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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Native American History of DeKalb County, Georgia

DeKalb County located in northern Georgia. It is named after Hans Kalb, a German adventurer, who falsified his name to be Baron Johann de Kalb, when volunteering to serve in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He died in the Battle of Camden, SC in 1781. All of DeKalb County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Decatur. Approximately, 10% of the City of Atlanta is located in DeKalb County. DeKalb in the location of Stone Mountain and the Centers for Disease Control. The CDC and adjacent Emory University compose one of the most important biological research complexes in the world. DeKalb is bordered on the west and northwest by Fulton County. Gwinett County forms its northeastern boundary. Rockdale County forms the southeastern boundary. Clayton County forms its southern boundary. Geology and hydrology DeKalb County was located in the Upper Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Upper Piedmont terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys, but in some areas can seem semi-mountainous. This is because high mountains once stood at these locations, but have eroded to large hills through the eons. Stone Mountain is the heavily eroded core of an ancient volcano. It is composed of granite and related igneous rocks. The South River forms in East Point, GA (Fulton County) then flow across DeKalb County. It is one of the tributaries of the Ocmulgee River, which joins the Oconee River in southeastern Georgia to form the Altamaha River. The Altamaha flows into the Atlantic Ocean near Darien,...

Biography of Erasmus D. Shattuck

Judge E. D. Shattuck was born in Bakersfield, Franklin County, Vermont, December 31, 1824. He spent his boyhood and youth on a farm and was prepared for a collegiate course at Bakersfield Academy. In 1844 he entered Vermont University, pursued the full classical course and graduated in 1848. While in college he was dependent upon his own resources for means to prosecute his studies, and during vacations and some part of term time he taught school in the country or had private classes in the village. Notwithstanding these disadvantages and interruptions he completed the college course in the prescribed time and stood third in his class on final examinations. On leaving college Mr. Shattuck was employed for a year as teacher of Latin and mathematics in Bakersfield Academy. He then went to Georgia and taught a year in Newnan Seminary, situated about twenty-five miles from the city of Atlanta. While in Newnan he employed his leisure in reading law in the office of Archibald McKinley, at that time one of the leading lawyers in that part of the State. In 1851 he returned north and located in Malone, New York, where he applied himself to the study of law in the office of Parmelee & Fitch. In the Spring of 1852 he went to New York City and entered the office of Abner Benedict, where he remained reading law and acquiring the details of practice until October, 1852, when he was admitted to the bar. Soon after his admission to the bar he decided to come to Oregon, at that time almost an unknown region. He did not purpose...

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