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Genealogy of Samuel Austin

Samuel, only surviving son of Henry and Elizabeth Lyles Austin, continued living in Calvert County, Maryland. By 1730, Samuel was married to Elizabeth Marshall, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Marshall. They had eleven surviving children when Samuel’s will was written in 1763. Some of their children moved to Virginia, specifically Albemarle County. Samuel Austin’s will of 1763 read: “In the name of God amen. I Samuel Austin of Calvert County in the province of Maryland, planter being in good health of body and of sound anal perfect mind and memory, I do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I desire that my debts may be paid and discharged at the discretion of my executor hereafter named and as touching the temporal estate that it hath been pleased God to bestow upon me I do give and bequeath in manner and form following. First I do give and bequeath unto my son William Austin that part of my land to the westward of the church rode and his heirs forever and one negro boy named George and one negro woman named Sarah. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son James Austin and his heirs forever all my land to the eastward of the church rode and one negro boy named Abraham. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son Henry Austin one negro woman Priss. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Austin one negro boy named Dick. Next I do give and bequeath unto my daughter Margaret Austin one negro girl named Rachel. Next...

Genealogy of Henry Austin

Austin as a surname is a variation of Augustine or Augustus. The Austin line enters the Spracklin line with the marriage of George E. Spracklin to Grace Belle Austin on 29 March 1903. There have been several Austin coats of arms granted as early as 1660 but many of the lines have died out. This particular Austin line came early to Calvert Co., Maryland. They were planters, that is, owners of plantations and more than likely raised tobacco on the land there. To help them with their plantations, they owned slaves as evidenced by wills. And it is quite possible, that the early Austin’s had close associations with the Quakers of early Maryland. According to the wills, the Austin men remembered their God who blessed them with all that they had. Many of the heraldic symbols in Austin’s’ arms were crosses. The motto: “Trust in God and He will give strength” seems quite appropriate. It is quite probable that the Austin family came from England to New England sometime around 1665. Likewise the Harrisons, Lyles and quite possibly the Marshalls all came to Maryland around the same time. Samuel and Henry Austin, sons of Thomas Austin, came to Calvert Co., Md. Henry Austin was born before 1687 and died in Calvert Co., Md. He had married twice: first, to Elizabeth Lyles, widow of Robert Lyles who had died around 1705. From that marriage he had a son Samuel who was born around 1710. By 1729 Henry married the second time to Jane Harvey, widow. Henry’s will of 1745 reads: “In the name of God amen. I Henry Austin of...

Biography of H. Wheeler Bond, M. D.

Dr. H. Wheeler Bond, a St. Louis physician and surgeon, comes from a family that has left many distinguished names upon the records of the medical profession in America. His ancestral line can be traced back to Dr. Thomas Bond who was the progenitor of the family in the new world and who later founded the first school of medicine in the United States. This was established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which city has always been a center of medical learning. The records show that Dr. Thomas Bond came to this country from England with a nephew, John Bond, who studied medicine and surgery under him in Philadelphia. This Dr. John Bond at the outbreak of troubles between the French colonies of Canada and the British colonies along the Atlantic, joined a Pennsylvania regiment and was with General Braddock in the French and Indian war, in which he was taken prisoner and was for a time incarcerated at Fort Duquesne, which is now the city of Pittsburgh. He was afterward taken by the Indians to Canada. In recognition of his service to the chief’s son he was given his freedom. After his return home he again entered upon active military professional duty in the British Colonial army. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary war his sympathies were entirely with the colonies, so he resigned from the British service, but owing to his oath of allegiance to the Crown he felt in honor bound to remain neutral during the struggle. It was then he settled in Calvert county, Maryland, and established the Bond family in that state. From that time they...

