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Slave Narrative of Fannie Alexander

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Fannie Alexander Location: Helena, Arkansas Age: 62 Occupation: Teacher “I was an orphant child. My mother-in-law told me during slavery she was a field hand. One day the overseer was going to whoop one of the women ’bout sompin or other and all the women started with the hoes to him and run him clear out of the field. They would killed him if he hadn’t got out of the way. She said the master hadn’t put a overseer over them for a long time. Some of ’em wouldn’t do their part and he put one of the men on the place over the women. He was a colored foreman. The women worked together and the men worked together in different fields. My mother-in-law was named Alice Drummond. She said they would cut the hoecakes in half and put that in your pan, then pour the beef stew on top. She said on Christmas day they had hot biscuits. They give them flour and things to make biscuit at home on Sundays. When they got through eating they take their plate and say, ‘Thank God for what I received.’ She said they had plenty milk. The churns was up high—five gallon churns. Some churns was cedar wood. The children would churn standing on a little stool. It would take two to churn. They would change about and one brushed away the flies. She lived close to Meridian and Canton. “My mother talked the bright side to her children. She was born in Tennessee. She had two older sisters sold from her. She never...

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