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Biographical Sketch of S. Marshall Weaver

Weaver, S. Marshall; dentist; born, Dayton, O., Dec. 13, 1875; son of W. J. and Mary E. Marshall Weaver; educated, Ravenna High School and Western Reserve University (D. D. S.) ; married, Cleveland, April 17, 1896; two sons; pres. Weaver Dental Specialty Co.; vice pres. Cleveland Vending Co.; director Realty Building-Renting Co.; member National, Ohio State, Northern Ohio and Cleveland Dental Societies, Delta Sigma Delta, Colonial and Cleveland Athletic Clubs; pres. Cleveland Dental Society,...

Biographical Sketch of Martin Snide

Snide, Martin; pres. the Interstate Cooperage Co.; born, Dayton, O., Aug. 16, 1846; educated in the public schools; started in the cooperage business in Dayton, O., with his father; came to Cleveland, 1871, and continued the business until 1878; then with the Standard Oil Co., as mgr. of the Cooperage Dept.; elected pres. of the Interstate Cooperage Co., 1904; still serving; pres. the Snider-Hughes Co., Guarantee Title & Trust Co.; treas. Riverside Cemetery Ass’n; director the Cleveland Trust Co.; interested in a number of other corporations; member Union, Euclid and Roadside Clubs; and Ohio Society, New York;...

Biographical Sketch of Milton Russell Slocum

Slocum, Milton Russell; music dealer; born, Lyendonville, N. Y., Aug. 4, 1859; at the age of 4 years, came to Ohio with his parents; educated, public schools of Osborn; married, Aug. 6, 1889, Minnie M. Walsh, of Elyria, O.; issue, one daughter, Lucile, a talented musician; in 1876, when a mere boy, became salesman in a music store in Dayton, O.; spent many years as a traveling salesman for the music trade; opened music store in Cleveland in 1897, meeting with success; Christian Scientist; member Lakewood Church; member Elks Lodge, No. 18, Marysville Lodge, No. 87, I. O. O. F., Commercial Travelers, No. 1824, and Toledo Traveling Mens Ass in, No. 536; member Ohio Council of the North American Union of Forest City Council, No. 196, of the National Union; has thorough knowledge of piano...

Biography of Samuel Bowman

Samuel Bowman, now of Coffeyville, where he is engaged in the real estate, insurance and loan business with his sons, is a Kansas resident of nearly thirty-five years and was long prominent in Labette County, where he served two terms as probate judge. His Bowman ancestors were German people who came to Pennsylvania in Colonial times. His grandfather, Benjamin Bowman, a native of Pennsylvania, was a farmer and cabinet maker, also a minister of the Dunkard Church, and spent many years in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where he died some years before Judge Bowman was born. It was in the valley of the Shenandoah, a mile from Harrisonburg, Virginia, that Samuel Bowman was born May 18, 1846. His father, John Bowman, was born in the same locality in 1790, and spent his life in that famous valley, engaged in farming and stock raising. He died at Harrisonburg in 1873. Though a resident of Virginia he was not in sympathy with the South on the issue of slavery, was a stanch Union man, and a whig and republican in politics. He was an active member of the Dunkard Church. John Bowman married Rebecca Wine, who was born in the Shenandoah Valley in 1802, and died on the old farm near Harrisonburg in 1872. A brief record of the children is as follows: Daniel, who was a Virginia farmer and died in that state; Catherine, who died in the Shenandoah Valley as the wife of Joseph Miller, also deceased. Elizabeth, who died in Virginia in 1915, and her husband Daniel Thomas, who was a farmer, is also deceased; John W....

