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Biography of John C. Pillsbury

John C. Pillsbury, a prominent resident of Danbury, was born here, January 18, 1832, son of John and Nancy (Colby) Pillsbury. The grandfather, Samuel Pillsbury, was one of the early settlers Salisbury and a representative of the famous Pillsbury family who originally came from Rowley, Mass. A blacksmith as well as a farmer, he followed his trade in Salisbury. He lived nearly opposite the home of Daniel Webster, and the two young men grew up together. In his later years he came to Danbury, where he spent his last days, dying at the age of fifty years. He was a soldier of the Continental army during the Revolutionary War, and fought in the battle of Bunker Hill. His wife was a Pingaree, and a connection of Governor Pingaree. John Pillsbury, born in Salisbury, N.H., was a farmer. He took up the land now occupied by his son, and built the house which stands upon it. He spent all his days upon this place after coming to Danbury, with the exception of a short time during which he worked in Cambridge, Mass. His death occurred December 17, 1868. He married Nancy Colby, of Franklin, N.H., who died October 6, 1877. Their children, John C. and Mary A., survived them. Mary, born July 17, 1839, married Smith J. Roby, and had two children, one of whom is deceased. Her other child, Cora B., is now the wife of John Huntoon, of Danbury. Mrs. Roby died June 26, 1877. After receiving his education in the Danbury schools, John C. Pillsbury learned the stone-cutter’s trade, which he afterward followed for about ten years....

Biography of Hon. John C. Linehan

Hon. John C. Linehan . – “A hundred years after the Puritans and Pilgrims made a settlement on the coast of New England there came to this country a multitude of emigrants, mostly from the north of Ireland, who soon became absorbed into the ranks of the first settlers, and became the very best of citizens. In the contest for independence they rendered the most efficient services to the colonies, as they had previously done in protecting the frontiers from the inroads of the Indians. After another century, our doors having been opened wide for the reception of people from every country, there came to these shores a tide of emigration from Central and Southern Ireland, which seemed at one time as if it would depopulate the Emerald Isle. In numbers like the countless hosts of the Goths and Vandals who overran the Roman Empire, but pacific in their intentions, they sought in America homes for themselves and their children, where, under the flag and protection of the young republic, they could enjoy that liberty which had been denied them in their old home, and secure those advantages which thrift and industry offered in the New World. “When the country of their adoption was in danger from organized rebellion, none hastened to its defence with more zeal and courage than these newly made citizens. In the baptism of blood that followed, the heterogeneous mass was welded into one great people.” One of these later emigrants was John Cornelius Linehan, the well-known Insurance Commissioner of New Hampshire, who was born in Macroom, Cork County, Ireland, on February 9, 1840, son...

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