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Biography of James W. Ballantine

One of the foremost representatives of the mercantile interests of the Wood river valley is James W. Ballantine, of Bellevue. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born February 15, 1839, and in his life has manifested many of the sterling traits of his Scotch ancestry, who emigrated to the United States in 1825. His parents were Nathaniel and Sarah (Wallace) Ballantine, natives of Scotland, in which country they were reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic to America, they took up their residence near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, where the father engaged in merchandising. They were Presbyterians in their religious faith, and were people of the highest integrity of character, respected by all who knew them. For more than forty years Nathaniel Ballantine was a successful business man of Pennsylvania, and lived to be seventy-eight years of age, while his wife passed away at the age of seventy. They had eight children, four of whom are living. James W. Ballantine is the eldest living of their sons. He was educated in the public schools of his native state, and received his business training at the store and under the direction of his father, whom he assisted in the conduct of a mercantile establishment until President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers to aid in suppressing the rebellion in the south. Mr. Ballantine at once responded, enlisting in April 1861, and assisted in raising Company E, of the Ninth Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, of which he was elected first lieutenant. He was afterward chosen captain of Company K, of the same regiment in which position he served until the expiration of his term....

Biographical Sketch of Frank Adgate Quail

Quail, Frank Adgate; Henderson, Quail & Siddall; lawyers; born, Canonsburg, Pa., June 18, 1865; educated, public schools, and graduated Washburn College, Topeka, Kas., 1887, degree A. B.; University of Michigan, 1889, degree LL. B.; began practice in Cleveland the same year; January, 1895, entered the firm of Henderson & Quail; firm changed to Henderson, Quail & Siddall, in 1904, G. B. Siddall being added; director in a number of corporations doing business in Northern Ohio; member Union, Euclid, University, and Colonial Clubs, and Chamber of Commerce;...

Biography of William B. Sutton

William B. Sutton. Since he came to Kansas in 1887, as a rancher-lawyer, William B. Sutton has found all the opportunities that an ambitious man could crave for an active, earnest, useful and prosperous career. For many years he has lived in Kansas City, Kansas, and is one of the leading lawyers of that city. He was born in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1849, the seventh in a family of ten children born to James and Sarah (Stanborough) Sutton. His father was born in the same county of Pennsylvania in 1812, and died in 1870, while the mother was born in Pittsburg and died in 1899 at the age of eighty-four. James Sutton was a merchant, a paper manufacturer, a private banker, and at the time of his death was president of the First National Bank of Indiana, Pennsylvania. William B. Sutton was educated at Tuscarora Academy in Juniata County, the Elders Ridge Academy in Indiana County, and in 1868 graduated from Washington and Jefferson College at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The time of his graduation was distinguished by another important event of his life. June 8, 1868, he married Miss Agnes Black, who was born in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of John E. and Alice (Hanson) Black. Her father was a banker at Canonsburg and also treasurer of Washington and Jefferson College. For the next two years Mr. Sutton studied law with Judge Blair in his native town of Indiana, and on April 20, 1870, was admitted to the bar in the Fifth Judicial District in the State of New York. He then engaged in active practice at Utica, New...

Biography of Dr. N. G. Blalock

DR. N.G. BLALOCK. – Americans in general and those of the West in particular have no equals in the world in versatility. No other people can do so many different things and do them so well as we. No other people so disregard the conventional and regular ways of doing things, and go across lots to conclusions and results so promptly. On our Western border is this especially manifest. Face to face with nature in some of her most remarkable and powerful manifestations, with all things new and untried, we burgeon out our powers untrammeled by custom or artificial restraints. Thus has come the fact that many men here, educated, as lawyers, teachers, physicians, and preachers, so readily turn their attention to other occupations, and carry on a wide range of effort. No better example can be found in the Northwest than in the subject of this sketch. Doctor Blalock was born in North Carolina on the 17th of February, 1836. After a boyhood of activity and industry, he devoted himself for some time to teaching; but, deciding that the practice of medicine should be his goal, he entered Jefferson Medical College in 1859, and graduated two years later. He had already been married to Miss Panthea A. Durham in 1858. Soon after graduating from the medical college, Doctor Blalock, with his wife and two children, moved to Mount Zion, Macon county, Illinois. The tempest of the Civil war just now was breaking on the country, and Doctor Blalock, with a broader patriotism than most of his misguided brethren of the South, joined the armies of the Nation as...

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