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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Biography of William Tasker

William Tasker, one of the prominent residents of Contoocook, was born August 21, 1852, in Pittsfield, this county, son of William and Mary (Lougee) Tasker. The grandfather, Joseph Tasker, and his brothers, John and Paul, removing from Newington, near Portsmouth, were the first settlers of Barnstead. Paul Tasker died leaving no family. Joseph followed the trade of shoemaker. He married Sally True, of Pittsfield, at which place they both died, he about the year 1878, and she in 1884. His son, the Rev. Joseph O. Tasker, is a Congregational minister at Short Falls, Epsom township, this county. William Tasker, Sr., another son of Joseph, born in Barnstead, Belknap County, was also a shoemaker. He was a resident of Pittsfield, where he died in 1859, at the age of forty, leaving one son, the subject of this sketch. William Tasker passed his boyhood in Pittsfield, receiving his education in the academy, and working in a store during his vacations, his father’s home being in the village. He yet owns this place, where his mother still lives. Subsequently he worked in the gristmill of Weeks Brothers, until it was burned in 1880. He then came to Contoocook, and worked for a year and a half as miller in the Pittsfield, and bought an ice business, and conducted it for five years. In 1883 he was chosen Selectman, and in the following year he was made Chairman of the Board. Among several matters of importance dealt with by the Board in the five years during which he was a member, the most noteworthy was, perhaps, the opening of a system of sewerage...

Biography of Stephen C. Pattee

Stephen C. Pattee, one of the most prominent, skilful, and prosperous agriculturists of Merrimack County, New Hampshire, lives in Warner, on a highly improved farm known as Maple Grange, which has been owned and occupied by his family for more than one hundred years. He was born on this ancestral homestead, January 11, 1828, son of Asa Pattee, and is of distinguished English and Colonial stock, tracing his descent from Sir William Pattee, who was physician to Cromwell and King Charles 2nd., and was knighted in 1660. Peter Pattee, son of Sir William, born in 1648 in Lansdown, England, emigrated to America when a young man of twenty-one years, settled first in Virginia, and a few years later removed to Haverhill, Mass. His grandson, Captain Asa Pattee, commanded a company in one of the Colonial wars, about the middle of the eighteenth century, and later received a Captain’s commission from Governor Mcshech Weare. He was the first of the family to settle in Warner, and built the first frame house in the village, it being now known as the Dr. Eaton house. Captain Asa’s son John, grandfather of Stephen C. Pattee, settled at Maple Grange in 1786, taking up the land when it was in its primeval wildness, and was afterward throughout his years of activity engaged in the pioneer labor of clearing and improving. He was an industrious, temperate man, and lived to the ripe old age of eighty-five years. He married Eunice Sargent, a native of Dover, N.H., and the daughter of Benjamin Sargent, who owned the adjoining farm. They had three sons: Asa; Jesse, who removed...

Biography of Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill

Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill, a well-known public man of Contoocook, is a son of Isaac and Mary (Wyman) Merrill, born October 1, 1814, in Hopkinton village, N.H. The father, a native of Hollis, Hillsborough County, born June 15, 1784, was a cooper by trade, and worked in Boston, Portland, and Troy, N.Y. When Isaac D. was about a year old, the family moved from Hopkinton to Hillsborough Bridge, where his father was employed at his trade. Later, more than sixty years ago, he settled in Contoocook, built the house where the subject of this sketch now resides, worked at his trade for some time longer, and died there, September 8, 1883, aged ninety-nine years, two months, and twenty-four days. He is well remembered in the community, among whom he is still spoken of as “Boss Merrill .” He was a man of strong frame and good health, industrious and apt to outdo his coworkers. Shortly before his death he became blind; and his last years were spent quietly at the homestead with his son, Isaac Darwin Merrill. He had three wives, whom he outlived. His first marriage was made with Mary Wyman, of Deering, who died May 31, 1843. She had eight children, six of whom, three sons and three daughters, reached maturity. The eldest, Clarinda, married Joseph L. Upton, of Contoocook, where she died after passing her eightieth year. Her husband, who was a wheelwright, built their house in Contoocook. The second child, the subject of this sketch, is the only one of this Milton Wyman, who did not marry, resided with his father, and died in 1856,...

Biographical Sketch of John Arthur Jones

John Arthur Jones, a farmer of Hopkinton, was born in Contoocook, N.H., April 3, 1864, son of John F. and Maria (Barnard) Jones. His grandfather was a resident of Hopkinton for the greater part of his life. John F. Jones, who was born in Hopkinton, is now a resident of Concord, John Arthur Jones, the subject of this sketch, received his early education in the public schools of his native town and in the academy. Later he was a student at Colby Academy, New London, for a time. From New London he returned to Hopkinton, and went to his grandfather’s farm, which was soon put under his management. He is the only representative of the family in the town. On the homestead, which contains about one hundred and sixty acres, he is engaged in dairying and stock-raising, having a fine herd of Guernsey cattle. His cream, of which his dairy yields a large quantity, is sold in Boston. Mr. Jones is a Democrat in his politics, while he has never held public office. On January 19, 1887, Mr. Jones married Mabel N. Bailey, a native of Newbury and a daughter of George Bailey, then of Hopkinton. Mrs. Jones is a talented musician. Before her marriage she taught school in the county for some time. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have one daughter, Ruth, aged four years. They attend the Baptist church. Mr. Jones is a very successful farmer. The family residence is the old homestead, standing on a beautiful eminence overlooking the Contoocook River and commanding a fine view of the diversified...

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