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Biography of Bula D. Croker

Croker, Bula D. (See Grant and Ghigau)—Bula D. Edmondson, born on Beatties Prairie, Feb. 17, 1884 educated in the Cherokee National schools and graduated from Female Seminary May 29, 1902 Being possessed of superior historic talents she specialized in music and expression in Boston and in New York City. Having a brilliant personality and much of the impelling magnetic qualities of her distinguished Uncle, Wm. W. Hastings she soon rose to an eminent rank in her chosen profession. She married in New York City, Richard Croker, a native of Black Rock, Ireland and Chieftain of Tammany Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Croker divide their time between their home in New York City, Miami, Florida and their castle in Ireland. Joseph Martin, born about 1740 on his father’s plantation near Charlottesville, Virginia. He became a fur trader and planter amassing a great deal of wealth. His place in the revolutionary army was: elected Captain of the Transylvania Militia in 1 776, became Major February 17, 1779, Lieutenant Colonel in March 1781. Elected Brigadier General of the North Carolina Militia by legislature on December 15, 1787, and was commissioned Brigadier General of the Twentieth Brigade of Virginia Militia by Governor Henry Lee on December 11, 1792. Martinsville, county seat of Henry County, Virginia and the place of his residence was named for him. He died at his home in Virginia on December 18, 1808, was buried with military and Masonic honors. General Joseph Martin married Susannah Fields Nee Emory and their children were; John, born October 20, 1781, was the first Treasurer and first Supreme Judge of the Cherokee Nation. He was...

Slave Narrative of Rev. Eli Boyd

Person Interviewed: Rev. Eli Boyd Location: Dade County, Florida Dade County, Florida, Folklore Ex-Slaves Reverend Eli Boyd was born May 29, 1864, four miles from Somerville, South Carolina on John Murray’s plantation. It was a large plantation with perhaps one hundred slaves and their families. As he was only a tiny baby when freedom came, he had no “recomembrance” of the real slavery days, but he lived on the same plantation for many years until his father and mother died in 1888. “I worked on the plantation just like they did in the real slavery days, only I received a small wage. I picked cotton and thinned rice. I always did just what they told me to do and didn’t ever get into any trouble, except once and that was my own fault. “You see it was this way. They gave me a bucket of thick clabber to take to the hogs. I was hungry and took the bucket and sat down behind the barn and ate every bit of it. I didn’t know it would make me sick, but was I sick? I swelled up so that I all but bust. They had to doctor on me. They took soot out of the chimney and mixed it with salt and made me take that. I guess they saved my life, for I was awful sick. “I never learned to read until I was 26 years old. That was after I left the plantation. I was staying at a place washing dishes for Goodyear’s at Sapville, Georgia, six miles from Waycross. I found a Webster’s spelling book that had...

Slave Narrative of Annie Trip

Person Interviewed: Annie Trip Location: Dade County, Florida “My name’s Annie Trip. How my name’s Trip, I married a Trip, but I was borned in Georgia in the country not so very far from Thomasville. I’m sure you must ha’ heard of Thomasville, Georgia. Well, that’s where I was borned, on Captain Hamlin’s plantation. “Captain Hamlin, he was a greatest lawyer. Henry Hamlin, you know he was the greatest lawyer what ever was, so dey tell me. You see I was small. My mother and father and four brothers all lived there together. Some of the rest were too small to remember much, but dey wuz all borned dare just de samey. Wish I wuz dare right now. I had plenty of food then. I didn’t need to bother about money. Didn’t have none. Didn’t have no debts to pay, no bother not like now. “Now I have rheumatism and everything, but no money. Didn’t need any money on Captain Hamlin’s plantation.” And Annie walked away complaining about rheumatism and no money, etc. before her exact age and address could be...

Slave Narrative of Hattie Thomas

Person Interviewed: Hattie Thomas Location: Dade County, Florida Hattie Thomas was six years old when peace was declared. She was ‘borned’ near Custer, Ga. on Bob Morris’ plantation. At the tender age of five, she can remember of helping to care for the other children, some of whom were her own brothers and children, for her mother kept her eight children with her. Bob Morris’ plantation being a large one, the problem of feeding all the slaves and their children was, in itself, a large one. Hattie can well remember of ‘towing’ the milk to the long wooden troughs for the children. Her mother and the other servants would throw bread crusts and corn breads into the milk troughs and when they would become well-soaked, all the little slave-children would line up with their spoons. “So it happened that the ones who could eat the fastest would be the ones who would get the fattest. “We had a good plenty to eat and it didn’t make much difference how it was served. We got it just the same and didn’t know any better. “We stayed on after de ‘mancipation an’ ah wants t’ tell y’ ah worked hard in dose days. Of course, ah worked hardest after Peace wuz declared. “I wuz on dat plantation when there wuz no matches. Yes, dat wuz befo’ matches wuz made an’ many-a time ah started fire in de open fire place by knookin’ two stones together until I’d sen’ sparks into a wad o’cotton until it took fire. “Now, mind y’ this was on Bob Morrison’s plantation between Custard and Cotton Hill,...

Slave Narrative of Fannie McCay

Person Interviewed: Fannie McCay Location: Dade County, Florida Age: 73 Fannie McCay, 1720 NW 3rd Court, Miami, Florida was born on a plantation while her father and mother were slaves; she claims her age is 73 years which would make her too young to remember “mancipation” but nevertheless she was slave property of her master and could have been sold or given away even at that tender age. Her parents, too, “stayed on” quite a while after the “mancipation”. Being one of those who “didn’t have too much time to talk too much,” her main statement was: “‘Bout all hi ken ‘member is dat hi hused go hout wid de old folks when dey went out to pick cotton. Hi used to pick a little along. “I had plenty to eat and when we went away, my Massy had a little calf that I liked so well. I begged my Massy to give it to me, but he never gave me...

