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Attacapa Tribe

Attacapa Indians.  A tribe forming the Attacapan linguistic family, a remnant of which early in the 19th century occupied as its chief habitat the Middle or Prien lake in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. It is learned from Hutchins1 that “the village de Skunnemoke” or Tuckapas stood on Vermilion River, and that their church was on the west side of the Tage (Bayou Tèche). The Attacapa country extended formerly to the coast in south west Louisiana, and their primitive domain was outlined in the popular name of the Old Attacapa or Tuckapa country, still in use, which comprised St Landry, St Mary, Iberia, St Martin, Fayette, Vermilion, and, later, Calcasieu and Vernon parishes; in fact all the country between Ked, Sabine, and Vermilion rivers and the Gulf2 . Charlevoix states that in 1731 some Attacapa with some Hasinai and Spaniards aided the French commander, Saint Denys, against the Natchez. Pénicaut3 says that at the close of 1703 two of the three Frenchmen whom Bienville sent by way of the Madeline River to discover what nations dwelt in that region, returned and reported that they had been more than 100 leagues inland and had found 7 different nations, and that among the last, one of their comrades had been killed and eaten by the savages, who were anthropophagous. This nation was called Attacapa. In notes accompanying his Attacapa vocabulary Duralde says that they speak of a deluge which engulfed men, animals, and the land, when only those who dwelt on a highland escaped; he also says that according to their law a man ceases to bear his own name as soon as...

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