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Dunlavy, Phyllis Lillian Crabill Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Phyllis Lillian Dunlavy, 90, of Corvallis, a former Baker City resident, died Feb. 25, 2004, at her home. Her graveside funeral will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland. The Rev. William McCarthy will officiate. Phyllis was born on June 22, 1913, at Baker City to Roy and Blanche Phillips Crabill. She was the granddaughter of Philander Crabill, an early settler in Baker City. She attended Baker schools and was a Baker High School graduate. She attended Eastern Oregon College of Education (now Eastern Oregon University) at La Grande, which was a two-year normal school at that time. She married Cecil Hauntz in 1933. They had one child and were later divorced. In 1940, Phyllis married L.B. “Curly” Harradine. They made their home at Pendleton. Both were members of the Pendleton Gun Club, where Phyllis won many shooting events. She was the Oregon State Ladies Skeet Champion in 1947-48. She also became a very good golfer. Mr. Harradine died in 1960 and Phyllis returned to Eastern Oregon for a year to renew her teaching certificate. She taught first grade at the Riverside School in Pendleton for 14 years. She married William Dunlavy in 1966. They bought a nine-acre farm 17 miles from Pendleton and Phyllis was able to have a big garden and to grow her own fruits and vegetables. Phyllis and her husband moved to Roseburg in 1984 to be near her daughter. Mr. Dunlavy died in 1989. Phyllis moved to Corvallis in 1996. She loved to travel. She made two trips to Europe and on her 80th birthday, she traveled...

Makinson, Ruth C. Parrish Mrs. – Obituary

Ruth C Makinson, 88, of Corvallis, a former Baker City resident, died March 3, 2003, at Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis. Her memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 29, at McHenry Funeral Home, 206 N.W. Fifth St., in downtown Corvallis. Pastor Ralph Holcomb will officiate. Private interment will be at Pine Haven Cemetery in Halfway. Ruth Makinson was born April 26, 1914, at Dallas, Ore., the daughter of Mabel Guy Parrish and Elbert L. Parrish. She received her education at Dallas, graduating from Dallas High School. She married Joe Martin in 1931 while still in high school and they had a son, Guy Martin. She attended Oregon State College at Corvallis where she received her bachelor’s degree in education. Ruth married Cloyd B “Doc” Makinson on Aug. 29, 1941, at Payette, Idaho. Doc Makinson was born at Halfway. She taught school at Condon. Her husband enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Force in 1942 and she went with him to Maryland while he was in the Army. He was discharged in November 1945 and they moved to Eugene in 1946. Their sons Warren, Clyde and Allen were born in Eugene. Ruth’s husband Cloyd Makinson was a high school vo-ag instructor, teaching from 1946 until 1960 in Eugene. He then worked as a Grange insurance agent from 1960 until his retirement in 1980. Ruth was a housewife, taught at the Eugene Business College, was a substitute teacher in Eugene, and a secretary in the Communication Department at the University of Oregon for the student-operated radio station. The Makinsons moved to Baker City in 1980 after they...

Robbins, Darlene Emma Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Darlene Emma Robbins, 71 died Monday, January 26, 2004 in Baker City, Oregon after a lengthy illness. Memorial services will be held Monday, February 2, 2004 at 11 a.m. in the Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place Street with Rev. Ron Kratzer officiating. Inurnment will follow at Baker Cemetery at a later date. Mrs. Robbins was born September 13, 1932, in Bentonville Arkansas to Austin and Grace Robbins. In 1936, she moved from Nebraska to Ontario, Oregon at the age of four. She graduated from Ontario High School in 1950. She met her future husband while attending the Methodist Church Camp at Wallowa Lake. She married Llewellyn Leroy Robbins on August 26, 1951 in Nyssa, Oregon. They had many things in common including the same last name, though not related. They moved to Corvallis, Oregon where Llewellyn attended Oregon State University majoring in Vocational Agriculture. Darlene worked as telephone operator in Ontario and Corvallis. In 1954, they moved to Heppner, Oregon where Llewellyn accepted his first teaching position. In 1961, they moved to Baker City, where they purchased a farm on Pocahontas Road and Llewellyn continued to teach at the Baker High School. Darlene worked for and became the manager of Montgomery Wards until 1985 when they purchased the franchise. When Montgomery Wards closed all the franchise businesses, they opened Robbins Arrow and continued in the retail business until 1994 when they both officially retired. After retirement, they went to the Ukraine as lay missionaries in 1998 with a group from the Church of the Nazarene to help restore an educational unit. They loved to travel and...

