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Historical Notes on the Work of the Catholic Church in Idaho

As the Catholic Church has ever been the pioneer in civilization, so that we find her name linked with the early history of all lands, so, too, is it true of Idaho. Long before the coming of the first settlers to our present “Gem of the Mountains,” we find the faithful Catholic priest, laboring not for earth’s golden treasures nor ambition’s honored guerdons, but for the upbuilding of that grand edifice whose comer-stone is Christ, for the elevating and saving of souls who, without the ministration of the “Anointed of the Lord,” would never have been drawn from the darkness of semi-barbarism into the bright light of Christian faith. It is fitting, then, that in a history of the state of Idaho the work of the Catholic church be not omitted: so with no apology to the reader of the present volume the author presents the following data carefully gathered from many sources, in the hope that by his feeble pen the work of so many of earth’s noble men may be preserved to future generations as an incentive to devoted labor on the part of their followers, not less than as a means of spreading a knowledge of the Catholic Church the mother of Christian churches and the fountain-head of so much that is good and true in history, art, science, and civilization. The Catholic missionary to whom belongs the honor of having held the first ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the territory now comprising the state of Idaho was the Most Rev. F. N. Blanchet, archbishop of Oregon, who, in 1838, in company of Rev. Modest Demers, was sent...

Discovery Of Gold in Idaho

It is reported that gold was discovered by a French Canadian in Pend d’Oreille river, in 1852. Two years later General Lander found gold while exploring the route for a military road from the Columbia to Fort Bridger. The earliest discoveries of which we have any authentic record, however, were probably made by members of the party with that veteran pioneer and path-finder, Captain John Mullan, the originator of the now famous Mullan road from Fort Benton to Walla Walla, a distance of six hundred and twenty-four miles. In a letter dated Washington, D. C, June 4, 1884, to Mr. A. F. Parker, of Eagle City, he says: I am not at all surprised at the discovery of numerous rich gold deposits in your mountains, because both on the waters of the St. Joseph and the Coeur d’Alene, when there many years ago, I frequently noticed vast masses of quartz strewing the ground, particularly on the St. Joseph river, and wide veins of quartz projecting at numerous points along the line of my road along the Coeur d’Alene, all of which indicated the presence of gold. Nay, more: I now recall quite vividly the fact that one of my herders and hunters, a man by the name of Moise, coming into camp one day with a handful of coarse gold, which he said he found on the waters of the north fork of the Coeur d’Alene while out hunting for our expedition. This was in 1858 or 1859. The members of my expedition were composed very largely of old miners from California, and having had more or less experience...

The Standard Group Of Mineral Claims

The Standard group of claims consists of the following patented lode claims: Standard, Banner, Snow Line, Sancho, Sandwich, Youngstown, Sullivan Fraction, Banner Fraction, Parallel, Little Chap, Mammoth Fraction, a portion of the Mammoth, and Tariff, also the Columbia, Crown Point and Tom Reed, all located in the Coeur d’Alene silver-lead mineral belt, Lalande mining district, Shoshone county, Idaho, one mile from Burke, also the Union Mill-site located at Wallace, Idaho, together with water rights and flumes from which is developed about three hundred horse-power. The Standard claim was located May 7, 1885, by Timothy McCarthy, Timothy Hynes. Frank Hanson and John H. Simmons. All the claims in the Standard group are patented, the patents having issued direct to the Standard Mining Company, with the exception of the Mammoth, Tariff and Mammoth Fraction. These claims are patented, but the patent issued direct to the original owners and was afterward transferred to the Standard Mining Company. The Standard Mining Company is a corporation of Idaho. Its capital stock is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five hundred thousand shares of the par value of one dollar each. The officers of the company are as follows: Amasa B. Campbell, president; John A. Finch, vice-president and treasurer; W. E. Finch, secretary. The stock is held principally by the Finch & Campbell Syndicate of Youngstown, Ohio, Chicago and Milwaukee. The property was purchased by the Standard Company in the spring of 1891, when the development work was commenced. The first ore was struck in the fall of 1892, and since that time it has been a steady shipper and dividend-payer. The property has been...

