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Apalachicola Indians

Apalachicola Tribe. From Hitchiti “Apalachicoli” or Muskogee “Apalachicolo,” signifying apparently “People of the other side,” with reference probably to the Apalachicola River or some nearby stream. Also called: Talwa lako or Italwa lako, “big town,” name given by the Muskogee Indians. Palachicola or Parachukla, contractions of Apalachicola. Apalachicola Connections. This was one of those tribes of the Muskhogean linguistic stock which spoke the Atsik-hata or Hitchiti language, and which included in addition the Hitchiti, Okmulgee, Oconee, Sawokli, Tamali, Mikasuki, Chiaha, and possibly the Osochi. Apalachicola Location. The earliest known home of the Apalachicola was near the river which bears their name in the center of the Lower Creek country. Later they lived for a considerable period at the point where it comes into existence through the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers. (See also Alabama and Florida.) Apalachicola  Subdivisions and Villages. The following names of towns or tribes were given by a Tawasa Indian, Lamhatty, to Robert Beverley (1722) and may well have belonged to the Apalachicola: Aulbdley, Ephtppick, Sonepáh, and perhaps Socsoóky (or Socsósky). The census of 1832 returned two distinct bodies of Indians under the synonyms Apalachicola and Tälw łåko. Apalachicola History. According to Muskogee legend, the ancestors of the Muskogee encountered the Apalachicola in the region above indicated, when they entered the country, and they were at first disposed to fight with them but soon made peace. According to one legend the Creek Confederacy came into existence as a result of this treaty. Spanish documents of the seventeenth century are the earliest in which the name appears. It is there used both as the name...

Chiaha Indians

Chiaha Tribe. Meaning unknown though it may contain a reference to mountains or highlands. (Cf. Choctaw and Alabama tcaha, Hitchiti tcäihi, “high.”) Also called: Tolameco or Solameco, which probably signifies “big town,” a name reported by the Spaniards. Chiaha Connections. The Chiaha belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and in later times spoke the Muskogee’ ‘tongue, but there is every reason to class them in the Hitchiti group. (See Apalachicola) Chiaha Location. In later historic times the Chiaha were on the middle course of Chattahoochee River, but at the earliest period at which we have any knowledge of them they seem to have been divided into two bands, one on Burns Island, in the present State of Tennessee, the other in eastern Georgia near the coast. (See also South Carolina and Florida.) Chiaha Subdivisions. The Mikasuki of northern Florida are said to have separated from these people. Chiaha Villages Hawkins (1848) gives the following: Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Aumucculle, on a creek of the same name which enters Flint River “45 miles below Timothy Barnard’s.” Chiahutci, Little Chiaha, a mile and a half west of the Hitchiti town, near Auhegee Creek. Hotalgihuyana, occupied jointly with the Osochi, on the right bank of Flint River...

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