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Biography of Charles W. Fleming

Charles W. Fleming, editor and proprietor of the Phoenix, one of Riverside’s enterprising journals, was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1858. He started in life’s work when about fifteen years of age, as an apprentice in a printing office at Mt. Holly Springs, and served an apprentice-ship of three years. When eighteen years of age he struck out for the great West, locating in Lincoln, Nebraska. He then established himself at his trade, and was engaged with the State Journal Company for some eight years. In 1885 he resumed his westward march, and in April of that year came to Riverside. He worked as a journeyman on the Riverside Press for some months, and then established the Commercial Job Office, which he conducted until 1887, and then sold to the Enterprise Company. During the next year Mr. Fleming was engaged in real estate and insurance business. In June, 1888, the Tribune Publishing Company was incorporated, and the publication of the Riverside Daily Tribune started, with Mr. Fleming as business manager. The publication of that paper was suspended, December 30, 1888, and later he bought the presses, type, etc., and engaged in job printing, and June 1, 1889, issued the first number of the Phoenix, a weekly paper. He is the editor and proprietor of the paper, and also proprietor of the Phoenix Job Printing-office. Mr. Fleming has spent his life in printing and publishing enterprises, and is thoroughly a master of his calling. His paper is independent and outspoken, but, like its proprietor, may always be found supporting Riverside’s interests. He is a member of the Board of...

Biography of Dr. William Plunkett

Esther, daughter of John Harris, married Dr. William Plunkett, who was born in Ireland of noble family. In personal appearance he is described as of large stature, great muscular development and strength, while an imperious disposition was among his distinguishing mental traits. This is attested by several occurrences in his career which yet retain a place in the traditions of the locality which he afterward lived in Pennsylvania. On one occasion with several boon companions, he was engaged in some hilarious proceedings at an Irish inn. The adjoining room was occupied by an English nobleman, who had a curious and valuable watch, which he sent to Plunkett with a wager that he could not tell the time by it. Dr. Plunkett put the watch in his pocket and sent a message to the Englishman that he should call upon him in person if he wished to know the time, but the Englishman never called and it is said that Plunkett kept the watch to the end of his life. Afterward he became involved in an assault on an English officer who was seriously injured and he was smuggled on board a vessel in a barrel or hogshead and thus came to America. He located at Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, then on the western frontier, and he lived there during the French and Indian war, in which he was commissioned a lieutenant of the Fort Augusta Regiment of Northumberland county, and for his services received a grant of several hundred acres of land on the west branch of the Susquehanna river. To his property he gave the name of Soldiers’...

Biography of Jeremiah L. Seitz

Jeremiah L. Seitz is one of the pioneers of McPherson County. He came to Kansas a short time after the close of the Civil war, in which he had served as one of the youngest volunteers on the Union side. As a homesteader, farmer, public official and business man he had played a worthy and influential role in McPherson County since pioneer days. He is still active and had a good business as a collecting agent and auctioneer. Mr. Seitz was born April 16, 1847, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob and Barbara (Shellebarger) Seitz. His parents were natives of Germany and came to America when quite young. His father came over in 1831. The father was born in 1812 and the mother in 1814. They were married at Decatur, Illinois, in 1839. Jacob Seitz, who followed the business of merchant tailor, permanently located at Decatur in 1857, and lived there half a century, until his death, October 14, 1907. The mother died at Decatur September 20, 1876. There were five children, four sons and one daughter. John, the oldest, born in 1840, was a private soldier in Company B of the Eighth Illinois Infantry and was killed in battle at Fort Donelson in 1862. David W., the second in age, was born in May, 1842, and is now a veterinary surgeon and stock man at Bement, Illinois. Daniel, born in July, 1844, combines farming with his duties as preacher in the United Brethren Church at Oakley, Illinois. The next in age is Jeremiah L. William, the youngest, was born in July, 1849, and is a farmer at Hammond,...

Carlisle Indian School Record of Living Graduates

In presenting the following record of the graduates of the Carlisle School, than which no like school in the country can show a better record, it is desired to call attention to several facts to which the reader should give careful attention. First. The Carlisle School is not a university. The character of its academic work, with the exception of that of the business and the telegraphy departments, is of the grammar grade. Some studies which are included in the regular high school course are taught, but no so called higher education is given. Consequently, its record should be compared with schools of a similar character among the white people; and in comparison with these, or even in comparison with our colleges, the total number who have made good will compare to splendid advantage. Out of the total of 514 graduates, only five have been so called failures; the rest have made a marked success in their various spheres of activity. Second. Attention is invited to the fact that Carlisle has inspired a large number of its graduates with the desire for further advanced, collegiate education. It will be seen from their records that a number of Indians who have been graduated at this school have continued their way in institutions of higher learning, and in practically all such cases have worked their way through. Third. In the record of the women graduates, it will be noted that 142 are housekeepers. It will thus be seen that their education has not weaned them away from married life. A careful examination of the records of these young ladies shows that...
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