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Wisconsin Gold Star List – Calumet County

Army Braun, Leo, 31, New Holstein; pvt 58inf; kia Aug 6,’18. Brooks, Gerhard W., 25, Forest Junction; pvt 38inf; kia Oct 8,’18. Buhl, George, 27, Hayton; pvt 161depbrig; U. S.; dd (pneu) Oct 3, ’18. Engelhardt, Carl, 34, High Cliff; pvt 127inf; Roncheres, Fismes, Soissons; dw Sept 3,’18. Gerhards, Clemens, 27, Chilton; corp 127inf; Fismes, Soissons, Juvigny, near Verdun, Gesnes; dw Oct 7,’18. Gerhardt, Fred, 28, Chilton; pvt 58inf; kia (sinking of Moldavia) May 23, ’18. Grassold, Randolph 0., 24, m, Chilton; WNG; 2Lt 127inf; AisneMarne; dw Jy 31, ’18. Holzschuh, George, 24, Hilbert ; pvt 1cl 125inf ; near Courmont and Cierges; kia Jy 31,’18. Hostettler, William D., 22, Hilbert; pvt 127inf; U. S.; dd (pneu) Jan 12, ’18. Kaiser, Austin Peter, 23, New Holstein; pvt 106inf ; d Sept 27, ’18. Kaplick, Bernhard, 25, Kiel; pvt 20engnrs; U. S.; dd (pneu) Jan 12, ’18. Kasper, Edmund A., 29, Potter; pvt 333hvfa; overseas; dd (pneu) Oct 2, ’18. Kasper, Ernest J., 27, Brillion; pvt 106inf; Dickebusch, Kemmel, Hindenburg Line, Cambrai, St. Quentin; kia Sept 26, ’18. King, George Cleveland, 26, Chilton; pvt supco 70inf; U. S.; dd (pneu) Oct 8,’18. McHugh, Thomas, 30, Stockbridge; pvt 58inf ; kia Jy 18, ’18. Olsen, Sherman, 23, New Holstein; pvt 47inf; near Verdun; dw Sept 30, ’18. Puetz, John M., 22, m, New Holstein; pvt 38inf ; St. Mihiel, Argonne; w; dd (pneu) Oct 23,’18. Rife, Lloyd H., 24, Chilton; pvt 1cl 127inf; Aisne-Marne; kia Jy 31, ’18. Ryan, Herbert J., 19, Brillion; WNG; pvt 150mgbn; Fere en Tardenois; kia Nov 5, ’18. Schreiber, Edward C., 32, Brillion; pvt 38inf; Argonne;...

Biographical Sketch of S. H. Harrison

S. H. Harrison, attorney-at-law and loan agent, was born in Rutland County, Vt., January 17, 1837. Removed to Dodge County, Wis., in the fall of 1855. In the fall of 1859 he went to Minnesota. In 1862 he enlisted in the United States Army, in Company B, Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in January 1866. He was commissioned first lieutenant of Company C, Sixty-fifth Infantry, and returned to Wisconsin; thence to Harrison County, Mo. In the spring of 1875 he came to Jewell County, Kan., and located at Jewell City, after which he removed to Mankato, where he now resides. He was admitted to practice law in Harrison County, Mo. Is now doing business under the firm name of Harrison & Mechem. Has held the office of Justice of the Peace. He is the owner of 400 acres of land, 225 of which are under cultivation. He was married in Gravesville, Wis., March 4, 1858, to Miss Albina M. Godding; they have had five children – A. V., Lorena (now deceased), Francis E., S. H. and N....

Biographical Sketch of S. F. Vaughn

S. F. Vaughn, brother of C. S. Vaughn, was born in Calumet County, Wis., in 1854. With a limited common school education, he commenced the printing business, an excellent school, at the age of fourteen. Established the Black Creek (Wis.) Journal in 1877, and the Northern Wisconsin News in 1879. Came West in August 1881, and with his brother established the Western Advocate at...

Biographical Sketch of B. F. Dow

B. F. Dow, merchant, was born in the State of Maine, January 13, 1845. Removed to Wisconsin in November 1853. Enlisted in the Union army February 22, 1864, in Company K, Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry; discharged June 26, 1866. After he returned to Wisconsin, came to Jewell County, Kan., in September 1871, and took a homestead. Engaged in merchandising in the town of Omio, February 11, 1879. Built a stone store building, 20×40 feet, in 1880, and is now carrying a stock of general merchandise. Was married in Chilton, Wisconsin, on the 7th day of June...

