Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Coal County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of theseĀ Coal County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Archives Byrd’s Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Globe Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Pine Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Byrds Prairie Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Lonestar Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Moore Cemetery Ninas Cemetery Nixon Cemetery Panther Creek Cemetery Plesant Grove Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Woodman Cemetery Hosted at Coal County Oklahoma ALHN Boiling Springs Cemetery Byrds Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery Calvary Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Cofer Cemetery Davis Cemetery Globe Cemetery Hearrell Cemetery Keel Cemetery Kennedy Cemetery Knight Cemetery Legal Cemetery Lehigh Cemetery Lone Star Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Medicine Springs Cemetery Midway Cemetery Moore Cemetery A-C Names D-H Names I-O Names P-Z Names Nixon Cemetery Nolen Cemetery Oconee Cemetery Ott Family Cemetery Palmer Family Cemetery Pine Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Riley Cemetery Round Lake Cemetery Salt Creek Cemetery Sealey Chapel Cemetery Silas James Cemetery Ward Family Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Woodman Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries Andy Riley Memorial Cemetery Byrds Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Clarita Amish Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Finley Cemetery Lehigh Cemetery Lone Star Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Midway Cemetery Moore Cemetery Nixon Cemetery Pine Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Round Lake Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Woodman Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Gravestones Project Byrd’s Prairie Cemetery Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Cemetery Search: Oklahoma, Find A Grave Index Search: Billion Graves for Cemeteries inĀ Coal County...

Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home. I’ve heard the soldiers sing that song a heap of times. They sung it kind of lonesome like and I guess it sort of made them home sick to sing it. Us niggers learned to sing it and it is about the only one I can sing yet. I remembers the words to another one we used to sing but I’ve forgot the tune but the words go like this: Old man, old man Your hair is getting gray, I’d foller you ten thousand miles To hear your banjo play. I never was much at singing though. I guess my voice is just about wore out just like my body. I’ve always had good health and I never had a doctor in my life. In the last three or four years I’ve had some pains from rheumatism. I think all our sickness is brought on by the kidneys and I made my own kidney medicine and allus stayed well. I used to get a weed called hoarhound, it grows...

Biographical Sketch of William Kelly Morgan

William Kelly Morgan, engaged in the monument business in Muskogee, was born in Independence county, Arkansas, on the 2d of September, 1874. Having completed his public school education he devoted his attention to farming until 1908, manifesting at all times that spirit of industry which has characterized him in his later commercial pursuits. He brought his land under a high state of cultivation and carried on the work of the farm until 1908, when he became engaged in general merchandising at Colegate, Oklahoma, where he remained for two and a half years. On the expiration of that period he turned his attention to the marble and granite business as a monument maker and in 1919 he came to Muskogee, where he has since carried on business under his own name, having his establishment at No. 217 South Cherokee street. Here he employs four men and is enjoying a good patronage, which is steadily growing by reason of the value and attractiveness of the work turned out. He has been the maker of some of the finest monuments seen in this section and his business is steadily growing. In 1901 Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss Stella Plummer, a granddaughter of Joseph R. Plummer, whose quarter strain of Indian blood makes him a prominent representative of the Choctaw Nation. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have an interesting family of six children: Reginald, Beatrice, William K., Jr., Gilmer, Lorene and Woodrow Wilson. The parents are members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Morgan is serving on the board of stewards. They take an active interest in the...

Pin It on Pinterest