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Clifford Family of New Bedford, MA

Among the most prominent law offices in southern Massachusetts is one which by lineal succession has existed for nearly, if not quite, a hundred years, and in which three generations of the Clifford family have been represented. The members of the Clifford family who have been such important factors in this old and prominent law firm came of a distinguished ancestry. The late John H. Clifford was a direct descendant in the eighth generation from George Clifford, who came with his wife Elizabeth and son John from Arnold village and parish, Nottinghamshire, England, to Boston in 1644.

Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

Descendants of Thomas Boyden of Bridgewater, MA

BOYDEN (Walpole-Bridgewater family). For a half century – for fifty and more years: – the name Boyden has stood in the town of Bridgewater, Mass., as a synonym for the highest type of useful, ennobling and elevating citizenship, as exemplified in the life of the now venerable principal emeritus of the Bridgewater State Normal School, Prof. Albert Gardner Boyden, who for the long period of fifty and more years has been identified as student, teacher and principal with the noted institution of learning alluded to, and has reared a son who has taken up the work so recently laid down by the father and is now carrying it forward in a manner worthy of him whose mantle he wears. Reference is made to Prof. Arthur Clarke Boyden. This Boyden family of Bridgewater is descended from Thomas Boyden, of Watertown, who came in the ship “Francis” from Ipswich, England, in 1634, when aged twenty-one years. He was of Scituate in the following year, uniting with the church there May 17th of that same year. He was made a freeman in 1647. By his wife Frances he had children: Thomas, born Sept. 26, 1639; Mary, born Oct. 15, 1641; Rebecca, born Nov. 1, 1643; Nathaniel, born in 1650; Jonathan, born Feb. 20, 1652; and Sarah, born Oct. 12, 1654. The father removed to Boston in 1651 and Jonathan and Sarah were born there. The mother of these died March 17, 1658, and he married Nov. 3d, following, Mrs. Hannah Morse, widow of Joseph, and removed in a few years to Medfield. So far as is known only one of the sons...

Copeland Family of Easton, MA

COPELAND (Whitman family). The family bearing this name is one of long and honorable standing in southeastern Massachusetts. Early at Braintree, then at Bridgewater, and for generations in the town of Easton, this Easton-Whitman branch of the earlier Braintree stock has for several generations been one of Easton’s leading families, and more recently – a later generation – in the new town of Whitman, formerly South Abington. Reference is made to the forefathers of the present George Copeland and Horatio Franklin Copeland, M. D., brothers. The latter though of Easton birth has been for nearly half a century active and prominent in the professional and social life of what is now Whitman. Himself a veteran of the Civil war, the Doctor is a representative of patriotic ancestry, his father being a soldier of the war of 1812 and his great-grandfather of the Revolution, and he, too, is representative of the Pilgrim Fathers, descending in direct line from John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, of the “Mayflower.” There follows in chronological order from his first paternal American ancestor Dr. Copeland’s lineage. Lawrence Copeland is of record at Braintree as early as 1651, Dec. 12th of which year he married Lydia Townsend. His death occurred Dec. 30, 1699, when, according to the gravestone, he was aged an hundred years. His widow Lydia died Jan. 8, 1688. Their children were: Thomas, born May 10, 1652; Thomas (2), born in 1654 or 1655; William, born Nov. 15, 1656; John, born Feb. 10, 1659; Lydia, born May 31, 1661; Ephraim, born Jan. 17, 1665; Hannah, born Feb. 25, 1668; Richard, born July 11, 1672; and...

Swift Family of New Bedford, MA

SWIFT. For a hundred years and more the Swift family in and about New Bedford has been one of prominence, wealth. and influence, not only in the several local communities in which its members have resided but out through the Commonwealth and into the nation, where their extensive enterprises have extended. These Acushnet-New Bedford Swifts, a branch of the Cape Cod family, brought to their new field of effort that activity, industry, ability and honesty that had for generations characterized their forefathers and also the line of business that had enriched earlier generations in the old home section – the dealing in live oak timber and its manufacture into water craft, in shipbuilding for not only the United States government, but for those across the water. William Swift, the progenitor of the Swifts under consideration in this article, was at Watertown in the year 1634, and it seems had then been there some time, coming thither from Booking, England. He disposed of his estate in 1637, removed to Sandwich, and there died in January, 1644. His widow Joan, perhaps a second wife, made her will in October, 1662, mentioning therein her son William and his children. His daughter Hannah married Nov. 5, 1642, Daniel Wing. William Swift (2), son of William the settler, was born in England, came to New England and lived in Sandwich, Mass., dying in the year 1705-06. He married a woman whose Christian name was Ruth, and their children were: William, born Aug. 28, 1654, died in 1700-01; he married Elizabeth, and their children were William, Joseph, Benjamin, Thomas, Josiah and Ebenezer. Ephraim, born June...

