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Biographical Sketch of William George Ebersole

Ebersole, William George; dentist; M. D. and D. D. S.; born, Carrollton, O., Nov. 18, 1864; son of John E. and Nancy Lyons Ebersole; educated, Grammar and High School of Carrollton; Ohio Norman University at Ada O.; spent a year and a half in the study of law; Western Reserve University, both medical and dental courses; married, Dec. 17, 1890, Carrollton, O., Miss Ora Stemple; one son, Carl Haman, born Oct. 19, 1896; in October, 1898, began the practise of dentistry in Cleveland; two and one-half years demonstrator of operative dentistry at Western Reserve University; 1898-1899 and a part of 1900, lecturer on Oral Surgery at Western Reserve University; paramount interest, development of humanitarian dentistry; prominent in introducing into the public schools a system of dental inspection and educational lectures; member the Cleveland Dental Society, The Academy of Medicine, Northern Ohio Dental Ass’n, National Ass’n and The Ohio State Dental Ass’n; member Chamber of Commerce; Colonial Club; Republican; member Windimere Presbyterian...

Biographical Sketch of John Henry Lotz

Lotz, John Henry; head worker Alta Social Settlement House; born, Carrollton, O., Dec. 2, 1872; son of Daniel S. and Ella Hill Lotz; educated, Mt. Hemron Boy’s School, 1894; Williams College, 1898; Union Theological Seminary, 1904; post-graduate study, Columbia University; married, Middlebury, Conn., Aug. 17, 1904; May Louise Waters; one son; taught St. Paul’s School, Garden City, L. I., 1898-1901; director Bethany Memorial Boy’s Club, New York City, 1901-1904; since 1904 head of Alta House Settlement; member Grargoyle, Williams College, Chamber of Commerce, and City Club, Cleveland. Recreation:...

Biography of Joseph Kennedy Hudson, General

Gen. Joseph Kennedy Hudson. One of the ablest soldiers of Kansas and most determined fighter for the free-state movement, the late General Hudson will have a lasting fame not only for what he did in the trying years of Kansas’ youth, but also as founder and for many years editor of the Topeka Capital. It was his resourcefulness as a practical newspaper man and his wonderful ability as an editor and molder of public opinion that gave the Capital its wide influence and standing as a journal, and the history of the Kansas Press had no more notable figure than Joseph Kennedy Hudson. It is not the purpose of this article to describe in detail the history of the Topeka Capital. That belongs to other pages. But something should be said of General Hudson’s personal relations with that journal and also of his ability and personality as an editor. It was in 1873 that he purchased the Kansas Farmer and moved it from Leavenworth to Topeka. He continued to edit and publish this paper until 1879. In March of the latter year he began the publication of the Topeka Daily Capital, now owned by Governor Capper. To the task of making a metropolitan daily paper with at least a state wide influence, General Hudson brought keen foresight, rare judgment, magnificent courage and a fund of energy and endurance that was a marvel to his associates. In a few years he had made the support of the Capital almost indispensable to any general movement in state politics or affairs, and he also elevated it to the position of one of...

Biography of Hon. Thomas Patton

HON. THOMAS PATTON. – There is scarcely a man in Oregon, who enjoys a greater measure of esteem, both in his own community and abroad, than the gentleman whose name heads this memoir. With the usual substantial and popular qualities of the pioneers, he has a touch of dash and a breadth of view which lift him somewhat above the horizon of even the first business men and thinkers of the Pacific Northwest. He is prominent among those who have given the tone and pose to the peculiarly refined and genial society of the Capital city. He was born in Carrollton, Ohio, March 19, 1829, and in 1838 moved with his parents to Findlay. His education was secured at Martinsburg Academy, and at the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware. He chose the law as his profession, and after the usual preparation passed a very satisfactory examination, being admitted to the bar in 1850. The very flattering reports, which returning parties from Oregon had circulated relative to that territory, reaching his ears, he determined to come West, and in 1851 joined a party of emigrants at Council Bluffs, arriving at his destination in October of that year. In that company he first saw the lady, then a girl of fourteen years, who afterwards became his wife. He first settled on Yamhill county, where he remained until December, when he located at Salem. In the spring of 1853 he removed to Jackson county, and was shortly afterwards elected county judge. During the Indian war of 1855-56 he served as orderly sergeant in Company A, commanded by Captain John F. Miller. On August...

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