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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Biography of James Madison Jones

James Madison Jones, the popular and efficient station agent of the Concord & Montreal Railroad at Concord, was born at Deerfield, N.H., April 26, 1833, son of James and Hannah L. (Marston) Jones. Jacob Jones, his grandfather, a native of Pittsfield, N.H., kept a successful clock and gunsmith shop in his native town for many years. He had a high local reputation as a mechanic, and he lived to a good old age. James Jones, who was born in Pittsfield, N.H., inherited his father’s mechanical talent. He took up and continued the paternal business of making and repairing clocks and executing gunsmith work, adding thereto that of a blacksmith. In the latter half of his life he removed to Concord, where he entered the employ of Abiel Chandler, the clock-maker, and soon established for himself a great local reputation in that city for skill in his line of business. He could repair any sort of machine or mechanical instrument. His useful life closed in Concord, at the age of seventy-eight years. He married Hannah L. Marston, of Pittsfield. Their family consisted of the following children: James Madison, the subject of this sketch; Thomas A., who went to Chicago, Ill., and was appointed paymaster on the Chicago & North-western Railroad; Charles E., who is an engineer on the Boston & Maine Railroad; George A., who enlisted for service in the Civil War, first at Portsmouth in the First New Hampshire Regiment of Volunteers, and subsequently for three years in Company E of the Second New Hampshire Regiment, and who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg in 1863; Frank and...

Biography of James Yeaton

James Yeaton, a well-known farmer of Epsom, Merrimack County, was born in this town, January 11, 1832, son of John and Sarah (Bickford) Yeaton. His ancestors for several generations were prosperous farmers in this State; and his great-grandfather, John Yeaton (first), was a pioneer settler in Epsom. John Yeaton, second, grandfather of James, was a native of this town, and resided here his entire life. A successful farmer, he accumulated considerable property. He was a Democrat in politics and a Congregationalist in his religious views. At his death he was about eighty-one years old. He was three times married. His first wife, whose maiden name was Bickford, died at the age of twenty-five. Of her two sons who attained maturity, John was the elder. The father married for his second wife a Miss Towle, who had three children, none of whom are living. His third marriage, which was made with the widow of William Yeaton, resulted in no children. John Yeaton, third, was born in Epsom, March 29, 1804. He was reared to farming, which he followed successfully during his active period; and he died at the age of seventy-six years, leaving a good estate. He was one of the prominent men of his day. While not an office-seeker for himself, he took an active part in securing the election of capable officials. In politics he acted with the Free Soil party, but later became a Republican. He was a member of the Free Will Baptist church. His first wife, Sarah Bickford Yeaton, whom he married December 25, 1828, was a daughter of Samuel Bickford, of Epsom. She died...

Biography of Samuel N. Simpson

Samuel N. Simpson. A notable life came to a close with the death of Samuel N. Simpson on November 27, 1915: Important though his achievements were in the field of business and in the development of many useful enterprises and undertakings in the cities of Lawrence and Kansas City, Kansas, it is because his activities and influence were so vitally identified with the primitive period of the territorial Kansas that his individual history bulks so large in the annals of the state and furnishes a chapter that may be read with instruction and profit by every student of Kansas annals. The story of his early experiences was well told in his own words. He wrote them at the request of his children, and it was due to a modesty which was one of his characteristics that he never used the pronoun I in the entire recital. It is a narrative simply told and with a personal detachment and candor that makes it one of the most illuminating chapters in Kansas history. There is every propriety in permitting the readers of this publication to see through the eyes of Mr. Simpson the conditions as he saw them in the early territorial period. He begins his narrative with a brief description of the conditions which prevailed as a result of the struggle between the free state and pro-slavery elements for the possession of Kansas. He tells how by the wholesale importation of voters from Missouri a slavery territorial legislature was elected in 1855, a code of slave laws enacted to govern the territory, and how the machinery of the Federal Government...

Biography of Andrew J. Silver

Andrew J. Silver, senior partner in the firm of Silver & Hall, Gossville, and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Deerfield, N.H., May 9, 1835, son of Joseph M. and Sarah S. (Chase) Silver. The latter, natives respectively of Haverhill, Mass., and Deerfield, were both born in the year 1800. Joseph M. Silver moved to Deerfield when quite young and learned the carpenter’s trade. The active portion of his life was devoted to that calling. He owned a good farm, which he also cultivated with success, and lived to the age of eighty-eight years. In politics he acted with the Republican party. His wife, Sarah, who was a daughter of Nathan Chase, of Deerfield, became the mother of seven children, of whom there are living: Abbie C., John W., Andrew J., Horace C., and Charles W. Abbie C. is the wife of C. W. Prescott, of Raymond, N.H. John W. married Hattie Chase, of Chester, N.H.; and his children are: Walter H. and Charles P. Horace C. first married Mary E. Brown, and subsequently Mrs. Josephine White, a native of Tilton, and the widow of Charles H. White. Neither wife is now living. Charles W. married Abbie Arlin, of Manchester, N.H. Mrs. Joseph M. Silver died at the age of eighty-two. She and her husband were members of the Congregational church. Andrew J. Silver completed his education at the Pittsfield Academy. After assisting his father for a short time, he became a clerk in a general store at Suncook village, in the town of Pembroke; and later he worked in the same capacity at Hookset....

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