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Biography of A. C. Campbell

A.C. CAMPBELL. – The respect Mr. Campbell commands in his community as a man of honesty and integrity, and as one who has acquired a very enviable competency by hard knocks and straightforward dealings, reminds one of Longfellow’s famous blacksmith; but, although Mr. Campbell has for years upon years listened to the “measured beat and slow’ of his hammer on the anvil, he no longer appears with leathern apron and bare, brown arms, because he is now settled down in a comfortable home, and in the midst of his loving family living happily by other and less arduous pursuits than blacksmithing. He an contemplate with pleasure the means which he has accomplished by industry and determination. He is one of the pioneers of the county, and as such should not be passed over with a mere casual mention. If there is any one class of men more than another entitled to the admiration of everyone, it is that known as the “early pioneers.” They were men possessed of more character, hardihoood and genuine bravery than any other class of men living, and possessed a versatility which seemed to fit them particularly for the life of a pioneer, – to subdue and have dominion. It by no means follows that all men who came to the coast in “early days” were pioneers of this stamp. “Those were the times that tried men’s souls;” and only the ones possessed of an adaminatine spirit were successful and prosperous. Every man’s nerve was put to the test, – his honor tried, his spirit of determination proved and only the ones who came through...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel George

SAMUEL GEORGE. – Mr. George was born in England in 1835, and in 1858 went to Australia, and in 1861 to New Zealand. From this antipodal region he came to British Columbia and mined for years at Caribou. In 1867 he brought his wanderings to a close by selecting a home in Umatilla county, Oregon, where he engaged in cattle raising on Butter creek in company with James Webb. They were partners for two years. Since their separation, he has conducted the business alone to the present time, keeping an average of about five hundred cattle on the range. Grass having become scant has necessitated his securing a considerable body of land. He now has seven hundred cattle and a hundred and thirty-five horses. This number he has maintained, notwithstanding material losses by hard winters, thieves and estraying. Mr. George is recognized as one of the substantial and hospitable citizens of this independent section, and is held in high esteem by the many who know...

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