Yerkes, Inez M. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Inez M. Yerkes died of cancer on Feb. 21, 2000, at Providence Hospital in Portland. Mrs. Yerkes was born Feb. 14, 1924, in Slade, Ky. Her maiden name was Brown. Prior to living in Wallowa County, she resided in Dayton, Ohio. She moved to Enterprise in 1970. She was a licensed practical nurse and worked for Wallowa County Memorial Hospital, retiring in 1992. Prior to marrying Roland Yerkes on Feb. 21, 1975, she was married to Otha Morrison on Oct. 12, 1946. She was preceded in death by her husband Otha Morrison, who died in 1972, and her son Ronald Morrison who died in 1971. She is survived by her daughter Linda Neace and son-in-law Jim Neace and granddaughter Amy Magness, all of Portland; grandsons, Scott Blessing, Portland, and David Blessing of Colorado Springs, Colo,; four great-grandchildren, Christopher and Austin Magness and Keenan and Amanda Blessing; stepchildren Charles (Fonda) Yerkes, Graham, Wash., Mary Duncan, Port Orchard, Wash., and Kathy Bruno, Pleasanton, Calif.; Sister, Eunice Lambert of Dayton, Ohio; and nieces, Donna Lambert, Patricia Schulke, and Emma Haggerty, all of Dayton, Ohio. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 4, 2000, at Mountain View Christian Church in Joseph. Internment will be in Woodlawn Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio. The family suggests remembrance to the American Cancer Society in her name. Source: Wallowa County Chieftain, March 2, 2000, Page 2 Contributed by: Sue...

Watson, Rex Jay – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Rex Jay Watson, 55, of La Grande died Dec. 13 at a local care center. Family and friends are invited to a gathering at 3 p.m. Saturday at the American Legion in La Grande. Daniels Chapel of the Valley is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Watson was born Feb. 21, 1951, in Dayton, Ohio, to Finley James and Wilma (Edmiston) Watson. He attended schools in Dayton. Later he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he was proud to serve his country in the 82nd Airborne Special Forces Ranger division during the Vietnam era. After his honorable discharge, he returned to Dayton for a time before moving to Laramie, Wyo., before finally settling in La Grande. On Jan. 21, 1978, he married Sharon Ann Redden. Together the couple not only raised their own children but many other children over the years. Rex received a bachelor’s degree of fine arts from Washington State University in 1992 and became an accomplished artist in oil painting and was known as an expert in the art of flint-knapping. He volunteered his gift of art to children every year at the Cove Cherry Festival and at Arts For All. He also enjoyed fishing and had a great sense of humor, wisdom and creativity. Survivors include his wife, Sharon, of La Grande; his mother, Wilma Ohler of Kettering, Ohio; children, Kiley Watson of Eugene, KB Watson, Ben Waln and Dan Waln, all of La Grande; brother, Kenneth Ullery; sisters, Iris Hicks and Joyce Barger, all of Ohio; and numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives. He was preceded in death by his father, Finley...

Bowman, Carrie Lampe – Obituary

Carrie (Lampe) Bowman, 91, of 114 Cynthia St., died Sept. 3, 1984, at Froh Community Home, Sturgis, following a four-year illness. She was born Nov. 3, 1892 in Burr Oak Township, a daughter of Helmuth Henry and Ida (Waterstraut) Lampe. On Sept. 3, 1912, she married Frank Athol Bowman in Sturgis. He died in 1951. She was a Bronson resident since 1931. She was of the Evangelical Lutheran faith and attended the Bronson Baptist Church for many years. She was employed by the Sturgis Journal from age 16-20, when the owner was E. A. Ferrier. During World War II she was employed at Wright-Patterson, Dayton, Ohio and from 1935 until her retirement at age 65, at the Bronson Reel Co. Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Howard B. (Geraldine) Wolfe, Bronson; one son, Wallace R. Bowman Sr., Sturgis; three grandchildren; six great grandchildren; nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by three sisters and one brother. Relatives and friends may call after 3 p.m. today at the Kubasiak-Kolcz Funeral Home, Bronson. Services are 1 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home with the Rev. Clinton Housely officiating. Burial will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery. Sturgis Journal, September 4, 1984 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Ira C. Buzick