The Lead Belt Of The Coeur d’Alenes

Lead was first discovered in the Coeur d’Alene mining district, in northern Idaho, on Canyon creek in the fall of 1884, the discovery at that time being the Tiger mine, situated at the town of Burke. During same year a few other locations were made on Canyon creek, a few at Mullan, and in the fall of 1885 the Bunker Hill & Sullivan mines were discovered at Wardner. At the time these discoveries were made the country was inaccessible, with no railroads, wagon roads or trails, and the only way of getting in was by foot; ten to fifteen miles’ travel per day was about all the distance a prospector could cover, owing to the heavy underbrush and timber at that time. The prospector of that day who has not kept posted with the progress of the Coeur d’Alenes would hardly be able to recognize the country at this time. The camp at present may be divided into four districts, viz.: Canyon Creek, Wardner, Mullan and Nine Mile, and standing in the importance of output in the order named. The veins in the Canyon creek district are true fissure veins and as such are likely to go to great depth, some of them having already reached a depth of one thousand feet to one thousand two hundred feet, with no signs of any decrease in quality or quantity of ore. The ore shutes in all the mines on Canyon creek are well defined, regular in width and length and lying between two walls that require but very little prospecting outside the walls or ore-bearing bodies. The slues are much...

The Coeur d’Alene Mining District

This article, as well as that following, concerning the lead belt of the district, is contributed by F. R. Culbertson, under date of July 9. 1898: The Coeur d’Alene mineral belt of northern Idaho, in area about twenty miles square, first came into prominence as a gold-placer camp in the summer and fall of 1883. Placer gold was first discovered on Pritchard creek, near Eagle City, now a deserted camp in Shoshone County. Fabulous reports of the richness and extent of this gold soon spread and attracted the attention of the outside world. In the spring of 1884 there was quite a stampede into the Coeur d’Alene district, being somewhat similar to the present excitement over Klondike. Prospectors for the Coeur d’Alenes from the west outfitted at Spokane and proceeded thence by rail to Rathdrum, by stage to Coeur d’Alene city and from this point on by the old Mullan road (built by the government as a military road) to Evolution, about twenty miles above the Mission; and from this point on by trail to Eagle City. Prospectors from the east left the main line of the Northern Pacific at Herron and Trout Creek and continued from there by trail into the mines. The stories told by the old prospectors of the difficulties of get-ting into the country over these trails remind one of the description and accounts of the Skaguay trail. In the spring of 1884 Eagle City had grown to be a town of two thousand people and became a full-fledged mining camp with all the accessories, including dance halls, gambling houses, restaurants, etc., where the prospector...

Biography of Robert E. McFarland

Robert E. McFarland, late incumbent of the responsible position of attorney general of Idaho, by his faithful and capable discharge of duty won the highest commendation. Thoroughly versed in the principles of jurisprudence, he was well fitted to handle the intricate problems which presented themselves for solution, and his success affords the best evidence of his capabilities. He is a native of Missouri, born in Independence, November 21, 1857. The family is of Scotch lineage, the first American ancestors having crossed the Atlantic in colonial days and actively participated in the events which form the history of that epoch. They also battled for the freedom of the nation in the war of the Revolution. The father of our subject Rev. W. B. McFarland was born in Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Virginia, and later to Missouri. He married Miss Elvira Early, a sister of General Jubal Early, and at the age of sixty-five she departed this life. Rev. W. B. McFarland now resides in Iowa and has attained the advanced age of seven-ty-nine. He has led a long and useful life in the Methodist ministry, and is now practically retired, although he still preaches occasionally. One of a family of nine children, Robert Early McFarland was reared in a cultured home and acquired his education in Central College, at Fayette, Howard county, Missouri. He began reading law in Pettis county, that state, under the instruction of Hon. George G. Vest, now United States senator, and later continued his study in the office and under the direction of George L. Hayes, of Sweet Springs, and Judge John L. Strother, of...

Biography of V. W. Sander

Success is not always the result of fortunate circumstances, but is the outcome of labor and business ability, and the one who achieves success along industrial or commercial lines must be possessed of energy, strong determination and executive force. Such are the qualities which have won for Mr. Sander a leading position among the merchants of Idaho and gained for him the presidency of the Idaho Mercantile Company, Limited, of Coeur d’Alene. A native of Germany, he was born February 4, 1857, and is a son of Henry and Henrietta (Othmer) Sander, also natives of the same country. In 1860 they came with their family to the New World, taking up their residence in Muscatine, Iowa, where the parents died. The subject of this review was only three years of age at the time of the emigration to America. He was reared in Muscatine and acquired his education in the common and high schools of that city, after which he entered upon his business career as a clerk, spending three years as a salesman in the drygoods store of General Gordon, of that city. In 1877 he made his way westward to California, where he was employed as a clerk in a general store for two years, and in 1879 he removed to the territory of Washington, where he secured a ranch, upon which he made his home until the following year. In 1880 he came to what is now the city of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and for several years was associated in business with George B. Wonnacott. In 1883 he began business on his own account, opening a...

