Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Chief Joseph – Nez Percé

Chief Joseph. Hinmaton-yalatkit. The leader of the Nez Percé in the hostilities of 1877. His mother was a Nez Percé, his father a Cayuse, who re­ceived the name Joseph from his teacher, the missionary Spalding, who was with Dr. A. Whitman and who went to the Idaho country in the late thirties of the 19th century. Chief Joseph’s native name was Hinmaton-yalatkit (Hinmaton, `thunder’; yalatkit, ‘coming from the water up over the land.’ – Miss McBeth), but both he and his brother Ollicot were often called Joseph, as if it were a family name. Joseph was a man of fine presence and impressive features, and was one of the most remarkable Indians within the borders of the Union.

Agreement of July 7, 1883

In the conference with chief Moses and Sar-sarp-kin, of the Columbia reservation, and Tonaskat and Lot, of the Colville reservation, had this day, the following was substantially what was asked for by the Indians: Tonasket asked for a saw and grist mill, a boarding school to be established at Bonaparte Creek to accommodate one hundred pupils (100), and a physician to reside with them, and $100. (one hundred) to himself each year. Sar-sarp-kin asked to be allowed to remain on the Columbia reservation with his people, where they now live, and to be protected in their rights as settlers, and in addition to the ground they now have under cultivation within the limit of the fifteen mile strip cut off from the northern portion of the Columbia Reservation, to be allowed to select enough more unoccupied land in Severalty to make a total to Sar-sarp-kin of four square miles, being 2,560 acres of land, and each head of a family or male adult one square mile; or to move on to the Colville Reservation, if they so desire, and in case they so remove, and relinquish all their claims to the Columbia Reservation, he is to receive one hundred (100) head of cows for himself and people, and such farming implements as may be necessary. All of which the Secretary agrees they should have, and that he will ask Congress to make an appropriation to enable him to perform. The Secretary also agrees to ask Congress to make an appropriation to enable him to purchase for Chief Moses a sufficient number of cows to furnish each one of his...

Spokan Indians

Spokan Indians were located on the Spokane and Little Spokane Rivers, southward to, and perhaps including, Cow Creek, and northward to include all of the northern feeders of the Spokane in the states of Idaho, Montana and Washington.

Senijextee Indians

Senijextee Indians were located on both sides of the Columbia River from Kettle Falls to the Canadian boundary, the valley of Kettle River, Kootenay River from its mouth to the first falls, and the region of the Arrow Lakes, B. C. The Lake Indians on the American side were placed on Colville Reservation.

Kalispel Indians

Kalispel Indians. On Pend Oreille River and Lake, Priest Lake, and the lower course of Clark’s Fork. They were said to have extended east-ward to Thompson Lake and Horse Plains and to have hunted over some of the Salmon River country, Canada, and were formerly said to have extended to Flathead Lake and Missoula.

Methow Tribe

Methow Indians. A Salishan tribe of eastern Washington, formerly living about Methow river and Chelan lake, now chiefly gathered on the Colville reservation.  Their number is not officially...

Senijextee Tribe

Senijextee Indians. A Salish tribe formerly residing on both sides of Columbia River from Kettle falls to the Canadian boundary; they also occupied the valley of Kettle River; Kootenay River form its mouth to the first falls, and the region of the Arrow Lakes, British Columbia.  In 1909 those in the United States numbered 342 on the Colville Reservation,...

Sanpoil Tribe

Sanpoil Indians. A body of Salish on Sans Poil river and on the Columbia below Big bend, Washington.  Gibbs classed them as one of the 8 bands of Spokan and also as one of the 6 bands of Okinagan, they being claimed by both tribes.  In 1905 they were reported to number 324, on the Colville Reservation, but in 1909 their population was given as only 178, the disparity being attributed to duplication in previous counts. No treaty was ever made with these Indians for their lands, the Government taking possession of their country except such portions as have been set apart by Executive order for their...

Sanpoil Indians

Sanpoil Indians. The Sanpoil Indians were located on Sanpoil River and Nespelem Creek and on the Columbia below Big Bend. They were later placed on Sanpoil and Colville Reservations. The Sanpoil belonged to the inland division of the Salishan linguistic stock, and were related most closely to its eastern section.

Pin It on Pinterest