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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of Calvin Ford

Calvin Ford came from Ireland, and settled in Charlotte County, Virginia, where his son Hezekiah was born. The latter married Ann Garrett, by whom he had thirteen children, eleven of whom he raised. Their names were Calvin, James, Claiborne, Laban, Marley, Thomas, William, Elizabeth, Morning, Susan, and Martha. William, James, Elizabeth and Martha came to Montgomery County with their mother, who was a widow, in 1835. William was married first to Martha A. Eperson, of Virginia, and after her death he married Margaret H. Nettle. James was married first to Mary Robinson, and after her death he married the widow Natton. Elizabeth married John Buster, of Virginia, who settled in Montgomery County in 1835. Martha married Simeon Hovey, of Virginia, and after his death she was married the second time to Andrew Britt, of...

Biographical Sketch of Andrew B. Paris

Andrew B. Paris, attorney, San Bernardino, was born in Virginia, in 1839, and was educated in the Virginia Military Institute, at which he was graduated in 1860. Upon the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the Confederate army, served four years, rose to the rank of Colonel, and at the close of hostilities was chief of artillery of General Hoke’s division of General Joseph E. Johnston’s army. After the war closed he studied law in the University of Virginia, and was admitted to the bar in 1866. Locating in Charlotte County, Virginia, he practiced his profession till 1873. In 1874 he came to California and settled in San Bernardino, and has been actively and prominently connected with the bar of the county ever since. Colonel Paris has been associated as a law partner with Henry Goodcell and Judge John L. Campbell respectively, and now has as partner Dwight W. Fox, a promising young attorney. Colonel Paris’s special strength at the bar lies in the trial of criminal causes, in which he is very successful, being one of the ablest advocates in this part of the State. He has been connected on one side or the other with many of the most celebrated criminal cases before the courts of this county. In 1886 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of San Bernardino County for two years, and was recognized as one of the most efficient prosecutors who has ever filled that office. As a local orator Colonel Paris is very popular, and his services are usually in demand on all occasions where terse, pithy speeches are in order. On...

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