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Biographical Sketch of John W. Clark

John W. Clark was born in Chillicothe, Missouri, September 4, 1853. He is the son of Dr. John K. Clark, a native of Kentucky, who is practicing his profession at present in Farmersville, Missouri. Mr. Clark was educated at Spring Hill, Livingston county, Missouri. He commenced life for himself on, the North Missouri Railway, and continued that business for two years, then served an apprenticeship, learning the watch-making trade at St. Joseph, Missouri, under August Wetteroth, who is regarded as one of the best workmen in the country. After finishing his apprenticeship he went to Denver and thence to Deadwood, working for a short time in each of these places at his trade. Mr. Clark located in Jamesport in 1876 with nothing but his tools and a good stock of pluck and determination, and by strict attention to business, good management and honorable dealing, has secured the support and patronage of the community, and built up a lucrative trade. He has a large and varied stock of all articles kept by a first-class jeweler, and is in a very prosperous condition. His success is the result of his own work. Mr. Clark was married in Spring Hill, November 22, 1877, to Miss Lizzie Wilburn, daughter of Charles H. and Tabitha Wilburn, of that place. Mrs. Clark was born in Spring Hill, Livingston county, Missouri, on the 27th day of March; 1858. Their union was the result of a long and intimate acquaintance, having lived in the same block for a great number of years. Their mothers were school children together, and the most amicable and friendly relations have always...

Biography of Jonas W. Brown

Jonas W. Brown, of Boise, is an honored pioneer both of California and of Idaho. He crossed the plains with ox teams to Shasta county, California, in 1853, and since that time his life record has been inseparably interwoven with the history of this section of the country. At all times he has been the advocate of those measures tending to-ward the advancement and development of the region, and his influence is that of an honorable, upright man, whose force of character stamps itself indelibly for good upon the public life. This work would be incomplete without mention of Jonas W. Brown, and it is therefore with pleasure that we present his sketch to our readers. A native of Ohio, he was born in Roscoe, Coshocton County, on the 27th of June, 1825, and is descended from New England ancestry. His father, Samuel Brown, was a resident of North Danvers, Massachusetts. His mother, Mrs. Lydia (Warren) Brown, was a relative of General Warren, who won fame at the battle of Bunker Hill. They were members of the Methodist church and were people of much worth. The father was a farmer and also engaged in the manufacture of brick. He departed this life in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife was called to her final rest in her fifty-sixth year. They had a family of ten children, of whom two are now living. Upon the homestead farm, in Ohio, Jonas W. Brown spent his boyhood days and early became familiar with the various duties and labors which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He obtained...

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