Slave Narrative of Priscilla Mitchell

Person Interviewed: Priscilla Mitchell Location: Dade County, Florida Priscilla Mitchell, 1614 NW 5th Ave., was born in Macon County, Alabama, March 17, 1858. “Y’ see, ah wuz oney 7 years old when ah wuz ‘mancipated. I can ‘member pickin’ cotton, but I didn’t work so hard, ah wuz too young. “I wuz my Massy’s pet. No, no he wouldn’t beat me. Whenever ah’s bad or did little things that my mother didn’t want me to do and she’d go to whip me, all I needed to do was to run to my Massy and he’d take me up and not let my mother git me.” This is a sample of the attitude that very many have toward their...

Slave Narrative of Charley Roberts

Person Interviewed: Charley Roberts Location: Dade County, Florida Charley Roberys of Perrine, Florida, was born on the Hogg plantation near Allendale, S. C. “Yes, sah, I’ members de vary day when we first heard that we was free. I was mindin’ the little calf, keepin’ it away from the cow while my mother was milkin’. “We have to milk the cows and carry the milk to the Confederate soldiers quartered near us. “At that time, I can ‘member of the soldiers comin’ ‘cross the Savannah River. They would go to the plantations and take all the cows, hogs, sheep, or horses they wanted and “stack” their guns and stay around some places and kill some of the stock, or use the milk and eat corn and all the food they wanted as they needed it. They’d take quilts and just anything they needed. “I don’t know why, but I remember we didn’t have salt given to us, so we went to the smoke house where there were clean boards on the floor where the salt and grease drippings would fall from the smoked hams hanging from the rafters. The boards would be soft and soaked with salt and grease. Well, we took those boards and cooked the salt and fat out of them, cooked the boards right in the bean soup. That way we got salt and the soup was good. “They used to give us rinds off the hams. I was a big boy before I ever knew there was anything but rinds a pork meat. We went around chewing away at those rinds of hams, and we...

Slave Narrative of Rivana Boynton

Person Interviewed: Rivana Boynton Location: Dade County, Florida Rivana-Williams Boynton was born on John and Mollie Hoover’s plantation near Ulmers, S.C. being 15 years of age when the ‘mancipation came. “Our Boss man, he had planty of salves. We lived in a log houses. My father was an Indian and he ran away to war, but I don’t ‘member anything of my mother. She was sold and taken away ‘fore I ever knew of her. I ‘member that I had to thin cotton in the fields and mind the flies in the house. I had a leafy branch that was cut from a tree. I’d stand and wave that branch over the table to keep the flies out of the food. I’d work like that in the day time and at night I’d sleep in my uncle’s shed. We had ling bunks along the side of the walls. We had no beds, just gunny sacks nailed to the bunks, no slats, no springs, nothing else. You know how these her sortin’ trays are made, – these her trays they use to sort oranges and ‘matoes. Well, we had to sleep on gunn sack beds. They had weavin’ looms where they made rugs and tings. I used to help ’em tear rags and sew ’em an’ make big balls and then they’d weave those rugs, – rag rugs, you know. That’s what we had to cover ourselves with. We didn’t hd no quilts nor sheets not noting like that. I ‘member well when the war was on. I used t turn to corn sheller and sack the shelled corn for...

Tequesta Indians

Tequesta Indians or Tekesta Indians – Meaning unknown. Tequesta Connections. The language of this tribe was probably connected with the languages of the other peoples of the southeast coast of Florida and with that of the Calusa, and may have been Muskhogean. Tequesta Location. In the neighborhood of Miami. Tequesta Villages. Besides Tekesta proper, the main town, four villages are mentioned between that and the next tribe to the north, the Jeaga, to whom some of the villages may have belonged. These were, in order from south to north: Tavuacio, Janar, Cabista, and Custegiyo. Tequesta History. The Tekesta do not appear in history much before the time of Fontaneda, who was a captive among the Calusa from 1551 to 1569. In 1566 we learn that they protected certain Spaniards from the Calusa chief, although the latter is sometimes regarded as their overlord. A post was established in their country in 1566 but abandoned 4 years later. Attempts made to convert them to Christianity at that time were without success. In 1573 they are said to have been converted by Pedro Menendez Marques, but later they returned to their primitive beliefs. It was these Indians who, according to Romans (1775), went to Cuba in 1763 along with some others from this coast. Tequesta Population. Mooney (1928) estimates that in 1650 there were 1,000 Indians on the southeast coast of Florida. According to Romans those who went to Cuba in 1763 had 30 men. Adair (1775) says there were 80 families. Connection in which they have become noted. Although the name has found no topographical lodgement, the Tekesta may be remembered...

Dade County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Dade County Cemetery Records Hosted at Dade County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Charlotte Jane Memorial Park Cemetery, aka Grove’s Bahamian Coconut Grove Library Cemetery Palms Memorial Park Cemetery Palm-Woodlawn Cemetery, aka Naranja Cemetery Pinewood (Cocoplum) Cemetery Silvergreen Cemetery Dade County Cemetery Records Hosted at Interment.net Lakeside Memorial Park Miami Memorial...
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