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Biographical Sketch of James Nowlin

James Nowlin and his wife, Martha Collins, were natives of Scotland. They came to America prior to the revolution, and brought all their household and kitchen furniture with them. They settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed to Pittsylvania County. Their only son, Bryan W. Nowlin, was a Captain in the American army during the revolution. He married Lucy Waide, of Virginia, and they had fifteen children, thirteen of whom lived to be grown, and twelve of them married. The eldest son, Peyton, married Lucy Townsend, and settled first in Kentucky, from whence he removed to Saline County, Mo., previous to 1820, and raised a large family of children. Richard Nowlin, brother of Peyton, married Celie Shelton, and settled first in Kentucky, and afterward in Saline County, Missouri. Samuel Nowlin married Fannie Paul, of Virginia, by whom he had Joseph and David. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Elizabeth Everson, by whom he had two daughters, both of whom are living in Virginia. Joseph Nowlin lived and died in Lynchburg, Va. David studied law at the University of Virginia. In 1835 he married Elizabeth Berger, of Virginia, and the following year he came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where he practiced his profession, and was elected to several official positions in the County, which he filled with credit to himself and his constituents. He was also a Baptist preacher, and possessed more than ordinary powers as a pulpit orator. His son, Samuel S. Nowlin, is an attorney, and lives at Montgomery City. He has served his County...

Biographical Sketch of James Moore

James Moore was born in Campbell County, Va., in 1761. He was married in 1795 to Priscilla Reed, by whom he had John G., William R., Sarah, Thomas, James G., Mary, and Martha. He was a Captain in the war of 1812. In 1839 he came to Missouri and settled on Dry Fork of Loutre, in Montgomery County, where died in 1858. His wife died one month later. Mr. Moore was a member of the Methodist Church, a quiet and inoffensive man, and highly esteemed by his neighbors and friends. His son, William R., married Mary Hubbard, of ,Virginia, and settled in St. Joseph, Mo. Sarah married William Farris, and remained in Virginia. Thomas married Edetha Reynolds, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery County in 1839. James G. never married. He settled in Montgomery County in 1839, and is the only one of the original family still living. Mary married William McDaniel, who settled in Montgomery County in 1839. Martha married Peter G. Hunter, of Montgomery...

Biographical Sketch of Robert Russell

Robert Russell, of Campbell Co., Va., settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1830. His wife’s maiden name was Bridget Bryant. Their children were James, Harrison, John, Mary, Susan, Elizabeth, and Sarah. Mr. Russell died in 1831, and was the first person buried in the noted old Virginia grave yard, of Montgomery County, which received its name from the fact that nearly all who were buried there were...

Slave Narrative of H. H. Edmunds

Interviewer: Albert Strope Person Interviewed: Rev. H. H. Edmunds Location: Elkhart, Indiana Place of Birth: Lynchburg, Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Albert Strope, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 Mishawaka, Indiana EX-SLAVE REV. H.H. EDMUNDS 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Rev. H.H. Edmunds has resided at 403 West Hickory Street in Elkhart for the past ten years. Born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1859, he lived there for several years. Later he was taken to Mississippi by his master, and finally to Nashville, Tennessee, where he lived until his removal to Elkhart. Mr. Edmunds is very religious, and for many years has served his people as a minister of the Gospel. He feels deeply that the religion of today has greatly changed from the “old time religion.” In slavery days, the colored people were so subjugated and uneducated that he claims they were especially susceptible to religion, and poured out their religious feelings in the so-called negro spirituals. Mr. Edmunds is convinced that the superstitions of the colored people and their belief in ghosts and gobblins is due to the fact that their emotions were worked upon by slave drivers to keep them in subjugation. Oftentimes white people dressed as ghosts, frightened the colored people into doing many things under protest. The “ghosts” were feared far more than the slave-drivers. The War of the Rebellion is not remembered by Mr. Edmunds, but he clearly remembers the period following the war known as the Reconstruction Period. The Negroes were very happy when they learned they were free as...

Slave Narrative of Richard Toler

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Richard Toler Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Residence: 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Blacksmith Ruth Thompson, Interviewing Graff, Editing Ex-Slave Interviews Hamilton Co., District 12 Cincinnati RICHARD TOLER 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, O. “Ah never fit in de wah; no suh, ah couldn’t. Mah belly’s been broke! But ah sho’ did want to, and ah went up to be examined, but they didn’t receive me on account of mah broken stomach. But ah sho’ tried, ’cause ah wanted to be free. Ah didn’t like to be no slave. Dat wasn’t good times.” Richard Toler, 515 Poplar Street, century old former slave lifted a bony knee with one gnarled hand and crossed his legs, then smoothed his thick white beard. His rocking chair creaked, the flies droned, and through the open, unscreened door came the bawling of a calf from the building of a hide company across the street. A maltese kitten sauntered into the front room, which served as parlor and bedroom, and climbed complacently into his lap. In one corner a wooden bed was piled high with feather ticks, and bedecked with a crazy quilt and an number of small, brightly-colored pillows; a bureau opposite was laden to the edges with a collection of odds and ends-a one-legged alarm clock, a coal oil lamp, faded aritifical flowers in a gaudy vase, a pile of newspapers. A trunk against the wall was littered with several large books (one of which was the family Bible), a stack of dusty lamp shades, a dingy sweater, and several bushel-basket lids. Several packing cases and crates, a...

