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Biography of Jesse M. Foster

Jesse M. Foster, a native Kansan, had been a practical newspaper man since leaving college. He is now proprietor and publisher of the Clifton News, one of the oldest papers in continuous publication in Washington County. This paper was established in December, 1885, by J. M. and J. C. Padgett. It was first known as the Local News. It was changed to the Clifton News in 1891 by L. A. Palmer, then the publisher. The successive owners and publishers were I. C. Ware, one year, A. Q. Miller, two years, N. F. Hewitt, Stoy E. Ware, Burt Fraser, P. M. Harmon, Best & Murdoek, later Best alone, and from him Mr. Foster bought the plant. The paper is published at the corner of Willow and Parallel streets. It is a republican paper and had a circulation over Clay, Washington and surrounding counties. Mr. Foster was born at Clifton, Kansas, February 26, 1888. He is of old American stock. The Fosters came from England to Pennsylvania in colonial times and some of the family served in the Revolutionary war. The grandfather, John W. Foster, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1798, married a woman whose ancestors came from Saxony, Germany, to Pennsylvania. John W. Foster was one of the early settlers in that historle City of Galena, Hlinois, the home of General Grant before the war. He went from there to California in the days of ’49 and spent three years as a successful prospector and miner, accumulating a handsome fortune of $200,000 in gold. After returning to the States he became a merchant at St. Paul, Minnesota, but finally...

Biography of De Witt C. Tyler, M. D.

De Witt C. Tyler, M. D. Though he is now retiring from the work which had engaged his attention for so many years Doctor Tyler is properly credited with being the oldest physician and surgeon of Clifton, where he began practice thirty-six years ago. By intense devotion to his work Doctor Tyler long enjoyed a splendid practice in Clay and Washington counties, and though much of his service had gone unremunerated he had exercised fine business ability and owned a large amount of property in this section of the state. Doctor Tyler was born at Roscoe, Illinois, March 13, 1850, and largely educated himself by earning the means necessary for his higher education. He is of old American and New England stock. His great-grand-father and also his grandfather, Asa Tyler, were natives of Vermont. Asa was born in that colony in 1777, served with credit in the War of 1812 and became a pioneer farmer in Illinois. He died at Monroe in Ogle County, Illinois, in 1873. He married Fannie Tupper, who also died at Monroe. Freeman Tyler, father of Doctor Tyler, was born in New York State in 1819. In 1832, when he was thirteen years of age, his parents removed to Ohio, locating east of Cleveland, where he grew up and married. He was a cooper by trade, and in 1840 went to Belvidere, Illinois, where he followed his chosen work, located at Roscoe in 1841, in 1854 established a cooperage shop in Beloit, Wisconsin, following that he engaged in farming in Ogle County, Illinois, and from there in 1867 moved to Sycamore, Illinois, where he continued...

Biography of Horace E. Potter, M. D.

Horace E. Potter, M. D., had been located at Clifton for over thirty years, and besides his successful associations with the profession is a man of high standing and wide repute for his active relations with community affairs. Doctor Potter came to Kansas on his graduation from medical college. He was born in Henry County, Illinois, December 25, 1858. His ancestry is Scotch and his forefathers came from Scotland to Connecticut in colonial times. His father, Loren E. Potter, was also a physician. He was born at Potter’s Corners near Buffalo in Erie County, New York, in 1822. When he was twelve years of age his parents moved from Erie County to the Ohio Western Reserve and he grew up and married in Northeastern Ohio. Three of his children were born near Ashtabula. While in Ohio he studied medicine with Dr. Horace Eton, beginning practice in that state, moving from there to Henry County, Illinois, and soon after the Civil war moving to Marshall County, Iowa, where he practiced thirty years. During part of this time he had his home on a farm, but the last fifteen years of his life were spent at Algona, Iowa, where he died in December, 1897. As was true of most of the good Americans living in the Western Reserve, he was strongly identified with the abolotionist cause before the war and subsequently was an equally ardent republican. His church was the Presbyterian. Dr. L. E. Potter married Thankful Rickard. She was born near Ashtabula, Ohio, in 1822 and died at Algona, Iowa, in 1902. Of their four living children Horace E. is...

Biography of Arthur H. Bennett

Arthur H. Bennett. Few men have contributed more practical encouragement to grain and stock raisers in Kansas than has Arthur H. Bennett, of Topeka, president of the Bennett Commission Company, whose business has been one of the chief commercial factors in its line in the city during the past decade. He was born May 9, 1869, on what was known as the “Old Thompson Farm,” located near Marengo, McHenry County, Illinois, the only son of Fayette Henry and Mary Eliza (Merriman) Bennett. The Bennett family is of Puritan stock, the progenitors of the family having come to America on the Mayflower. Fayette Henry Bennett was born July 4, 1838, in Chautauqua County, New York, the eldest son of Ashley C. and Charlotte S. (Wheeler) Bennett, grandson of Zebulon and Sarah (Cooper) Bennett and great-grandson of Zebulon Bennett. Fayette H. Bennett served for a time as a soldier in the Civil war, being a member of Company A, Ninety-fifth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and at the close of the war returned to Illinois and resumed his agricultural operations. He remained in that state until 1878, when he removed with his family to Kansas, settling at Clifton, Clay County, but in his declining years took up his residence at Topeka, where his death occurred July 12, 1910. Mr. Bennett was a devout Methodist in religion, and a strong temperance man, being active in the movements which eventuated in making Kansas a prohibition state. His religion was a part of his nature, inherited, no doubt, from his Puritan forbears. Prior to his death he had, at his own expense, supported a native...

