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Biography of Bethina Angelina Owens-Adair

MRS. DR. OWENS-ADAIR. – Berthina Angelina, the second daughter of Thomas and Sarah Owens, was born February 7,1840, in Van Buren county, Missouri. She saw her fourth birthday in her father’s Western home on Clatsop Plains, Clatsop county, Oregon, her parents having made the then dangerous and tedious journey across the then dangerous and tedious journey across the plains with ox-teams in the summer and fall of 1843. At this time Berthina was a small child, delicate in stature for her age, and having a highly nervous and sensitive nature, but with a strong, vigorous constitution, thus early showing a good physical foundation for great perseverance and endurance. The country reached by her parents was new to them, and virtually unoccupied, save by Indians. It was a wilderness unbroken by the means and appliances of our civilization, with no visible evidence of its immediate settlement and development. If it were a nice thing to do for these elder people to leave their old established homes, social relations and open markets, thousands of miles away, and come into this new land, from which they could not return, their experience at the end of the journey taught them that they had retraced their steps in their lives to what appeared to be a childish adventure, and to a place where a child might lead them. This young girl was now as old as were her parents in all of their new surroundings. And we offer this beautiful thought here, that seems like a mirror, as it were; for it reflected the impression of the future of this household: “The gloomiest day...

Biography of Mrs. Harriet Jewett

MRS. HARRIET JEWETT.- A mournful personal as well as historic interest lingers about those who survived the dreadful affair at Waiilatpu in 1847. Many of these feel that those who died were the happier; and no sympathetic friend, as every reader of this book must be, will care to inquire more minutely than is given in the pages of the general history of this work. But all will be glad that these sufferers from Indian atrocity outlived their great sorrow, – the butchering of a husband or father or friend, – and have for all these years been useful and contented citizens. Mrs. Jewett was born in Lower Canada in 1809, and at the age of twenty moved with her parents to the United States, where she was soon married to Nathan Kimball. The young couple removed to Indiana, and in 1847 joined a company bound for Oregon. Mr. Kimball was ambitious, a good mechanic, and had considerable money. Purchasing an excellent outfit, two ox-teams, milk cows, and clothing for two years, the journey was undertaken with high hopes and good cheer. What extra money was on hand was sewed up in belts, and worn by the older members of the family. On the journey misfortune overtook the family (there were seven children) in the death of a girl of three and a boy of fourteen. On no place than the plains is death more gloomy. The loved ones must be buried and left. The graves must be guarded against the prowling of wolves on the scent of blood, and of Indians ready to rifle even the dead of...

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