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard was born Dec. 11, 1836, in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), son of the late Josiah and Betsey D. (Bolton) Packard, and was descended from old and sturdy New England ancestry. The following history of his branch of the Packard family is given in chronological order from the American progenitor. Samuel Packard came from Windham, near Hingham, England, with his wife and child in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, in 1638, John Martin, master, there being 133 passengers on board. Samuel Packard settled first in Hingham, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1638. Later he removed to the West parish of Bridgewater, where the first interior settlement in the State was made. He was constable in 1644, and licensed to keep a tavern in 1670. His will was probated March 3, 1684-85, from which it appears that the Christian name of his wife was Elizabeth. His children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Jr., Zaccheus, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Mary, Hannah, Israel, Jael, Deborah and Deliverance. Zaccheus Packard, son of Samuel, married Sarah Howard,...

Wright Family of Boston, MA

WRIGHT. The family of this name is an early Boston family, which through marriage is allied with some of the historic families of New England, among them those of Adams, Winslow and Wentworth. We give herewith an outline of the earlier generations, beginning with the first ancestor in this country. (I) Richard Wright, born about 1607, died in Plymouth, Mass., June 9, 1691. In 1644 he married Hester Cook, and they had children: Adam, Esther and Mary. (II) Adam Wright, born about 1644, died Sept. 20, 1724. He was twice married, having by his first wife, Sarah (Soule), two children, John and Isaac, and by his second wife, Mehitable (Barrows), four children, Samuel, Moses, James and Nathan. (III) Samuel Wright, born about 1700, died Jan. 5, 1773. He was of Plympton. By his wife, Anna (Tillson), born about 1704, died Nov. 16, 1792, he had children as follows: Ruth, born Aug. 12, 1723; Ruth (2), March 1, 1725; Sarah, June 3, 1726 (married a Hall); Samuel, Oct. 6, 1728; Edmund, Oct. 28, 1730; Jacob, April 17, 1733; Lydia, Sept. 22, 1736. (IV) Jacob Wright, of Plympton, born April 17, 1733, son of Samuel and Anna (Tillson) Wright, died March 30, 1818. He married Deborah Torrey, of Weymouth, born Sept. 18, 1731, died Dec. 31, 1820. Children: Ann, born Jan. 1, 1753; Zadoc, April 17, 1754 (served in the Revolutionary war); Joseph, Oct. 31, 1756; Deborah, April 14, 1761; Edmund, July 26, 1763; Jabez, July 13, 1765; Silas, March 7, 1773 (died in Boston). (V) Edmund Wright, of Boston, born July 26, 1763, died in Boston, Dec. 10, 1837. He...

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

Olcott Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Peter Olcott was born at Bolton, Connecticut, April 25, 1733; married Sarah, daughter of Peletiah Mills, Esq., of Windsor, Conn., October 11, 1759, and removed to that place in 1772. That year or the following one he came to Norwich, Vermont. He was the oldest of his parents’ four children (two sons and two daughters), and the only one of them to come to Norwich to reside. Mr. Olcott‘s name first appears in the town records of Norwich in 1773, when he was chosen one of the overseers of the poor, at the annual March meeting. He early took a leading part in public affairs in his new home. He was elected to the most important town offices, and soon came to be regarded as one of the leading men of the place. It is probable that he was a man of considerable means when he came to Norwich, which, united with his superior talents, gave him a commanding influence in the community. The next year (1774) the annual town meeting was held at his house, and such meetings continued to be so held until 1779, after which they were held at the meeting house, except in severe winter weather. Probably his influence was potent in fixing the location of the first meeting house very near to his residence and upon land which he gave for a site. He also gave the land for the old burying ground adjoining. Mr. Olcott was the first justice of the peace in town, being chosen to that office at a special town meeting called for that purpose April 7, 1778. In...

Biography of Margaret Fuller

MARGARET FULLER, the first child of Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane, was born May 23, 1810, in the house now (1902) numbered 71, Cherry St., Cambridge. After her father’s death she was her mother’s chief stay; for, though of very little business experience, and with a natural aversion to financial affairs, she had a strength of mind and courageous firmness which stayed up her mother’s hands when the staff on which she had leaned was stricken away. It had been the life-long desire of Margaret to go to Europe and complete her culture there, and arrangements with this view had been matured at her father’s death. Her patrimony would have still sufficed for the desired tour; but she must have left her mother sinking under a sense of helplessness, with young children to educate. Margaret, after a struggle between a long-cherished and darling project and her sense of duty, resolved to give up her own brilliant hopes and remain with her mother. She applied herself personally to the academic training of the children, who learned from her the rudiments of the classic languages and the first reading of some of their great authors. We extract from the “Mount Auburn Memorial” the following “Her wonderful power of conversation lives in memory alone. It is said that there has been no woman like her in this respect since Madame de Stael; but while Margaret Fuller’s conversation, in eloquence and effect, in sparkle and flow, was like that of the gifted French woman, it had a merit which the latter could not claim. There is hardly upon record one with her power...

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