Biography of J. C. Avery

J.C. AVERY. – Mr. Avery, the first owner, and, in almost every respect, the founder of Corvallis, was born in Punckhannock, Pennsylvania, in 1817. He received his education at Wilksbarre, and thereafter studied medicine, but, preferring a less confined life than that necessitated by this profession, went as a pioneer to Illinois in 1837. Engaging in the land business, he at length undertook the life of a farmer, and was married in 1841 to Miss Martha Marsh. Farming upon the prairies at that early day did not prove remunerative; and in 1845 he came alone to Oregon, bringing an ox-team and about twenty-five stock cattle. Making his headquarters at Oregon City, he spent the first months exploring the Willamette valley; and, as all the land on the west side of the river south of the La Creole was absolutely without occupants except Indians, he had only to exert his judgment to select the best site from among the thousand good ones. He chose the plain lying at the Great Bend of the Willamette, where this river approaches nearest the Coast Mountains. Moving upon this place in 1846, he sent for his family, who made the perilous trip across the plains with Sawyer’s company. Upon their arrival, he began the systematic development of his place; for it was not as a farm, but as the site of a city, that he had secured this magnificent situation upon the Willamette. By means of a store – the only one on the west side of Dallas – he facilitated and hastened the settlement of the surrounding region, and made this point the...

Biographical Sketch of James P. Atwood, M.D.

JAMES P. ATWOOD, M.D. – One of the most successful physicians of Baker City, Oregon, is the gentleman whose name appears as the heading of this sketch. A careful and conscientious gentleman of temperate habits, and thoroughly reliable in all public and professional as well as private matters, he enjoys the confidence of the public, and has a large practice. He was born in Wisconsin in 1846, but was educated in Oregon, at Sublimity and at Corvallis, and took his degree in medicine from the medical department of the Willamette University at Salem, and from the medical department of the Willamette University at Salem, and from the medical department of the Columbia College, New York. His father, A.F. Atwood, a pioneer of 1853, lived on his farm four miles from Corvallis until 1868, when he removed to Walla Walla county, Washington Territory where he died March 24, 1889. Dr. Atwood’s first field was at La Grande; but in 1871 he removed to his present location, where he has since been actively employed. Baker City was then but a village of some seven hundred inhabitants, although money was then in abundant circulation. Mining interests still dominate, and will always be pre-eminent. The surrounding region is remarkably healthy, phthisic being almost unknown. The Doctor was married in 1882 to Miss Florence Thompson of San Francisco, California, and has one child...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Martha Burnett

MRS. MARTHA BURNETT.- The subject of this biography was born September 28, 1838, in Franklin county, Missouri, and is the fourth child and oldest daughter of Roland and Elizabeth Hinton. Her parents emigrated to Oregon in 1846, and located their Donation claim in the southern part of Benton county, near Monroe. In her twenty-first year, 1859, she was married, on June 12th, to Honorable John Burnett. They took up their residence in Corvallis, where Judge Burnett entered into the practice of law, and prospered in the practice of his profession. There is a vast difference in the Oregon of 1846 and the Oregon of 1889; and Mrs. Burnett has experienced all the rigors of pioneer life from the time she was a child of tender age until the march of civilization westward took its way. She is now in her fifty-first year, and is surrounded by her family of fine children, and all the comforts which a beautiful home with peace and prosperity can give. She has reached the palm trees and wells of sweet water after a brave and uncomplaining journey through the arid sands of the desert. She has been blessed with seven children, five of whom are living. They are Alice, Ida, Mattie, Brady and...

Biography of Hon. John Burnett

HON. JOHN BURNETT. – Among the prominent self-made men of Oregon is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Pike county, Missouri, on the 4th of July, 1831. He lost his father at the age of fifteen, and was turned out in the world to fight his way as best he might. He first engaged as an errand boy in a store, but, becoming tired of the confinement, at the end of a year hired out to work on a flat-boat on the Mississippi, boating wood to St. Louis. His early education was obtained in the common schools of the country; and, though his opportunities were limited, he laid the foundation upon which he, in after life, built a sound practical education. In the spring of 1849, there being great excitement about the gold discoveries in California and a general rush to the mines, he accepted an outfit form a relative, and though under eighteen years old started “the plains across” to seek his fortune in the new El Dorado. He arrived in Sacramento on the 10th of September with just one five-franc piece in his pocket. During the greater part of the time from that date on he was engaged in mining and dealing in cattle, until the spring of 1858, when he came to Oregon and settled in Benton county, where he has resided since. The year after his arrival in Oregon he was married to Miss Martha Hinton, daughter of Honorable R.B. Hinton of Monroe. This happy union has been blessed with a family of seven children of which three girls and two boys...