Ira C. Buzick was one of the pioneer lawyers of Lincoln County. He was the first man elected to represent that county in the State Legislature after the county was formally organized in 1870. He had a long and active career as a lawyer and in public affairs, and the name is still continued on the professional rolls of the Kansas bar through his son, Alonson Ruckman Buzick of Salina. Ira C. Buzick was born June 21, 1841, at Dayton, Ohio. His parents were also native Ohioans. At the age of twenty-two he took up the study of law, and when twenty-five years of age graduated from Allegheny College at Meadville, Pennsylvania. He soon afterwards went west and first located for practice at Oregon, Missouri. In 1868 he represented Holt County in the Missouri Legislature. He also founded the New Era, the first republican paper even published at Savannah, Missouri. Besides his newspaper work and his practice as a lawyer he served for a time as principal of an academy at Savannah. In 1870 Ira C. Buzick came out to Kansas and located in Lincoln County. Lincoln County was created about 1867, but it had no civil organization until 1870. Mr. Buzick took an active part in that process by which the county was organized, and in the election of November of that year he was chosen to represent the county in the State Legislature during the session of 1871. He was very active at Topeka in behalf of his constituents and also gave important service on various committees. As a lawyer he built up a splendid practice at...

Biography of J. R. Bayley, M.D.

J.R. BAYLEY, M.D. – Doctor Bayley, to whom has fallen an unusual portion of public labor and honor, was born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1820. His mother dying, he was cared for by his grandmother, through whose liberality he received an ample education. In 1839 he moved to Clay county, Missouri, but two years later returned to Ohio, and in 1847 began the study of medicine in South Charleston with Doctors Skinner and Steele. He also attended the medical school at Cleveland in 1849, and the next year studied at the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati. Upon graduating from this institution in 1851, he returned to South Charleston, practicing medicine, and a year later continued his profession at Louisburg. He was married in Xenia in 1852 to Miss Elizabeth Harpole, and remained in Louisburg until the autumn of 1854. In this year he prepared to cross the continent to Oregon, and reached our state in May, 1855, settling at Lafayette and practicing his profession. Besides his regular work, he was here engaged in political labors, being elected councilman for the counties of Yamhill and Clatsop to serve in the territorial legislature in 1856. He resigned his seat, however, in 1857, and moved to Corvallis, where he practiced medicine for many years. Here also political preferment was bestowed; and he was elected judge of Benton county. In 1864 he was re-elected, serving until his resignation a year later. During this year he enjoyed that delightful experience of a trip to the old home in Ohio, and a visit to the National capital. While at the seat of government he succeeded...

Biography of Anderson Cox

ANDERSON COX. – There has never lived a man in the Northwest more worthy of commemoration than that pioneer of 1845, Anderson Cox. He was born near Dayton, Ohio, in 1812, of Quaker parentage, and moved with the family to Indiana in 1830, and claimed a share in the home formed on the Wabash river at Attica. He was married in 1836 to Miss Julia Walter, and in 1840 removed to New London, Iowa. In 1845, with his wife and four children, he made the journey to Oregon, and was in the company of immigrants who endured the privations and rugged experiences of the “Meek cut-off”. At the Des Chutes, the crossing of this turbulent river was effected by drawing the loaded wagon-beds over as ferries by means of ropes. Two canoes served to convey the family and their goods from The Dalles to a point known as Parker’s cabin, on the Lower Columbia. A return to The Dalles from this point was attempted, with flour for the immigrants still coming, and with the purpose of bringing down the wagons left at the mission. The journey, however, was discontinued at the Cascades, as there the flour was all given away to hungry parties coming from above, and as news was received that the wagons had been burned by the Indians. Returning to the Willamette, he found work and an abiding place for his family at the Salem mission, and the next season went south to the other side of the Santiam river, Mrs. Cox being the second white woman to cross that stream, and selected a Donation claim at...
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