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Biography of Dr. Wesley B. Wasson

DR. WESLEY B. WASSON. The value to any community of a professional man is not marked merely by his learning and skill, his proficiency in medical and surgical practice, but also by his character both private and professional, his honorable adherence to medical ethics and his personal integrity and benevolence of purpose. When a physician combines these characteristics it is with great pleasure that we record his life-work, and such a man do we find in Dr. Wesley B. Wasson. Although but just starting on his career in the medical profession, this young physician and surgeon has already become prominent in his calling and has the confidence of all. He was born on Spring Creek, in Stone County, in 1862, and is a son of John T. and Caroline (McCullah) Wasson, the former born in Darke County, Ohio, February 29, 1820, and the latter in Tennessee, March 10, 1830. Although the father received but a limited education in his youth he was a man possessed of a great amount of good common sense and good judgment. About 1852 he came down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to the mouth of Arkansas River, then up that stream to Ft. Smith, and then by land across the country to Stone County. There he stopped for a time with Alex. McCullah, and soon after married his daughter. From that time until 1867 he remained in Stone County, and then moved to Christian County, locating on Finley River, where he now has a good farm. He is one of the honest, industrious and well-to-do farmers of his section, and has made his property...

Biography of Edward A. Blades

EDWARD A. BLADES. The farming class of America is notable for the degree of intelligence that is possessed among its representatives. Our subject belongs to one of the most progressive of families, and is proud of the fact that his father was one of those fast disappearing landmarks of a heroic past-an early pioneer. Mr. Blades was born in Monroe County, East Tennessee. In 1830, but his parents, Edward and Ellen (Maner) Blades, were natives of North Carolina, where they grew to mature years and united their fortunes. From there they removed to Tennessee, and about 1836 came by ox-team to Greene County, Missouri, being about two months on the road. They located in the woods on the Pickerel, and there was but one house within a distance of five miles. Mr. Blades spent the rest of his life there engaged in cultivating the soil, and died about 1847. He was a great hunter and sportsman, etc., and a man well and favorably known for miles around. He was one of the pioneers of Greene County, settling there when Springfield was but a mere hamlet of log houses, and he contributed his full share toward the improvement and development of the county. He was of English origin. His wife died in Greene County in 1855. They were the parents of an old-fashioned family of fourteen children, as follows: Sally Ann, deceased; R. D., of Billings; Nancy, deceased; Isaac T., Cynthia, Edward A., Rebecca L., William, Elizabeth, James R., Frances, George Washington, and two died young. Our subject was reared amid the rude surroundings of pioneer life, and to obtain...

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