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Barker Genealogy of Tiverton, RI

The Barker family of Tiverton, R. I., and vicinity, represented in that section by many prominent citizens, is one of the earliest settled families of New England. The first of the name of whom there is authentic record was Robert Barker, born in 1616, who came to New England at a very early day with John Thorp. In 1641, with others, he bought from Jonathan Brewster, son of Elder Brewster, a ferry and 100 acres of land at Marshfield. Later he located at Duxbury, where for several years he was a surveyor. His death occurred about 1691. He married Lucy Williams, who died March 7, 1681 or 1682.

Rounseville Family of Fall River, MA

The Rounsville or Rounseville family of ancient Freetown is believed to be of French origin, and a family tradition has it that they left France on account of religious persecution. It is the purpose here to refer to a branch of the Freetown Rounseville family which in time found its way into the busy manufacturing center of southeastern Massachusetts – Fall River – and soon became a part of the great activity there. Reference is made to the family of the late Capt. Cyrus Cole Rounseville, a master mariner of Freetown, who sailed from New Bedford in the whaling service, whose son and namesake Cyrus Cole Rounseville has long been one of the leading manufacturers of Fall River as treasurer of the Shove Mills, prominent in public life and identified with the banking interests of the city.

Descendants of William Swift of New Bedford, MA

For an hundred years and more the Swift family in and about New Bedford has been one of prominence, wealthy and influential not only in their several local communities but out through the Commonwealth and into the nation, where their extensive enterprises have extended. These Acushnet-New Bedford Swifts, a branch of the Cape Cod family, brought to their new field of effort that activity, industry, ability and honesty that had for generations characterized their forefathers and also the line of business that had enriched earlier generations in the old home section – the dealing in live oak timber and its manufacture into water craft, in shipbuilding for not only the United States government, but for those across the water. Reference is here made especially to some of the sons, grandsons and great-grandsons of William Swift, of the town of Falmouth, this Commonwealth, among whose sons were Hon. Elijah, Thomas, William, John and Reuben E.; and among the sons of the latter Rodolphus Nye and William Cole Nye Swift, who with their sons together and in turn figured most prominently in and about New Bedford and abroad, as intimated; and some of their sons are yet active here and in the Massachusetts metropolis.

Howland Family of Duxbury, MA

HOWLAND. Arthur and Henry Howland are believed to have come to America together and probably before 1625; they appeared in Plymouth Colony in the early days of its settlement. They were members of the Society of Friends and most of their descendants for many generations were, and many at the present time are, Friends. Arthur lived for a few years in Plymouth, then became a landholder and resident of Marshfield; while Henry, the progenitor of the Ancient Dartmouth Howland family, the branch here specially considered, lived at Duxbury. The first mention of him in New England is that made in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624. Perhaps none of the colonists have a better record for intelligence, thrift, uprightness and unmixed faith in the Divine One than Henry Howland, and these virtues have permeated the lives of his posterity. In general they are a family of great respectability, and as a people thrifty, economical and good managers of finance, most of them having a fair share of this world’s goods, some amassing millions. Henry Howland was made a freeman in 1633; was chosen constable for Duxbury in 1635; bought land there in 1640; was for some years surveyor of highways; served repeatedly on the grand jury, etc. He joined the Society of Friends, perhaps 1657, and was not a little persecuted thereafter on this account. In 1652, associated with others, he bought a large tract of land in Dartmouth; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown in 1659, and in the division of 1660 he received for his share...

Miller Family of Middleboro MA

ABISHAI MILLER, than whom no man connected with the iron industry in New England stood higher in reputation for skill and efficiency in workmanship, and at the time of his death, Jan. 30, 1883, president of the Atlantic Works, which he had helped to organize and in the prosperity of which he had long been a vital factor, was born June 22, 1809, in Fall Brook, Middleboro, Mass., son of John and Susanna (Sparrow) Miller, and a member of a family which located in that town in the seventeenth century. John Miller, a native of England, born in 1624, was a member of the Grand Inquest at Middleboro in 1672. He was among the proprietors of the Twenty-six Men’s Purchase (1661-62) at their meeting in 1677. Previous to April 29, 1678, he bought a house lot of Edward Gray. He was the owner of lot No. 154 in the South Purchase (1673), and was one of the owners of the Sixteen Shilling Purchase (1675). Mr. Miller lived on Thompson street not far from the brook near the house of the late Elijah Shaw, in Middleboro. He died May 11, 1720, in the ninety-seventh year of his age. His monument stands in the cemetery at “The ‘ Green,” where rest the remains of six or more generations of his descendants. The Christian name of the wife of Mr. Miller was Mercy, and their children were: John, Mary and Elizabeth. John Miller (2), son of John, born in 1669, married Feb. 12, 1701-02, Lydia Coombs, born in 1678, daughter of Francis and Deborah (Morton) Coombs. He lived in Middleboro, and there...

Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a recent biographer says: “Among the many citizens of New Bedford and Dartmouth who have achieved high honor, and whose names are held in respect wherever they are known, are Henry H. Crapo and his son William W. Crapo. Born on a Dartmouth farm, from the sterile soil of which his parents could no more than wrest a livelihood, Henry H. Crapo showed his inborn attributes by closing his life in the highest office which the people of the State of Michigan could confer upon him.” And again, “The strong mental as well as physical resemblance of the son to the father is a striking; illustration of Galton’s doctrine of heredity,” this last having especial reference to William W. Crapo. The Crapo family with its allied connections is of original New England stock. (I) Peter Crapaud (Crapo), the progenitor of the family, was a young French lad cast ashore from a wreck off Cape Cod about 1680. His real name is unknown, but he was nicknamed “Crapaud,” the generic designation of a Frenchman. He was “put out” to Francis Combes, an inn-holder, of North Rochester, Mass. On May 31, 1701, he was married to Penelope White, daughter of Samuel White of Rochester, a son of Resolved White, who came to Plymouth in the “Mayflower” with his father, William White, in...

Biography of James E. Barnard

James E. Barnard is a lawyer of prominence at Franklin, N.H., his native place. He was born on January 29, 1863, son of the Hon. Daniel and Amelia (Morse) Barnard. His father, Daniel Barnard, was born January 23, 1827, in Orange, N.H. Naturally of a studious turn of mind, as a youth he attended the academy in winter, and worked on his father’s farm in the summer months. He subsequently taught school in different counties of New Hampshire. In 1851 he began to read law with the Hon. George W. Nesmith, and in 1854 he became junior partner in a law firm with the Hon. Austin F. Pike. Mr. Nesmith retired from active business in 1863; and Mr. Barnard withdrew from the connection he had formed, and started out for himself at Franklin, where he had a large practice for over thirty years. In 1860-62 he was State Representative, in 1865-66 President of the State Senate, 1870-71 member of the Governor’s Council, in 1872 he was a member of the Republican Committee that met in convention at Philadelphia, Pa., in 1867 he was County Solicitor, and in 1872 he was re-elected to that position. He was a Trustee of the Franklin Savings Bank, and was a Director and also Vice-President of the Franklin National Bank of Franklin Falls. He was appointed Attorney General in 1887, and held the office until his death. His reputation as a lawyer was very high, and he was identified with all the leading enterprises in Franklin. He and William M.; Emma S.; Mary A.; James E., the subject of this article; Daniel, Jr., who...

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