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Native American History of Butts County, Georgia

Butts County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) It is named after Captain Samuel Butts, who was killed in action during the Creek Civil War (Redstick War.) Its county seat is Jackson. Captain Butts commanded a militia company in the First Brigade of the Georgia Militia, under the command of Brig. Gen. John Floyd. The army consisted of 1,200 Caucasians and 400 Georgia Yuchi. It was attacked at night at Calebee Creek on January 27. 1814. The English word comes from the Creek word Kvlvpe, which means White Oak. The Georgians sustained so many casualties, including Captain Butts that it retreated to Fort Mitchell on the Chattahoochee River. The Yuchi were promised that if they fought against the Red Stick Creeks, they could stay in Georgia forever. Many lost their land at the “Treaty of Fort Jackson” in 1814 before they even got home. The Yuchi also lost their status as a separate tribe at that time. Butts County is the location of one of the sacred places of the Creek People, Indian Springs and a hotel built by Creek leader, William McIntosh. Indian Springs State Park in Butts County is the oldest state park in the United States. The property went from being a Creek Reserve to state ownership very soon after the Treaty of 1827 eliminated all Creek tribal lands in Georgia. The Indian Spring Hotel, built by McIntosh, has been restored under the leadership of the Butts County Historical Society. Butts County is bounded on the north by Newton County and Monroe County on the south. Jasper...

Slave Narrative of Jack Atkinson

Interviewer: Henrietta Carlisle Person Interviewed: Jack Atkinson Interviewed: August 21, 1936 Location: Griffin, Georgia Rt. D Griffin, Georgia, Interviewed August 21, 1936 [MAY 8 1937] “Onct a man, twice a child,” quoted Jack Atkinson, grey haired darkey, when being interviewed, “and I done started in my second childhood. I useter be active as a cat, but I ain’t, no mo.” Jack acquired his surname from his white master, a Mr. Atkinson, who owned this Negro family prior to the War Between the States. He was a little boy during the war but remembers “refugeeing” to Griffin from Butts County, Georgia, with the Atkinsons when Sherman passed by their home on his march to the sea. Jack’s father, Tom, the body-servant of Mr. Atkinson, “tuck care of him” [HW: during] the four years they were away at war. “Many’s the time I done heard my daddy tell ’bout biting his hands he wuz so hongry, and him and Marster drinking water outer the ruts of the road, they wuz so thirsty, during the war.” “Boss Man (Mr. Atkinson), wuz as fine a man as ever broke bread”, according to Jack. When asked how he got married he stated that he “broke off a love vine and throwed it over the fence and if it growed” he would get married. The vine “just growed and growed” and it wasn’t long before he and Lucy married. “A hootin’ owl is a sho sign of rain, and a screech owl means a death, for a fact.” “A tree frog’s holler is a true sign of rain.” Jack maintains that he has received “a...

Coweta Tribe

The Coweta were the second great Muskogee tribe among the Lower Creeks, and they headed the war side as Kasihta headed the peace side. Their honorary title in the confederacy was Kawita ma’ma’yi, “tall Coweta.” Although as a definitely identified tribe they appear later in history and in the migration legends which have been preserved to us the Kasihta are given precedence, the Coweta were and still are commonly accounted the leaders of the Lower Creeks and often of the entire nation. By many early writers all of the Lower Creeks are called Coweta, and the Spaniards and French both speak of the Coweta chief as ”emperor” of the Creeks. An anonymous French writer of the eighteenth century draws the following picture of his power at the time of the Yamasee uprising: The nation of the Caoüita is governed by an emperor, who in 1714 [1715] caused to be killed all the English there were, not only in his nation, but also among the Abeca, Talapouches, Alibamons, and Cheraqui. Not content with that he went to commit depredations as far as the gates of Carolina. The English were excited and wanted to destroy them by making them drag pieces of ordinance loaded with grape-shot, by tying two ropes to the collar of the tube, on each one of which they put sixty savages, whom they killed in the midst of their labors by putting fire to the cannon; but as they saw they would take vengeance with interest, they made very great presents to the emperor to regain his friendship and that of his nation. The French do the same...

Biographical Sketch of Cox, George B.

George B. Cox first came to Larned, Kansas, in 1872 and opened a hotel and ran the same until he came to Dodge City and began the erection of The Dodge House in the fall and winter of the same year. This hotel is 30×125 feet deep, and contains thirty-eight rooms. It was erected and furnished at a cost of $11,452, and opened to the public January 18, 1873. It was run by the firm of Cox & Boyd until January 10, 1883, when Mr. Cox bought the whole interest. He was born in Butts County, Ga., September 10, 1836, and lived in that State until the Rebellion broke out, when he became a member of the Fourth Georgia Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. After army life he drifted about in various places until he came to Kansas. He was married in 1871 to Miss Annie H. Bennett, of Trenton, N. J. They have one daughter, Clara Bell. He is a member of the Farmers’ and Mechanics’ Insurance Company of St. Louis, Mo., and E. A. Union of Dodge City. He has served as Probate Judge of Ford County, and Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners; has been a member of the City Council, at present a member of the School...

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