Biography of James H. Harte

A well known real-estate and insurance agent of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, is James H. Harte, who was born in Connecticut, near the city of Hartford. July 25, 1854, his parents being Walter and Elizabeth (Gibson) Harte, both of whom were natives of Connecticut, in which state the father died when about fifty-five years of age, while the mother still makes her home there. Mr. Harte of this review pursued his education in the public schools of Plainville, and Hartford. Connecticut. He then entered upon his business career as a clerk in a drygoods store in Hartford, where he remained for four years, after which he conducted operations along the same line until 1878. He then enlisted in the regular army as a member of Company C, Second United States Infantry, and after serving for five years was honorably discharged, November 8, 1883, at Fort Spokane, having in the meantime attained the rank of first sergeant. After leaving the army Mr. Harte served for three years as bookkeeper for the post trader at Fort Spokane and then came to Coeur d’Alene, in the winter of 1886. For one year he was engaged in general merchandising in this town, and since the spring of 1888 has been engaged in the real estate and insurance business. In 1885 was celebrated his marriage to Miss Amelia R. Brooks, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and they have one child, Margaret. In his political affiliations Mr. Harte is a Republican and keeps well informed on the issues of the day, thus being qualified to give an intelligent support to the party of his choice. He...

Biography of John B. Goode

The readjustment of the national affairs after the civil war led to conditions under which the people of the north and the people of the south began to mingle, and became acquainted and ratified the feeling of mutual admiration which their prowess during the four years’ struggle had compelled for foemen who wore the gray and foemen who wore the blue. Men of the north took part in the southern business and politics; men of the south began to have a hand in the national and local affairs at the north. A paternal sentiment has resulted which has buried old animosities and raised numerous mutual interests, and today east, west, south, southwest and northwest, southern men and northern men are working hand in hand for the greater prosperity and the gradual but certain attainment of the splendid destiny of the American people. Idaho is not without its prominent men of southern birth and education, and one of the most highly regarded of these is John B. Goode, of Coeur d’Alene. John B. Goode was born in Bedford county, Virginia, August 18, 1864, a son of John Goode, long one of the most prominent men in the Old Dominion, and conspicuous in national politics since the days before the war. This distinguished son of Virginia was born in May 1829, and became an able and successful lawyer and a factor in the state affairs. A Democrat of Democrats and a patriotic lover of the south and all its institutions, he early identified himself with the public questions which were engaging the best talent of the country previous to the war...

Carlson, Mardella Lee – Obituary

Summerville, Oregon Mardella Lee Carlson, 56, of Coeur d’Alene and formerly of Summerville and La Grande, died Oct. 28 at Kootenai Medical Center. A memorial service is planned for Friday at 1 p.m. at the La Grande Nazarene Church. Daniels Chapel of the Valley is in charge of arrangements. Miss Carlson was born Feb. 8, 1950, in La Grande to Dale L. and Valera L. Robinette Carlson of Summerville. She grew up on the family farm and was active in local 4-H clubs and in Girl Scouts. As a child she loved picking huckleberries in the nearby mountains with her family. She attended elementary school in Imbler, and her remaining education was at La Grande in a special education curriculum. She graduated with a modified diploma from La Grande High School in 1969 and proudly marched with the class at graduation. After high school she lived with her grandmother, Lola Robinette, and worked as a dishwasher at the Royal Cafe in downtown La Grande. In 1971 she moved to a private group home in Boise, and during the rest of her life, she lived in group homes in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In 1996 it was discovered that she had an inoperable brain tumor that had been the cause of her special needs at birth and throughout her life. While she was able, she always came home for holidays, especially Christmas. She was always talking about her family, and they made trips to visit her as often as they could. Survivors include her mother, Valera L. Carlson of Island City; siblings and their spouses, Lawrence “Larry” D. Carlson of...
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