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1850 Gazetteer of Buckfast Abbey England

BUCKFAST ABBEY, in the Dart valley, about a mile north of Buckfastleigh, was founded by Ethelwerd, son of Wm. de Pomeroy, in 1137, for monks of the Cistercian order, and was richly endowed by him and subsequent benefactors. Its clear yearly income was valued at the dissolution at no less than £466. 11s. 2¾d. The site of the abbey was granted to Sir Thomas Dennis, and the manor of Buckfast was afterwards held by the Bakers and Doyleys, but was sold in parcels many years ago. The abbey ruins were extensive, but they were mostly taken down about 1806, except a large square tower, and a Norman arch, finely mantled with ivy. The Abbey House, built over the abbey vaults, is a modern mansion, in the castellated Tudor style. At the Grange, is the ancient tithe barn, 108 feet long; and some of the neighbouring houses appear to have been partly built with stones from the abbey ruins. The Earl of Macclesfield is lord of the manor of Brooke Mainbow, with Buckfastleigh and Button, and owns a great part of the parish. The rest is chiefly freehold, and belongs to J. J. and Charles Edwards, Esqrs., R. J. King, Esq., and the Savery, Barnes, Gower, Tucker, Furneaux, Michelmore, Hamlyn, Symons, and other families. About thirty acres are let in allotments to the poor. The manor of Kilbenland is dismembered, and that of Bosom Zeal extends into this parish. Henbury Castle, on the top of a commanding eminence, north of the village, is a circular entrenchmant of about six acres, encompassed by a deep ditch, now covered with coppice wood....

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