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Biography of J. H. McMorrow

Coming to Bartlesville in 1965, J. H. McMorrow has since been actively and prominently identified with the commercial development of the town and as secretary and treasurer of the Rood Oil Company he has contributed substantially to the attainment of the success which has attended the activities of that corporation. He was born in Cohoes, Albany county, New York, December 9, 1859, of the marriage of Francis and Mary (McCusker) McMorrow, both of whom were natives of Ireland, the latter being brought to this country in infancy. The father came to the United States in 1833, settling in Cohoes, Albany county, New York, where he engaged in the manufacture of axes, which was at that time a hazardous business, owing to the poisonous fumes which emanated from the steel during the sharpening process, and this was the direct cause of his death, which occurred in 1865. In the parish schools of Cohoes, Albany county, New York, J. H. McMorrow pursued his education and he would have entered the military academy at West Point if his parents had not objected to his taking up a military career, owing to the fact that three of his uncles had enlisted in the Civil war, from which they never returned. At the age of fifteen he laid aside his textbooks and became connected with the dry goods business at Cohoes, New York, where he remained until 1888, when he went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and for two years was identified with the carpet and draperies business in that city. From there he went to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he followed the same line of work...

From Albany to Saratoga along the Hudson River

A pleasant tour awaits the traveler who continues his journey north from Albany, where the Delaware and Hudson train for Saratoga is ready at the landing on the arrival of the steamer. A half hour’s run along the west bank gives us a glimpse of Troy across the river with the classical named hills Mount Ida and Mount Olympus. Two streams, the Poestenkill and the Wynant’s Kill, approach the river on the east bank through narrow ravines, and furnish excellent water power. In the year 1786 it was called Ferryhook. In 1787, Rensselaerwyck. In the fall of 1787 the settlers began to use the name of Vanderheyden, after the family who owned a great part of the ground where the city now stands. January 9, 1789 the freeholders of the town met and gave it the name of Troy. The “Hudson,” the “Erie,” and the “Champlain” Canals have contributed to its growth. The city, with many busy towns, which have sprung up around it¬óCohoes, Lansingburg, Waterford, etc., is central to a population of at least 100,000 people. The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the oldest engineering school in America, has a national reputation. Cohoes, where the Mohawk joins Cohoes, comes from an Indian origin and signifies “the island at the falls.” This was the division line between the Mahicans and the Mohawks, and when the water is in full force it suggests in graceful curve and sweep a miniature Niagara. The view from the double-truss iron bridge (960 feet in length), looking up or down the Mohawk, is impressive. Passing through Waterford, and Mechanicville which lies partly in the township of...

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