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Biography of Bernhard Teichgraeber

Bernhard Teichgraeber is now sole proprietor of the City Mill and Elevator Company at Emporia. Any institution whose wheels have been turning and whose machinery had been grinding out a useful product for daily consumption during a period of thirty years or more had more than ordinary interest and associations. This is particularly true of the City Mill and Elevator Company of Emporia, which was established prior to 1886 by Doctor Armour, and is one of the landmarks of the city. Its present owner is a practical miller, a profession which had run in the family for several generations, and he had been a resident of Kansas more or less continuously for about thirty years. He is of German origin and birth, born in Saxony, Germany, June 12, 1861. His father, William August Teichgraeber, who was also a miller, was born in Saxony in 1820 and died there in 1878. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. The maiden name of the mother was Antonia Fisher, who was born in Saxony in 1832 and died there in 1873. Their children all came to America, and a brief record of them is as follows: Theodore, a miller, died at Lindsborg, Kansas, at the age of fifty-six; Wilhelmina, wife of William Unger, a retired resident at Salina, Kansas; Bertha, wife of Herman Winkler, a farmer at California, Missouri; Richard, in the milling and cattle business at Eureka, Kansas; Bernhard; William, a miller at Gypsum City, Kansas; Emil, who was formerly one of the owners of the City Mill and Elevator Company at Emporia and who died there in 1908; and...

Biography of Isaac M. Hinds, Hon.

Hon. Isaac M. Hinds. Mound Valley and Labette County have for many years been the scene of the extensive business and public activities of Isaac M. Hinds. Some years ago that district sent Mr. Hinds to represent its interests in the State Senate, and he is still a member of the upper house of the State Legislature. Though he had spent nearly all his years in Kansas, Senator Hinds was born in Cole County, Missouri, December 30, 1862. He was brought to this state when an infant. Going back several generations his Hinds ancestors were Germans who came to America and were early settlers about Bowling Green, Kentucky. The grandfather of Senator Hinds was Benjamin, a native of Kentucky. He went to Missouri and became a pioneer in Cole County, where he died before Senator Hinds was born. Isaac Hinds, father of Senator Hinds, was born in Kentucky in 1833, was reared and married in Missouri, and followed farming as his life’s vocation. He died in Cole County in February, 1863. The maiden name of his wife was Cordelia A. Stephens. She was born in Cole County, Missouri, August 4, 1833, and is still living at the age of eighty-three, making her home with her son, Senator Hinds. She married for her second husband James M. Richardson, who died in Mound Valley, Kansas, where he was a retired farmer. Isaac Hinds and wife had the following children: Benjamin F., who is a mechanic living at Kansas City, Missouri; William M., who died in young manhood at Mound Valley in 1876; Joseph, who died at Mound Valley in 1874; Jennie,...

Biography of Oliver P. Goodall

OLIVER P. GOODALL. – Mr. Goodall, one of our best men in developing Oregon, was born in Jefferson City, Missouri, August, 1828, and grew up on a farm, securing a common-school education. At the age of eighteen he left school and joined Colonel William Bent, and spent the winter of 1846-47 at Bent’s fort on the Arkansas river, in the capacity of clerk. He there met with continuous adventures, associating with such old mountaineers as Kit and Bob Carson, Bridger, the Calloways, Bill Williams, Dick Dallam, Black Dick Curtis and others; and his recitals of their brave and daring deeds and endurance would fill a volume. In 1847 he went to Mexico in the quartermaster’s employ as courier, wagon-master, clerk, and interpreter of Spanish, under Major Sprague, General Howard and others, and remained in Mexico, New Mexico and Texas until the fall of 1849. He met with numerous adventures with Apaches, Mexican guerillas and Comanches, and buried many brave comrades, and was even obliged to leave some unburied. He carries scars in remembrance of Indian arrows, and has vivid recollections of many perils, having been by the side of Major Stein when he was shot in the Sierra Blanco Mountains, where his two bosom companions, Joe Allison and Jim McAllister of Missouri, were left unburied. He also recollects affairs of interest in connection with the Seminole chief, Wildcat, and his sub-chief, Gopher John, a coal-black Negro, campaigning on the Mexican border. In October, 1849, Mr. Goodall was engaged in prospecting for gold in Southern California. In 1850 he had reached El Paso del Norte, and entered the quartermaster’s service....

Biography of Hon. John S. Phelps

The prominence, both State and national, of this most distinguished citizen of Greene county, may well serve as a reason why this sketch is given at greater length than that of other citizens mentioned; however, even this is but the merest outline of a life whose long public service makes up a history which would require a volume in itself, if given in a matter anything like that merited by the distinguished subject. John S. Phelps is the son of Elisha Phelps, and was born in Simsbury, Hartford county, Connecticut, December 22, 1814. The father, Elisha, was a lawyer of great prominence in that State, who served his fellow citizens in the Legislature, in State offices, and three terms in the national Congress. Noah Phelps, father of Elisha and grandfather of John S., was a captain in the Revolution and a most successful scout and spy. He was one of the “committee of safety” that planed the capture of Ticondero. Like his son and grandson, he, too, served the people in legislative and other capacities of public trust. Mr. Phelps was reared in his birthplace, receiving his education in the public schools and in Washington (now Trinity) college at Hartford, completing his course there in 1832. Subsequently, he studied law under his father for three years, and was admitted to the bar on the twenty-first anniversary of his birth. After two years of practice in Hartford, he determined to come West and seek a better and wider field for an ambitious young lawyer. Acting with that wisdom and foresight which has ever characterized him in both public and private...
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