Biography of Elmore W. Snyder

Elmore W. Snyder. A resident of Kansas since 1878, and with possibly one exception the oldest living bank president in the state, Elmore W. Snyder, president of the Manufacturers National Bank of Leavenworth, had been actively identified with the commercial and financial history of Kansas for nearly forty years. He was born in the Village of Red Creek, Wayne County, New York, November 23, 1850. Jacob Snyder, his great-grandfather, settled in that section of York State in pioneer times and operated a grist mill for many years. His grandfather, Amos Snyder, was there reared, engaged in farming, practiced law and served as judge of Wayne County. James W. Snyder, father of Elmore W. Snyder, was born and reared in Wayne County, New York. He achieved prominence during the Civil war by recruiting Company A, Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, of which he was elected captain, and after serving two and one-half years was honorably discharged as colonel of his regiment. Colonel Snyder followed farming and grain buying principally during his active career, and when Oklahoma lands were thrown open for white settlement, joined the rush, although then well advanced in years, and succeeded in securing a claim where now stands the City of Guthrie. He took an active part in the early history of that city and for a period served as city treasurer. In his later life he moved to Wichita, Kansas, where he lived, honored and respected, until his death, in October, 1914. To his marriage with Sarah A. O’Neill, four children were born, of whom there are two now living: Chester, of Topeka; and Elmore W.,...

Biography of John W. Roberts

John W. Roberts, educator, superintendent of the city schools at Sedan, had attained prominence in educational circles in Southeastern Kansas, and though a native of the City of Topeka he represents one of the oldest and most noted families of Oskaloosa. Both his grandfather and father were men of distinction in the newspaper profession and his grandfather edited one of the early free state papers of Kansas. The family of which he is a member originated in England, and there were four of the Roberts brothers who came to America in Colonial times, one of them settling in New York, another in New Jersey and the two others elsewhere. John W. Roberts, grandfather of Professor Roberts, was born at Waynesville, Ohio, in 1822. He was reared on a farm near that town, was married there, and early got into the newspaper business. He organized the company that established a paper at Waynesville and also published a magazine. He was strongly abolitionist, and seeing an opportunity for being of greater influence to that movement he sent the printing press and other materials out to Oskaloosa, Kansas, in 1860, and his brother-in-law, J. W. Day, established there the old Oskaloosa Independent, the first copy of which was issued in July, 1860. John W. Roberts himself came out to Kansas in 1862, and was editor of the Independent until he retired at the age of seventy, though he was in close touch with its management and a contributor to its columns until the time of his death. He died at Oskaloosa in October, 1900. Besides his work as an editor he was...

Biography Of John H. Miller

John H. Miller. In a study of conditions which have combined for the advancement of men of prominence in the business world, the student invariably finds that those upon whom rests dependence for counsel, advice and leadership are those who have won their way to the forefront through the force of their own industry and application, rising gradually and fighting their way in the face of all opposition. The traits of character which may be depended upon for the greatest rewards are industry, integrity, self-reliance and perseverance, and to these may be attributed the success that had crowned the efforts of John H. Miller, president of the Miller Refining Petroleum Company, of Chanute. Mr. Miller had been the architect of his own fortunes and occupies an enviable position in business and financial circles, not alone on account of the success that he had achieved, but also on account of the honorable, straightforward business policy which he had ever followed. Mr. Miller was born in Shelby County, Missouri, February 1, 1857, and is a son of John L. Miller. His father was born in 1822, in Scotland, and came to the United States when about twenty-one years of age, first locating in New York City, where for several years he worked as foreman in a shoe factory. He was married in New York, where four of his children were born, and then removed to Shelby County, Missouri, and settled on a farm, being engaged in agricultural operations for some years. Later he turned his attention to the livestock and grain business, and in 1879 came to Kansas and settled at...

Biography of Hon. Sol. A. Bardwell

Hon. Sol. A. Bardwell. Not so often, as in the election and re-election of Hon. Sol. A. Bardwell, has the public choice fallen upon so able and scholarly a man, one so admirably qualified for high public service. For many years Mr. Bardwell was widely known in the educational field, and still later in business circles, his entire training from boyhood leading along lines that develop mental strength and stable character. Accustomed to leadership and responsibility, he entered upon the duties of a legislator with intelligent vision as well as firmness of purpose. Being a careful student, a ready speaker and naturally aggressive, he became a strong number from the first and aided in bringing about much enlightened and constructive legislation. He was born in Atchison County, Kansas, March 6, 1870, and is one of a family of six children born to Milner and Mary (Washer) Bardwell. Milner Bardwell was born in Massachusetts and came of an old and highly respected family of New England. His father was a Presbyterian minister who was a missionary among the Indians in Mississippi prior to the Civil war, a short time before which he had removed to Indiana. Milner Bardwell was then a young man and in Indiana he was married to Miss Mary Washer, a native of that state. In 1861 Milner Bardwell enlisted in an Indiana regiment for service in the Civil war, in which he was a faithful soldier for three years. Sickness then overcame him and he was sent home but never recovered sufficiently to rejoin his regiment, from which he received an honorable discharge. In 1868 he...

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