Biography of W. T. Yoe

The Independence Tribune is one of the oldest papers in Kansas, with a record of continuous issue in one locality for forty-six years, and it is even older than that since the same plant had been used for publishing a paper in Missouri for several years before its removal to Independence, when that town was located on the frontier and at the very beginning of its growth and development. The Tribune ever since its establishment has been under the control of two veteran newspaper men, both brothers, W. T. Yoe, who is editor, and Charles Yoe, who is president of The Tribune Printing Company. The manager of the publication is Charles Albert Connelly, who grew up in the Tribune establishment and has himself been identified with that journal for more than thirty years. The record of the Yoe brothers in connection with The Tribune is one of special interest to Kansans. W. T. Yoe was born at Port Republic, Calvert County, Maryland, March 26, 1845. The Yoes were an old Maryland family, having come from England with Lord Baltimore and most of the descendants of the first emigrants still live in Maryland. Walter Yoe, father of the Yoe brothers, was born in Maryland in 1800 and died at Rushville, Illinois, in 1867. He was reared and married in Maryland, and in 1848 moved to Rushville, Illinois. He followed his trade as carpenter and builder, was a republican in politics, served a time as a member of the Illinois militia. His wife was Elizabeth William Harris, who was born in Virginia in 1818 and died at Rushville, Illinois, in 1859....

Biography of Charles Yoe

The record of the Yoe brothers in connection with The Tribune is one of special interest to Kansans. W. T. Yoe was born at Port Republic, Calvert County, Maryland, March 26, 1845. The Yoes were an old Maryland family, having come from England with Lord Baltimore and most of the descendants of the first emigrants still live in Maryland. Walter Yoe, father of the Yoe brothers, was born in Maryland in 1800 and died at Rushville, Illinois, in 1867. He was reared and married in Maryland, and in 1848 moved to Rushville, Illinois. He followed his trade as carpenter and builder, was a republican in politics, served a time as a member of the Illinois militia. His wife was Elizabeth William Harris, who was born in Virginia in 1818 and died at Rushville, Illinois, in 1859. Her family came from the North of Ireland, and her brother, Rev. William Harris, was a Baptist minister, served as a colonel in the Confederate army, and died in Shelbyville, Kentucky, in 1870. Walter Yoe and wife had three sons: W. T., Charles and Franklin F. Franklin is a druggist at Independence, Kansas, and thus all three of the brothers are identified with that city. Charles Yoe, the younger of these veteran publishers, and the president of the company, was born at Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois, September 22, 1849, the year following the removal of his parents to that locality. Gaining his education in the public schools there, at the early age of sixteen he started for himself and found employment at various seasons as a farmer, in sawing wood, peddling ice and...

Maryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MarylandMaryland Cemetery Records, Alleghany to BaltimoreMaryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester CountiesRocky Gap Veterans Cemetery Calvert County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Calvert County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Harrison Family Graveyard Lower Marlboro United Methodist Church Cemetery Olivet United Methodist Church Cemetery Caroline County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Caroline County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Denton Catholic Cemetery Denton Township Cemetery Burrsville Union Methodist Cemetery Burrsville Wesley Methodist Cemetery Carroll County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Carroll County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Bachman’s Cemetery Baust’s (Emanuel) Lutheran/Reformed Cemetery Brandenburg United Methodist Church Cemetery Krider’s (St Benjamin’s) Lutheran & Reformed Cemetery Leister’s/St John’s Cemetery Mountainview Cemetery Mt. John’s United Methodist Church Old Leister’s Church Cemetery Piney Creek Presbyterian Cemetery Runnymeade Cemetery St. John’s Catholic Cemetery St. Mary’s Lutheran/Reformed Cemetery Trinity Lutheran Church Cemetery Westminster Cemetery Winter’s (St Luke’s Evangelical Lutheran) Cemetery Wolf’s Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Manchester Cemetery Meadow Branch Cemetery St. John’s (Leisters) Lutheran Cemetery Cecil County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Cecil County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Cecilton (Zion) Cemetery Cecilton (Zion) Cemetery #2 Cherry Hill UMC Cemetery Harmony Chapel Cemetery McKinney Town Cemetery Northeast Cemeter Plot Owners-North East United Methodist Cemetery: Part 1 Part 2 Rose of Lima Cemetery St. Francis Xavier Shrine Cemetery St. Stephen’s Churchyard Cemetery Tombstone Inscriptions of...

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