Biography of Major James Bruce

MAJOR JAMES BRUCE. – Major Bruce is one of our citizens who needs no introduction to the people of the Northwest; since he is known personally, not only to all the old pioneers, but to most of the second generation of the toilers of Oregon. He was born November 3, 1827, in Harrison county, Indiana, and at the age of ten moved with his parents to Quincy, Illinois. At twenty he began a border career, going to Texas, making many excursions in that then unsettled region, and at Cross Timbers joined Major Johnson’s rangers. He accompanied these troopers upon their expeditions to punish marauders, or to recover the stock which were perpetually stampeded and run off by the Indians. In one of these ventures he was engaged with his company in a fight with three hundred of the savages, whose rapid movements, impetuous charges, and ability to suddenly concentrate, or to miraculously disappear and reappear, seemed to multiply their number to about one thousand. Here the Major first saw their maneuvers and astonishing feats, such as riding concealed on one side of their horses. In 1849 he returned to his home in Illinois, and in the spring of 1850 was ready to go to the mines of California, – a trip even more eventful than that to Texas. He performed the long journey in the summer, using ox-teams as the means of travel, and having as his companion George Collins. Making but a short stoppage in the old mines of California, he urged his way to the northern part of that state to the Shasta or Redding diggings, where...

Biography of Col. John Colgate Bell

COL. JOHN COLGATE BELL. – Colonel Bell, enjoying a wide reputation from Southern Oregon to Idaho, and back again to the Pacific seashore throughout the state in which he has successively lived and made a multitude of personal acquaintances, merits a special recognition on account of his public services in official relations and in the early Indian wars of Southern Oregon. He was born at Sterling, Kentucky, February 24, 1814. His parents were from Virginia; and among his ancestors were those distinguished in the early history of the nation, his father having served with General Harrison in the war of 1812. The young man received his education at the Mount Sterling Academy, and began business at his native town in the dry-goods store of David Herren. In 1834, he began his western career by removing with his father to Missouri, engaging with him in mercantile business at Clarksville, Pike county. Eight years later he entered into business on his own account at Weston, and in 1845 was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of General Thompson Ward, of honorable fame in the Mexican war. In 1847 he was engaged with the General in organizing the regiments of Donovan and Price and the battalion of Major Powell sent to new Fort Kearney on the plains for the protection of emigrants. It was in these operations that he received his military rank. In 1849 he gratified his desire for a life wider than that of the east by setting forth with Doctor Belt, a brother-in-law, for the El Dorado of the Pacific. The journey was accomplished amid the usual difficulties of...

Biography of Hon. James Abner Bennett

HON. JAMES ABNER BENNETT. – Our subject was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, on March 17,1808. His birthplace was a farm; and here he remained with his parents until 1830, when he moved to Boone county. He resided here for three years, and then removed to Jackson county, Missouri, near the town of Independence, and in 1839 again removed to Platt county. The following year, 1840, he was married to Miss Louisa E.R. Bane, of Weston, Missouri. Here Mr. Bennett remained, following blacksmithing and conducting a livery stable. He also acted as justice of the peace until the year 1842. There also was a son born to them, John R. Bennett. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett moved from here to Jackson county, Missouri, where they lived until 1850, in the meanwhile suffering the loss of their son, who died April 18,1848. In 1849 Mr. Bennett came on a prospecting tour to California. On his return, Mrs. Bennett made preparations and started with him for Oregon, traveling with ox-teams in company with some thirty other families, Judge Bennett being elected captain of the train. They started on May 9th, and after a wearisome journey of five months’ duration reached Oregon on October 2, 1850. They at once located on their beautiful farm near Corvallis; and, the settlers soon recognizing true worth, he was elected a senator in the territorial legislature from Benton county, and in 1857 was re-elected over all competitors. He also was once assessor of the county, and served as sheriff for one term. He occupied himself in farming and stock-raising, and drove cattle to California to the mines....
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