, the former a native of Alabama and the latter of Missouri. When a youth the father removed from his native state to Arkansas and for many years he engaged in farming, achieving more than substantial success in that connection. He is now living in Fayetteville in retirement. Mrs. Whortan died in 1896. In the acquirement of an education A. M. Whortan attended the public schools of Missouri and in due time entered the Central State Normal School of Oklahoma. In 1916 he was graduated from that institution and became a student in the State University, receiving his A. B. degree that year. He has taught school since 1896 and at one time taught thirteen consecutive months. He has the record of never missing a day from his school work. In 1897 Mr. Whortan came to Oklahoma and taught in the schools of Jackson County until 1914. The following three years he was identified with educational work in Tillman County, and since 1917 he has been Superintendent of the Delaware schools. Mr. Whortan has been assisted in his professional career by his wife, who is primary supervisor of the Delaware schools and a woman of much culture and refinement. Since assuming the duties and responsibilities of Superintendent of schools, Mr. Whortan has made a noticeable improvement in the educational system here. In this position he succeeded A. L. Shattuck, under whose supervision the school had an enrollment of three...

Biography of William Pressley Thompson

William Pressley Thompson, a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Oklahoma, was for many years prominent in the affairs of the Cherokee Nation, and for over two decades he has been a member of the Vinita bar, being recognized as one of the most able attorneys in northeastern Oklahoma. He was born on a cotton plantation in Smith county, Texas, November 19, 1866, his parents being James Franklin and Caroline E. (McCord) Thompson, the former a native of Georgia and the latter of Mississippi, and both now deceased. The father accompanied the Cherokees on their removal to Indian Territory in 1837 and for a time he followed the profession of teaching. When still a young man he went to Texas, where he engaged in merchandising, milling and lumbering, and in that state his marriage occurred. Following the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted and served under Colonel Patrick Cleburn, Granberry’s brigade, with General Hood’s army, and was wounded in the engagement at Franklin, Tennessee, in 1864, being sent for treatment to a hospital at Nashville, that state. After recovering from his injuries he participated in the siege of Richmond, Virginia, and upon receiving his discharge from the service returned to Texas. In 1869 he took up his residence in the Delaware district of the Cherokee Nation, in Indian Territory, where he followed the occupation of farming until his demise in 1874. He became an influential and prominent figure in public affairs and was a member of the citizenship commission of the Cherokee Nation. William P. Thompson spent the period of his boyhood upon the home...

Biography of Henry Edward Dixon

Henry Edward Dixon, a member of one of the old and well known families of Oklahoma, is a leading representative of the Delaware County bar, being engaged in practice at Grove, and he has gained an enviable reputation in a profession which calls for ability of a high order and requires close application, good judgment and a constantly widening comprehension of the relations and responsibilities which go to make up civilized society. He was born in Watseka, Iroquois County, Illinois, on the 13th of January, 1872, a son of Marion and Georgiana (Seward) Dixon, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Ohio. The father devoted his life to the cattle business, coming to this section of the country in 1892 and purchasing stock in various parts of the territory. He first made his home in Miami but later took up his residence at Fairland, Oklahoma, where he passed away in 1915, when seventy-three years of age, but the mother is still living in Miami. He was a member of the United Brethren Church, a Democrat in his political views, and fraternally was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Henry E. Dixon acquired his education in the public schools of Illinois, which he attended until he was sixteen years of age, afterward accompanying his parents on their removal to Indian Territory, where he remained until a young man of nineteen, when he went back to his native state and in two years finished his collegiate work in Iroquois County. He then returned to Indian Territory and for two years was an instructor in Fairland Academy,...

Biography of Thomas M. Buffington

Thomas M. Buffington, an honored pioneer of Oklahoma and one of the most prominent men in the state, was for many years a dominant figure in the councils of the Cherokee Nation but is now living retired at Vinita at the age of sixty-six years. He was born in the Going Snake district of the Cherokee Nation, near accompanied the Cherokees on their removal to the Choctaw 1855, and his parents were Ezekiel and Louisa (Newman) Buffington, the former of whom was born in the Cherokee Nation of Georgia, while the latter was a native of Tennessee. The father accompanied the Cherokees on their removal to the Choctaw Nation in 1835, devoting his attention to the occupation of farming. He died at the Good Water Mission in 1863, and the mother passed away in Indian Territory in 1896. Reared upon the home farm, Thomas M. Buffington attended the Baptist missions and Cherokee schools but had very limited educational opportunities. During the progress of the Civil war the family had removed to Texas but subsequently they returned to Indian Territory and Mr. Buffington remained at home until a young man of twenty-two years, when he began cultivating land which he owned on Mustang creek, now in Delaware County, Oklahoma. This he continued to operate for eleven years, being numbered among the most progressive and successful agriculturists of the district, and he was chosen President of the Farmers Alliance. In 1892 he came to Vinita and for six years engaged in general merchandising as a member of the firm of Charlesworth & Buffington. Much of his life has been devoted to...

Biography of Lucien Webster Buffington

With the history of progress in Vinita the name of Lucien Webster Buffington is closely associated and in his demise, which occurred in this city on the 3d of December, 1919, Oklahoma lost one of its honored pioneers and his community one of its oldest and best beloved citizens. He was one of the early settlers of this part of the state and his industry and enterprise were factors in general development and improvement as well as in the attainment of individual success. His birth occurred at Beattie’s Prairie, then in the Cherokee Nation, in Indian Territory, but now a part of Delaware County, Oklahoma, on the 15th of August, 1867, and he was there reared and educated. In 1897 he became one of the organizers of the Vinita National Bank, of which he was made Vice President, acting in that capacity for some time, and for six years prior to his demise had filled the office of President. He was a man of marked business integrity and ability and his initiative spirit and powers of administration enabled him to build up one of the leading financial institutions in this part of the state. Broadening the scope of his activities, he acquired large holdings in land, was one of the directors of the First National Bank of Chelsea, Oklahoma, and became financially interested in oil companies and other important corporations throughout the state. He was quick to see and utilize an opportunity for advancement and his efforts were resultant factors in whatever he undertook. On the 4th of April, 1886, in Vinita, Mr. Buffington was united in marriage to...