Biography of Edward Watts Saunders, M. D.

Dr. Edward Watts Saunders, who for forty-three years has engaged in the practice of medicine in St. Louis and who is now professor emeritus of pediatrics and clinical obstetrics in the medical department of Washington University, was born in Campbell county, Virginia, on the 15th of October, 1854, a son of Robert C. and Caryetta (Davis) Saunders. His father was a Civil war veteran, serving as captain of Company A of the Eleventh Virginia Infantry of the Confederate army and winning promotion to the rank of major. In the maternal line was Captain Eugene Davis under General J.E.B. Stuart. He raised a company of calvary for service with the Confederate forces, was captured and imprisoned at Elmira, New York. An uncle, Richard T. Davis, was also a chaplain in the army. The ancestry of the Saunders family in America dates back to the middle of the seventeenth century, when settlement was made at Jamestown by one of the name. On the mother’s side the ancestral line is traced back only through three generations. The grandfather Davis was rector of the University of Virginia and met a tragic death, being assassinated by a drunken student in 1840. The early education of Dr. Saunders was obtained in private schools and the academic department of the University of Virginia. In preparation for his professional career he attended the medical department of the same university, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1875. He afterward took post-graduate work in the Royal University of Vienna, and in 1878 he came to St. Louis, where he opened an office, and through...

Biography of Ernest L. Ballard

The clerk of the district court and ex-ofificio auditor and recorder of Owyhee County, Idaho, residing in Silver City, is a native of the state of Virginia, his birth having occurred in Lynchburg on the 1st of February 1862. His ancestors, leaving their home in England, crossed the briny deep to the New World and became residents of Pennsylvania at the time William Penn founded the colony. They participated in the events which go to make up the early history of the Keystone state, and representatives of the name also fought for America in the war of 1812. Removing from Pennsylvania to Virginia, the family became identified with the interests of the south. Henry Clay Ballard, the father of our subject, was born, reared and educated in the Old Dominion and became a railroad contractor. He married Miss Sally Pollard, and during the civil war he served as a captain in General Munford’s cavalry in the Confederate army. He continued to reside in Virginia until 1880, when he removed to Colorado. He is now engaged in railroad contracting in British Columbia, and has reached the age of fifty-seven years. For many years he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplifies the beneficent teachings of that order. His wife died in 1880, in her fortieth year, leaving the husband and two children to mourn her loss. The daughter is now Mrs. Carr, of Liberty, Missouri. The son, Ernest L. Ballard, is indebted to the schools of the Old Dominion for the educational privileges he received. He remained a resident of Virginia until 1880, when...

Biographical Sketch of James Martin

James Martin, of Campbell County, Va., married Caroline Burton, by whom he had William, Elizabeth, Oliver W., Frances A., Edward M., Caroline W., Cynthia P., Sarah, and Thomas J. Mr. Martin settled in Warren County in 1830. William and Elizabeth remained in Virginia. Caroline W. married Garret Pratt, and lives in Warren County. Cynthia P. married William H. H. Simpson, of St. Charles County. Sarah married Charles A. Womack, of Lincoln...

Biographical Sketch of Rev. Nicholas C. Kabler

Rev. Nicholas C. Kabler, of Campbell Co., Va., was a son of Rev. Nicholas Kabler, of the same County. He married Sarah Goldon, of Virginia, and settled in Warren County, Mo., in 1830. He was a Methodist minister, and traveled with Rev. Andrew Monroe for a number of years. His children were Ellen, Simeon, William A., Lucy, Anna, Parks, and Charles. Ellen married William McMurtry, of Callaway County. Simeon and Lucy died in Virginia. William A. married Lucy J. Pendleton, of Warren County, whose father and mother, James Pendleton and Nancy Sharp, settled in that county in 1833. Her brothers and sisters were Robert, Frances, Patrick, Elizabeth, James L., and Caroline. Anna Kabler married Marcellus C. Poindexter, of St. Louis. Charles lives in California,...

Biographical Sketch of William Carnefax

Carnefax, William of England, settled in Campbell County, Va., and married Esther Maxey, by whom he had Edward, John D., Charles, William, Benjamin, Nancy, Lucy, Rebecca, Mary, and Rhoda. John settled in Warren County in 1832, and married Jane W. Leavell.
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