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Biography of Aaron B. Perine

Aaron B. Perine. One of the few remaining of the old pioneers of Kansas. Aaron B. Perine, of Topeka, came to this state sixty-three years ago, and has been a permanent resident of Kansas since 1854, except for the two years he was out of the state. In the early days he was engaged in work among the Indians for the Government, later turned his attention to the blacksmithing trade, and for many years now has been at the head of the successful Perine Plow Works. He was born at Dansville, Livingston County, New York, May 4, 1836, and is a son of John W. and Mariett (Ingalls) Perine. Daniel Perrin (as the name was then spelled) was one of the Huguenots who fled from persecution from France, finally seeking refuge in America. On shipboard he met Maria Thorel, who later became his wife, and Aaron B. Perine is a direct descendant of these immigrants. His grandfather, William Perine, served eight years under Gen. George Washington in the Revolutionary war and attained the rank of captain. His father, John W. Perine, was a tanner by trade (then called the tan currier trade), and for the most part he and his wife passed their lives in Livingston County, New York. Aaron B. Perine passed his boyhood and youth in several counties of New York and received but a limited education as a lad, his father having died when he was but ten years old. His youthful energies were devoted to learning the blacksmith’s trade, which he followed for a time in New York, and in October, 1854, when eighteen years...

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Morley Worden

Worden, Arthur Morley; manager Worden-Crawford Co.; born, Dansville, N. Y., Aug. 21, 1887; son of Charles Arthur and Jane Morley Worden; educated, University of Pennsylvania, class of 1909, B. of Econ.; director Worden-Crawford Co., and mgr. Cleveland office; member Kappa Sigma Fraternity; Hermit and Rotary...

Biography of Rev. James T. Dougherty

When De Nonville and his French army, in 1687, destroyed the Indian village of Gannagaro and Gaudougarae, the inhabitants were driven eastward and formed a village near the foot of Canandaigua Lake, which village and lake have since then borne that name. Among the Indian inhabitants in those days were many Catholics, some of them Senecas and most of them Hurons and Algonquin captives, the result of fifty years of missionary labor of the zealous Jesuits. Even in our day the beads and crucifixes given the Indians by the missionaries are still picked up on the sites of the old Indian towns. Following the revolution and the white settlement of western New York, Canandaigua became a prominent center of commerce and government, and no doubt many Catholics were among the pioneers. The family of Hugh Collins came as early as 1823, others followed, and there are traditions of lumber wagons leaving here Saturday afternoons to bring the people to the Sunday mass at St. Patrick’s in Rochester. About 1840 Rev. Bernard O’Reilly, of Rochester, said the first mass in Canandaigua in the Patrick Doyle house on Antis street. Mass was celebrated in various homes for the following few years. At length, in 1844, a lot was purchased by Father O’Reilly from Thomas Beals, and in the fall of 1846 the pew books give the following list of pewholders. On the south side of the church: Bernard Scandling, Bridget Garvey, Hugh Collins, Patrick White, Patrick Doyle, Michael Coyle, Catherine Hanavin, Agnes King, John Whalen, William Lysaght, Eleanor Gannon, James Ryan, Patrick Sherry, Matthew- Carroll, Hugh Keefe, James Gleason, James Cooney,...

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