Biography of Mack S. Edmondson

Except for looking after his land and other interests of a varied and important nature, Mack S. Edmondson is living retired in Pryor, enjoying the fruits of a life spent in diligence and industry. He was born on the 9th of September, 1853, a son of Van and Laura (Denman) Edmondson, both natives of Georgia. They came to this state after the Civil war but subsequently removed to Texas and located at Kaufman. The mother’s demise occurred there and soon afterward the father removed to Delaware county, Indian Territory, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until his death. Mack S. Edmondson received his education in the public schools of Delaware county and later became a student in the Pea Ridge College at Pea Ridge, Arkansas. Upon putting his text-books aside he engaged in the stock business in Delaware county and was actively identified with that enterprise until coming to Pryor. As the result of intelligently directed effort, stanch determination, courage and innate ability, Mr. Edmondson achieved a substantial success and after locating here he retired from active business life. He does, however, look after his extensive land interests in the county and a few other interests of an important nature.% 9 In Delaware county, Indian Territory, in February, 1878, occurred the marriage of Mr. Edmondson and Miss Florence Williams, daughter of Oce Williams, of a prominent Cherokee family. To their union five children were born, three of whom are now living: Cherokee Dora, the wife of Robert Bruce Garrett, further mention of whom is made on another page of this work; Mrs. Gonia Tinnin, of Boston, Massachusetts;...

Biography of John Caleb Storr

John Caleb Storr, a native son of Oklahoma and a member of one of the oldest families of the state, has resided in Vinita for the past twenty-three years and has become well known as an attorney, farmer, stock raiser and oil operator, being a man of versatile talents whose efforts are resultant factors in whatever he undertakes. He was born in the Flint district of the Cherokee Nation, near Stilwell, Indian Territory, October 15, 1870, and his parents were James and Emma Jane (Rider) Storr, the former born in Tennessee in 1832, while the latter was a native of the Cherokee Nation. In 1837 the father accompanied his parents on their removal to Indian Territory, settlement being made in the Cherokee Nation, and from 1878 until his demise James Storr followed the occupation of farming in Delaware County. He was very successful in his agricultural operations, accumulating large holdings in land, and he also devoted a large part of his attention to the breeding of fine driving horses. He was one of the leading men of his community and passed. away at Grove, Delaware County, in 1901, in the faith of the Catholic Church. The mother survives and is still a resident of Grove. After completing the work of the grammar and high schools John C. Storr entered the Tahlequah Male Seminary, from which he was graduated in 1890 with the B. S. degree. At intervals for three years he attended a business college at Fort Worth, Texas, and in 1894 came to Indian Territory. For a time he assisted the Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation in the...

Penner, Audrey Dorene Viles – Obituary

Audrey Dorene Penner, a resident of Lewis County for 70 years, died Thursday [August 24] in a Bellevue Hospital. She was 79. She was born Oct. 25, 1898, in Grove, Okla., and was raised in the Adna area. Survivors include her husband, Gerhardt at home in Bellevue; a son Clark C, Walnut Creek, Calif.; a daughter, Mrs. H. C. (Carmen) Hardebeck, Bellevue; a brother, George W. Viles, Centralia; six grandchildren; and seven great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Monday at 1:30 p.m. at Sticklin Funeral Chapel with the Rev. Dennis Weaver officiating. Interment will follow at Claquato Cemetery, Chehalis. Arrangements are under the direction of Sticklin Funeral Chapel. Daily Chronicle, August 26, 1978 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Elbert Jacob Snider

(See Grant and Duncan)-Elbert Jacob, son of Andrew Johnson (born May 1, 1867 in Davis County, Mo.) and Cynthia (Muskrat) Snider, born May 4, 1867; in Delaware District and married November 28, 1886 and died July 2, 1902, was born September 29, 1888 at Grove, Delaware District. He was educated at Grove and Male Seminary. He married September 26, 1912, Martha Elizabeth, daughter of John Martin Daniel (born October 2, 1843 married August 31, 1876 and died October 10, 1913) and Alice R. (Smith) Daniels (born June 10, 1854 at Fayetteville, Arkansas and died November 10, 1905 ), born April 13, 1888 and married September 26, 1912 at Vinita. Elbert J. and Martha E. Snider are the parents of Genevieve M. born October 27, 1913 and Elbert Jacob Snider, born November 22, 1915. John Martin Daniel was elected Sheriff of Delaware District August 4, 1873 and member of council from same district August 6, 1883 and his son, James Henry, the eldest brother of Mrs. Martha E. Snider was elected a member of the Council in 1902. Elbert Jacob Snider is the grandson of Jacob and Martha (Fields) Muskrat; great grandson of Ezekial and Polly Ann (Sexton) Fields and the great great grandson of Richard Fields, Chief of the Texas Cherokee from 1822 until his death in 1827. Elbert J. Snider, has three brothers, James Floyd, born January 1, 1890; Roy Clinton, born May 3, 1892 and Cecil Freeman Snider born May 3, 1897. Mrs. Martha E. Snider’s brothers and sisters are Marmaduke, born October 9, 1877; James Henry, born April 9, 1879 and died May 5, Robert John...
Page 4 of 512345

Pin It on Pinterest