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North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Slave Narrative of Allen V. Manning

Person Interviewed: Allen V. Manning Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Clarke County Mississippi Date of Birth: 1850 Age: 87 Occupation: Sells Milk I always been somewhar in the South, mostly in Texas when I was a young man, and of course us Negroes never got much of a show in court matters, but I reckon if I had of had the chance to set on a jury I would of made a mighty poor out at it. No sir. I jest can’t set in judgement on nobody, ’cause I learned when I was jest a little boy that good people and bad people, makes no difference which, jest keep on living and doing like they been taught, and I jest can’t seen to blame them none for what they do iffen they been taught that way. I was born in slavery, and I belonged to a Baptist preacher. Until I was fifteen years old I was taught that I was his own chattel-property, and he could do with me like he wanted to, but he had been taught that way too, and we both believed it. I never did hold nothing against him for being hard on Negroes sometimes, and I don’t think I ever would of had any trouble even if I had of growed up and died in slavery. The young Negroes don’t know nothing ’bout that today, and lots of them are rising up and amounting to something, and all us Negroes is proud of them. You see, it’s because they been taught that they got as good a show to be something as anybody,...

Biography of David G. Parker, D. D. S.

David G. Parker, D. D. S., a popular dentist of Riverside and well known in professional circles of that city, is a native of Alabama, where he was born in 1850, his parents being Peter and Nancy (Blackshear) Parker; the former a Northern man by birth, a descendant of the old colonial families of Massachusetts, by occupation a planter; the latter of German descent, the arrival of whose forefathers in this country antedates the Revolutionary period. When the Doctor was a mere lad his parents moved to Mississippi, settling in Clarke County, where he received his education, closing his studies at the Marshall College in Marshall, Texas, at the age of eighteen years. He then learned telegraphing and accepted the position of telegrapher and station master on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad at De Soto, Mississippi, where he remained for several years; during his spare time he educated himself and devoted much attention to the study of dentistry. He is possessed of untiring energy and perseverance, characteristic of, and undoubtedly inherited from, his New England ancestry; and, being determined to educate himself in a profession that he had chosen as a life occupation, he sought the schools of the North, and in 1880 went to Indiana and entered the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis. He graduated with honor from that institution in 1882 and received his diploma as Doctor of Dental Surgery. He then established himself in the practice of his profession at Opelousas, Louisiana, where he remained until 1887. His failing health prompted him to seek his home in a more desirable climate: accordingly he came to California...

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