Brotherton Tribe

Brotherton Indians. The name of two distinct bands, each formed of remnants of various Algonquian tribes. The best-known band was composed of individuals of the Mahican, Wappinger, Mohegan, Pequot, Narraganset, etc., of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and of the Montauk and others from Long Island, who settled in 1788 on land given them by the Oneida at the present Marshall, Oneida County, New York, near the settlement then occupied by the Stockbridge. Those of New England were mainly from Farmington, Stonington, Groton, Mohegan, and Niantic (Lyme), in Connecticut, and from Charlestown in Rhode Island. They all went under the leadership of Samson Occum the Indian minister, and on arriving in Oneida county called their settlement Brotherton. As their dialects were different they adopted the English language. They numbered 250 in 1791. In 1833 they removed to Wisconsin with the Oneida and Stockbridge and settled on the east side of Winnebago Lake, in Calumet County, where they soon after abandoned their tribal relations and became citizens, together with the other emigrant tribes settled near Green Bay. They are called Wapanachki, “eastern people,” by the neighboring Algonquian tribes. The other band of that name was composed of Raritan and other divisions of the Delaware who, according to Ruttenber1, occupied a reservation called Brotherton, in Burlington County, New Jersey, until 1802, when they accepted an invitation to unite with the Stockbridge and Brotherton then living in Oneida County, New York. In 1832 they sold their last rights in New Jersey. They were then reduced to about 40 souls and were officially recognized as Delaware and claimed territory south of the Raritan as...

Biography of Willard E. Lyon

Willard E. Lyon, of Lincoln, is an old time Kansas man, having lived in this state from early infancy. He became widely known in educational affairs, but in more recent years had applied his time and energies to a rapidly developing business as a real estate and oil man at Lincoln. Mr. Lyon was born at Chilton, Calumet County, Wisconsin, March 30, 1874, but came to Kansas too early in life to have any distinct recollections of his native locality. His grandfather, Christopher C. Lyon, was born in Western New York in 1817, was a farmer by occupation, and lived successively in the states of Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Kansas. He came to Kansas in 1877, homesteading 160 acres at Yorktown, then called Allamead. When quite an old man, about 1887, he retired into Lincoln, and had twenty years of quiet enjoyment of the fruits of his prosperity before his death, which occurred in Lincoln in 1907, at the age of ninety years and one month. He was one of the older men who helped fight the war of the rebellion. He enlisted with a Wisconsin regiment and took part in the great campaign when Sherman marched his troops to the sea. Christopher Lyon was twice married. His first wife, grandmother of Willard E., bore the family name of Clark. She died in Calumet County, Wisconsin. His second wife was a Miss Hitchcock. Frank Lyon, father of Willard E., was born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1850 and died at Lincoln, Kansas, in 1906. When he was a boy his parents removed to Chilton, Wisconsin, where he grew up and married...

Biographical Sketch of Fred D. Cleaves

FRED D. CLEAVES. – Although among the young men, Mr. Cleaves has for a number of years held responsible public positions. He was born in Stockbridge, Wisconsin, in 1852, residing in that village and at Fond du Lac until ten years of age, and coming in 1864 to this coast with his father’s family. Here is one of the few cases in which we find one of the early settlers returning to the East. After a year’s residence at Whidby Island, and two years at Albany, Oregon, the elder Cleaves recrossed the plains to his old home in Wisconsin. The change gave young Fred a better opportunity for education; but upon reaching man’s estate he still remembered the Pacific coast, and gradually drifted hither. Two years he stopped in Colorado. Finally coming up to Puget Sound, he began professional work, as teacher of penmanship at White River, and in 1880 made his home at La Conner, teaching there a few years. He found more agreeable employment, however, as clerk in the store of B.L. Martin, and afterwards for L.L. Andrews. While in the latter position, he was elected on the Democratic ticket as county treasurer of Skagit county one year, and re-elected in1884. He was also appointed clerk of the district court by Judge Greene, and was continued in this position by Judges Jones, Boyle, Burke and Hanford. He has also operated a real estate office, handling much property. He has the reputation of being an upright man in both public and private life, and enjoys the confidence of the...

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