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Biography of Frank Mason

Frank Mason, President of the Title Abstract Company of Nowata, in which connection he has established for the company a well merited reputation for accuracy, progressiveness and re-liability, was born in Monroe County, Ohio, January 18, 1861, and is a son of Dr. George W. and Janet (Park) Mason, both of whom were natives of Ohio, the former of Irish descent, while the latter was of Scotch lineage. Their respective families settled in Ohio as pioneers of Monroe County and became identified with the early development and progress of that state. The early home of the Mason family was a log cabin that in later years was replaced by a more modern and attractive residence but the pioneer home still stands as a monument to the labors and spirit of that early generation of the family which was so closely associated with the period of primitive development in the Buckeye state. In the family of Dr. George W. and Janet (Park) Mason there were five sons. Frank Mason, who was the third in order of birth, was reared on his father’s farm, aiding in the task of clearing and developing the land while his educational opportunities were those affored by the public schools of the neighborhood. He was a young man of twenty-two years when he became a candidate for the office of registrar of deeds in Monroe County. Something of his popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen is indicated in the fact that he easily won over sixteen other candidates. Later he was reelected to the office and continued to fill the position...

Biographical Sketch of Theodore Gardner

Theodore Gardner, now a resident of Lawrence, is one of the interesting survivors of the border and civil warfare period of Kansas. He is a son of that Kansas pioneer and patriot, Joseph Gardner, whose picture now hangs on the walls of the Memorial Building at Topeka. Theodore Gardner had furnished a graphic sketch of his father, published on other pages. Theodore Gardner was born November 13, 1844, came to Kansas in 1857, and at the age of twelve had finished his education in a backwoods school. From the time he came to Kansas he had constant training in the strenuous and dangerous duties of real life, and for many years was striving to keep the gaunt gray wolves from the door of his home. On June 6, 1862, he enlisted in the First Kansas Battery, and had since become the historian of that battery’s services. He was with it until discharged June 6, 1865, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, by reason of expiration of his term of service. His wife, Wilhelmina Selig, was born at Hamburg, Germany, in 1851. Two children were born to them: Wilbur L., born December 12, 1873, and May E., born November 8,...

Chickamauga Tribe

Chickamauga Indians (Tsǐkăma’gi, a word apparently of foreign origin and probably Shawnee, Creek, or Chickasaw). The name given to a band of Cherokee who espoused the English cause in the war of the Revolution and moved far down on Tennessee River, establishing new settlements on Chickamauga Creek, in the neighborhood of the present Chattanooga. Under this name they soon became noted for their uncompromising and never ceasing hostility. In 1782 their towns were destroyed by Sevier and Campbell, and they moved farther down the river, establishing what were afterward known as the “five lower towns,” Running Water, Nickajack, Long Island, Crow Town, and Lookout Mountain Town. Here they were continually recruited by Creeks, Shawnee, and white Tories, until they were estimated to number a thousand warriors. They continued hostilities against the Tennessee settlements until 1794, when their towns were...

Biographical Sketch of William Henderson

William Henderson, blacksmith, Oakland; born in Gurnsey Co., Ohio, Sept 25, 1831, where he learned and worked at the blacksmith trade until the fall of 1858, When he emigrated West and located in Lawrence Co., Ill., where he followed his trade until 1862, when he enlisted as a private in the 60th I. V. I., and went forward to battle for the Union; he served with his regiment one year, when he was detailed as blacksmith in the Quartermaster’s Department at Chattanooga, Tenn., where he remained until the fall of 1865, when he returned and worked at his trade at Marion, Ill., and Terre Haute, Ind., until August, 1866, when he located in Charleston and worked at his trade until June, 1872, when he removed to Oakland, where he has since lived. He is President of the National Christian Temperance Union, and is held in high esteem for the noble stand he has taken in the cause of temperance; he was elected Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Oakland at the last municipal election, which office he now holds. His marriage with Ellen Eaglan was celebrated March 27, 1871; she was born in Virginia June 2, 1835; they have four children now living by this union, viz., Francis, John, Edward and...
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